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NEWS
May 29, 2013
Back in the early 1960s, Americans had to learn a new level of tolerance. People of color would no longer take a back seat to anyone. In the late 1960s and '70s, we again had to learn tolerance as young folks let their hair grow and voiced opinions on national and international policy. We called them hippies. Now we are back in school again. Gay people are demanding their rights. So what are we to do? We could quit the Boy Scouts, the Lions Club, The Optimists Club, The Rotary Club, etc. No more public pools, libraries, churches, public schools and so on. But what good would come of all that?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 1, 2014
I enjoyed and agree with commentator Lynne Agress' essay on the value of writing ( "The presentation dilemma," July 28). Nobody stated it more succinctly or perceptively than Sir Francis Bacon: "Reading maketh a full man, conference (speaking) a ready man, and writing an exact man. " Art Moorshead, Lutherville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
By Joanne Jacobs | March 14, 1994
I AM NOW an expert on virtue.I'm against it.I know I'm an expert because I was invited to speak on virtue by Santa Clara (Calif.) University's Center for Applied Ethics. The invitation came by virtue of my having written about William Bennett's "Book of Virtues" in a column.OK, I'm not really against virtue, personal or civic.Virtue is good, by definition. I'm against the use of virtue in politics, in particular its use as a substitute for politics.Mirror, mirror on the wall, who's the purest of them all?
NEWS
By Hugh Bethell | February 5, 2014
The Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners is currently interviewing for a new CEO. On behalf of downtown parents with children in city schools, I'd like to suggest a few traits the new hire should not have: Patience: Our school system made remarkable strides while Andrés Alonso was in charge, but we still have a long way to go. Graduation rates have improved, but thousands still leave the system without basic skills. Test scores are better, but there is still an unacceptable gap between white middle class students and almost everyone else.
NEWS
By ROBERT RUBY and ROBERT RUBY,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1996
"Echoes of an Autobiography," by Naguib Mahfouz. Doubleday. 118 pages. $19.95Naguib Mahfouz writes in his novels of Cairo but always casts that overbright, crowded, exhausting megalopolis in shadow. Mahfouz' Cairo is a maze of alleys and muffled interiors. Characters are choked by dust, choked by poverty, by deadening jobs. Now, in this unsettling, affecting collection of parables presented as "echoes" of autobiography, Mahfouz explores old age and memory. He examines them as if these were other wondrous, mysterious cities, where the sounds again are muffled, the shadows darker.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | August 13, 1997
He wasn't born here, he didn't play here, yet he became a legend here. That was the magic of Rex Barney. He was more than just a public-address announcer or a radio talk-show host. He was part of the fabric, part of the family, part of the grand Baltimore baseball experience. He became an institution by being a nice guy.You gotta have heart, and Rex had one of the biggest, even when the rest of his body was crumbling around him. He'd sign autographs from his seat in the press box. He'd bring boxes of Berger cookies to his young radio producers.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | May 9, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Some of his fellow moral crusaders express disappointment that William J. Bennett admits to big-bucks gambling and a high-roller life at big-time casinos. I'm disappointed that he's giving it up. After all, Mr. Bennett pointed out when first confronted with his expensive hobby that his gambling apparently was legal, harmless to his family and between him and other consenting adults. I would be delighted to let Mr. Bennett, former secretary of education and author of the best-selling Book of Virtues, gamble all he wants without a peep of protest, if he would just give Sen. Rick Santorum and other modern-day Puritans a spirited Bennett-style lecture on the virtue of staying out of other people's personal business.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2002
A federal appeals court ruled yesterday that substantial portions of an investigative report that accuses a former top government immigration lawyer of exercising "improper influence" in the granting of visas to foreign investors must be made public. The ruling, issued in New York City by a three-judge panel of the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals, said there was "a substantial amount of evidence" against Paul W. Virtue, the former general counsel of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | July 21, 1996
This medium-bodied California cabernet won't win prizes for complexity, but it offers pure black cherry fruit and admirable balance and intensity. Plus, it has the virtue of widespread availability. It's an excellent summer-weight cabernet that wouldn't be out of place at a barbecue.Pub Date: 7/21/96
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and By Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2001
A former top immigration official who was the subject of a lengthy internal probe is now actively working for the same promoters of an investor visa program he was accused of improperly assisting. Paul W. Virtue, former general counsel for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service and now a private attorney, recently contacted former INS colleagues on behalf of a firm that has been marketing a contentious investor visa program. Bo Cooper, INS general counsel, said Virtue called him two to three weeks ago inquiring about what the agency's position would be on proposed legislation that would benefit investors in AIS Inc., also known as American Immigration Services, which is based in Greenbelt.
