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HEALTH
From Sun staff and news services | August 30, 2012
Maryland health officials are reporting the state's first death from the West Nile virus. State health department spokeswoman Dori Henry said Thursday that the department is not releasing any details on the death. Maryland has had 13 cases of West Nile virus this year. Nineteen cases, including one death, were reported last year, and 23 cases the year before in Maryland. Federal officials announced Wednesday that West Nile cases nationwide are up 40 percent since last week and may rival the record years of 2002 and 2003.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 13, 2014
Federal Centers for Disease Control Director Thomas R. Frieden has been saying for weeks that Americans have little to fear from the deadly Ebola epidemic that has killed some 4,000 people in West Africa. But with news over the weekend that a nurse at the hospital in Texas where the first reported case of Ebola in the U.S. was treated has tested positive for the virus, even he now admits the nation may not be adequately prepared for an outbreak. Making sure that it is should be the CDC's top priority until we can be assured that what happened in Texas won't be repeated again elsewhere.
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NEWS
March 5, 2007
Anew study reconfirms that millions of young American women ages 14 to 24 are infected with the virus that can cause cervical cancer. More young women should be protected against the virus, but there's no need to mandate a promising vaccine at this time. Human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the country, infecting more than 33 percent of women by age 24 and about 25 percent of women under 60. The new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 7.5 million teenage girls and young women carry the virus.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector and Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Federal officials announced Wednesday that they plan to screen international passengers for Ebola at five major U.S. airports, while hospitals around the country continue to isolate patients showing Ebola-like symptoms. At least four Baltimore-area hospitals recently segregated patients with travel histories and other possible indications of Ebola, though the virus was ruled out in each case. Other cases were suspected and ruled out at two Washington-area hospitals last week. Meanwhile, the first U.S. patient diagnosed with the virus died Wednesday in Dallas.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Sun reporter | November 8, 1999
Tim Couch had a touch of a virus yesterday and the entire Cleveland Browns' team had a sick look. Couch, the first pick in the collegiate draft last April, looked like a struggling rookie quarterback as he completed nine of 21 passes for 57 yards before he was yanked in the fourth quarter for the first time in his athletic career in the 41-9 loss to the Ravens.Although neither Couch nor coach Chris Palmer mentioned it, backup quarterback Ty Detmer...
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Samson, the young male elephant who was diagnosed with a deadly virus at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore late last month, has continued to recover in recent days and has "turned a very positive corner" in his treatment, according to zoo officials. "His energy levels are very close to normal again, he's much brighter and a lot of his symptoms have either gone away or are nearly gone," Michael McClure, general curator for the zoo's animal department, said Thursday. McClure said he and his staff have been nursing Samson back to health around the clock for nearly four weeks and are encouraged by his recovery from the virus, known as elephant endotheliotropic herpes virus.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
Scientists believe a virus similar to measles in humans is responsible for an accelerating die-off in bottlenose dolphins along the Mid-Atlantic coast. Since July 1, 333 dead dolphins have washed ashore from North Carolina to New York, 10 times normal levels. In Maryland, 18 have been found dead since July 1, with most of those in the past few weeks. The virus could remain a threat to the dolphin population through next spring, the scientists said. The most promising theory is that the dolphin population gradually lost resistance to the disease, known as morbillivirus, since it caused a similar epidemic in the late 1980s.
NEWS
By JOAN BECK | February 11, 1992
Chicago. -- Is there ever reason to wipe out the last survivors of a life form, to terminate forever, deliberately and with cold calculation, living things that can never be duplicated?What if the life forms might possibly be useful against enemies in some future war? What if they contain genetic secrets still undiscovered or unimagined? What if some day there might be a use for these organisms after they are extinct?Unbelievably, such questions are still being raised about the planned execution -- now expected by December 1993 -- of the last known smallpox virus.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 15, 1995
KIKWIT, Zaire -- Sister Dinarosa Belleri, an Italian nursing nun who devoted nearly three decades to serving the poor and sick here, had an unusual funeral yesterday in the sad and dusty graveyard behind the city's cathedral.The coffin came on a hospital gurney. The five pallbearers wore full-length green gowns, heavy plastic goggles, surgical face masks, white helmets, thick gloves and knee-high rubber boots. They nearly dropped the casket before nervously lowering it into the freshly dug grave.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John R. Alden and John R. Alden,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2002
Science Fictions: A Scientific Mystery, A Massive Cover-up, and the Dark Legacy of Robert Gallo, by John Crewdson. Little, Brown. 670 pages. $27.95. Fifteen years ago, Robert Gallo was a star. A researcher at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., he was famed as the discoverer of HTLV-3, the virus that causes AIDS. Gallo was collecting $100,000 a year from the key patent on the test for this virus, and he - and everyone else in the medical world - figured he would win the Nobel Prize.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Officials at two Washington, D.C.-area hospitals said Friday they had isolated patients over fears of Ebola after the nation's first case of the deadly virus was confirmed in Dallas this week. But officials at one of the hospitals, Shady Grove Adventist Hospital in Rockville, determined late Friday that their patient had malaria, not Ebola, hospital officials said in a statement late Friday. Howard University Hospital quarantined a patient who had recently traveled to Nigeria out of "an abundance of caution," officials said.