NEWS
By Matthew VanDyke | September 9, 2013
When President Barack Obama received the Nobel Peace Prize in 2009, even he was surprised. Mr. Obama's winning of the prize was rightly controversial - after nine months in office it was difficult to determine what exactly had warranted it - but he wasn't the first U.S. president to win the award nor was he the first for whom the honor struck many as odd. Theodore Roosevelt, swaggering Rough Rider, big game hunter and jungle explorer - a man who...
NEWS
May 29, 2013
Back in the early 1960s, Americans had to learn a new level of tolerance. People of color would no longer take a back seat to anyone. In the late 1960s and '70s, we again had to learn tolerance as young folks let their hair grow and voiced opinions on national and international policy. We called them hippies. Now we are back in school again. Gay people are demanding their rights. So what are we to do? We could quit the Boy Scouts, the Lions Club, The Optimists Club, The Rotary Club, etc. No more public pools, libraries, churches, public schools and so on. But what good would come of all that?
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
The sweat and nerves that accompanied St. Mary's journey to the NCAA tournament turned into a leisurely jaunt after the team had upset reigning national champion Salisbury, 13-11, in Sunday's final of the Capital Athletic Conference tournament and earned the automatic qualifier. It was a relaxing moment for a Seahawks program that had never advanced to the NCAA tournament until Sunday. “Well, it definitely took a little pressure off,” coach Chris Hasbrouck said with a chuckle Monday afternoon.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
It seems Easter was a field day for attacking Dr. Ben Carson for his conservative views ("Ben Carson's biblically based conservatism," March 31.) Columnist Dan Rodricks claimed he was not surprised by Dr. Carson's equating gays with pedophiles and people who have sex with animals. Mr. Rodricks then delved into a 2008 radio interview for more dirt to support his critique of Dr. Carson's conservatism, showing how Dr. Carson used the Bible to support such things as corporal punishment by parents and as justification of a flat tax. Well perhaps more people need to be seeking answers in the Bible or in their faith.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | October 30, 2012
Since World War II, Americans have tended to elect middle class presidents. With the exception of the two Bushes - the first of whom lost his second election, the second of whom "lost" his first - both parties succeeded by nominating candidates from modest backgrounds: Republicans Dwight Eisenhower, Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan were hardly products of affluence, nor were Democrats Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton or Barack Obama. Mitt Romney was born to both political and economic privilege.
NEWS
By David Horsey | October 2, 2012
It was a clear sign the campaign has gone on too long when I had a dream about Mitt Romney a couple of nights ago. Other than the fact that the Romney summoned from my unconscious was sitting at a breakfast table with me and was willingly answering questions, the dream was pretty realistic. The candidate was dressed in his ubiquitous Brooks Brothers checked shirt and relaxed-fit jeans. He seemed relaxed, too. But when I asked him a softball question about the personal strains of campaigning, he answered with a generic policy statement.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2002
Early last month, a former top government lawyer got an especially warm greeting from a Senate panel considering a major overhaul of immigration laws. He was introduced as a "highly respected" expert whose insights were valued. That May 2 appearance by Paul W. Virtue, former chief counsel of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, was one of many he has made since leaving the agency, where he worked for 16 years, ending in 1999. Virtue, a partner in a top Washington law firm, also has made frequent appearances on national radio and television programs and is frequently quoted in newspaper articles.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | March 24, 1993
A JUDGE in Shreveport, La., has ruled that teachin abstinence may not be part of a sex education program for high school students. Abstinence, said the judge (urged on by Planned Parenthood, which filed the suit), is a religiously based virtue. To teach it in public schools is to violate the separation of church and state.Now, before you laugh, consider this: It has long been illegal to display the Ten Commandments in public classrooms, and the Supreme Court recently held that a milquetoast, ecumenical, watered-down invocation of God's blessing on graduating high school seniors was also violative of the Constitution.
EXPLORE
September 15, 2011
In my last column, "Medical-religious alliance can address elderly's health needs," I indicated that my next column (this one) would be a companion piece on "health ministries in Howard County churches. " Unfortunately I just couldn't fit all the interviews into my work and "retirement" schedule. I will pick up on this topic again and you will see that column very soon. So, I had to regroup in midstream and decided to write about the needy elderly and the need for all persons to treat seniors with respect and to provide them the care they deserve.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Anyone who has closely followed the Orioles this year is likely able to identify one of their biggest problems on offense, and that certainly includes manager Buck Showalter . The hitters just aren't particularly patient, especially in high-leverage situations. Heading into Thursday, Mark Reynolds was sixth in the American League in pitches seen per at-bat with 4.26 and led the team in walks with 48 this year, more than twice as many as any other Oriole. Luke Scott (4.16 pitches per at-bat)
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