HEALTH
Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
An American physician exposed to the Ebola virus in Sierra Leone is expected to be admitted to the National Institutes of Health, officials at the Bethesda-based agency said Saturday in a statement. NIH officials said that the patient, who was volunteering in an Ebola treatment unit in Sierra Leone, is expected to be admitted to the NIH Clinical Center for observation as well as to take part in a clinical study. Officials offered no additional information about the patient. "Out of an abundance of caution, the patient will be admitted to the NIH Clinical Center's special clinical studies unit that is specifically designed to provide high-level isolation capabilities and is staffed by infectious diseases and critical care specialists," NIH officials said.
NEWS
Sheila Durant | September 14, 2014
Like many Americans, we in Maryland have watched and listened to the graphic daily news stories chronicling Ebola's escalating devastation in Liberia and other West African nations. Our hearts break as we witness the deaths of innocent Liberians and courageous health-care providers. And we wonder: How can one of the world's poorest countries, whose people and infrastructure remain devastated from over a decade of civil war, hold up against the ferocity of the worst Ebola epidemic ever?
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
State health officials reported Thursday they have confirmed the first case of West Nile Virus in Maryland for the year. The infected adult lives in the suburbs of Washington. The virus has also been detected in a Washington-area horse, and in special mosquito traps placed in Harford, Montgomery, Prince George's and Talbot counties. Officials at the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said the human case was not unexpected - there were 16 reported cases last year. But they reminded people to take precautions by avoiding areas where mosquitoes are prevalent, covering their skin with clothes and hats, using insect repellent, and if possible, avoiding outdoor activities during mosquitoes' most active times at dusk and dawn.
HEALTH
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
As the Ebola virus ravages West Africa, two American health workers who contracted the disease in Liberia were airlifted back to the United States to be treated with an experimental drug. They have since recovered. But colleagues of a doctor in Sierra Leone, stricken as he led his country's fight against the virus, decided against giving him the same medicine. He has since died. The worst Ebola outbreak in history, combined with the existence, in small amounts, of untested drugs that might prove effective in combating it, is raising questions about the ethics of fighting an epidemic.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
Faced with the threats of viruses like H1N1 influenza and SARS in recent years, scientists including the University of Maryland's Dr. Robert Gallo sought a way to prepare for future outbreaks - founding the Baltimore-based Global Virus Network in 2011. The network aims to address challenges in virus treatment and to prepare the world for potential pandemics, doing so through research, training and advocacy, said its president, Sharon Hrynkow. Organizations like Gallo's Institute of Human Virology at the university's School of Medicine, and others around the world collaborate through the network.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 7, 1999
International Business Machines Corp. said yesterday that several thousand of its Aptiva personal computers may have a virus that can shut down the PC. Aptivas that may be affected include models 240, 301, 520 and 580, built between March 5 and 17. The virus is spread when some files are transferred from one PC to another. The bug may shut down the machine if the PC's calendar reads April 26 of any year. Pub Date: 4/07/99
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 25, 2006
Researchers have found a previously unknown virus in some men with prostate cancer, a discovery that could lead to better understanding and treatment of the disease, the most common type of cancer among men. The discoverers do not know exactly why the virus is present in the men, but "there is now a suggestion that prostate cancer could be caused by an infectious disease," said Dr. Eric Klein of the Cleveland Clinic, who reported the discovery yesterday at...
NEWS
By D. A. Henderson | August 6, 2014
The only known stocks of the deadly smallpox virus are now kept in two designated research laboratories, one in Russia and one in the United States. This has troubled many who believe that destruction of the virus would provide greater assurance that it would never again threaten the world. Some scientists, however, insist that the intact smallpox virus is essential for their studies of new vaccines - even though the vaccines themselves are entirely different viruses. The decision to destroy the virus has thus been debated and postponed repeatedly in the World Health Assembly over the past 15 years.
NEWS
August 4, 2014
The U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit that officially opened today in Washington is as notable for what isn't on the agenda as for what is. The meeting between President Barack Obama and more than 40 African heads of state has been billed as forum for talks on security issues, foreign investment and economic development on the continent. But so far, at least, the recent outbreak of deadly Ebola virus in three African nations has remained absent from the official agenda. Mr. Obama needs to take this opportunity to strengthen cooperation between the U.S. and its African partners in efforts to bring the epidemic under control and provide the resources needed to prevent its spread.
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