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By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 11, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Behold the world -- the "virtual" world, that is -- according to Newt Gingrich.At a conference here on "Democracy in Virtual America," the technologically hip House speaker and members of his brain trust talked of "byte cities" and "teleputers" and outlined the Information Age vision that has shaped Mr. Gingrich's 21st-century sensibility.As several audience members took notes on laptop computers, Mr. Gingrich's gurus-in-chief, futurists Alvin and Heidi Toffler, described their "wave" theory of history.
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BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | October 3, 2013
The Silk Road case shined a light on the deep underbelly of the web -- exposing many casual Internet users to unfamiliar terms like Deep Web, Tor and Bitcoin. So we asked Johns Hopkins cryptography professor Matthew Green -- who recently was in the news himself for his writings on the NSA -- to help break down this shadowy virtual world for our readers. Q: What exactly is Deep Web? The Deep Web means two things. In some cases it's used to refer to the part of the web that isn't reached by search engines.
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BUSINESS
By Alana Semuels and Alana Semuels,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 23, 2008
Stephanie Roberts knew Second Life was just a computer game, but she couldn't resist the virtual world's promise of a real-world interest rate of more than 40 percent. The 33-year-old from Chicago, who played the game as a raven-haired vixen called Zania Turner, deposited $140 in Ginko Financial and waited for the money to grow. Instead, it vanished five months ago when Ginko, perhaps the first Ponzi scheme perpetrated by three-dimensional online avatars, left Second Life. "I was foolish," Roberts said.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2010
Laugh at them if you must, those Japanese men who are so serious about playing a dating video game that they recently took it one crazy step further: They took their digital dollies on a real trip to a honeymoon resort town outside Tokyo. But I think they're onto something. In case you missed this latest dispatch from the world of Japanese wackiness, a recent Wall Street Journal article reported on a wildly popular Nintendo DS game called Love Plus that is available only in Japan.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | October 25, 2007
Brad Reiss quit his day job as marketing and entertainment director for a restaurant group in Baltimore to make his living in a virtual world called Second Life. "It was a good job I was giving up," Reiss said. "As I was working there, I started to get into Second Life, and I realized the amazing potential. At the point I quit, I wasn't even close to making enough to survive on. Once I was able to devote a good 40 hours a week, the possibilities opened up." Reiss, 28, along with some of the world's most successful companies - including Toyota and International Business Machines - see vast potential in Second Life.
NEWS
By ECONOMIST NEWS SERVICE | January 8, 2006
The sci-fi dream of computer-generated virtual reality - so familiar to readers of Neuromancer and viewers of The Matrix - has finally come true. But, as is often the case with guesses about future technologies, it has not come true in quite the way that many people expected. While scientists developed sensory-input devices to mimic the sensations of a virtual world, the games industry eschewed this hardware-based approach in favor of creating alternative realities through emotionally engaging software.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Peggy Rogers and Peggy Rogers,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 1, 2004
Little virtual people in little virtual homes, The Sims are so lifelike that players of the personal-computer game often fashion characters after themselves. Some have rewritten their own troubled childhoods and marriages. And some take their frustrations out on the little people. "Two of the most fundamental truths about people is that we love to create and we love to destroy," says Jon "PyroFalkon" Habib, who writes a free and popular strategic Sims manual posted on many Web sites.
NEWS
By Troy McCullough and Troy McCullough,Sun Columnist | January 28, 2007
A company's reaction to its critics can tell us a lot, and in that regard, the owners of the virtual world Second Life told us plenty last week. Created and run by Linden Lab, Second Life is an anomaly among immersive online sites: It's often as scorned as it is popular. Its growth since its public launch in 2003 has been phenomenal, claiming more than 1 million "residents," and those numbers are all the more impressive considering that Second Life is not a game by traditional standards.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2000
In 1991, Baltimore-born Marc Singer graduated from college in the midst of a recession, knowing little of computers or e-mail and unable to find a job. By 1999, at age 30, he was running togglethis -- a struggling Internet company whose unique interactive technology threatened to shake up the online world -- if it managed to survive. Marc's story -- told in nine episodes beginning next Sunday in Arts & Society (and online at www.Sunspot.net) -- is a look inside the real world of the virtual world: from starving entrepreneurs with big ideas to the corporate "suits" who offer them big dollars, from a Bill-Gates-hating programmer named Raj to a feisty interactive cartoon beaver named Bozlo.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun Columnist | May 30, 2007
One job candidate changed clothes in the middle of the interview. Another kept bumping into walls. These actions would be considered faux pas in real life. But in the 3-D virtual world of Second Life, where Internet users act out parallel lives through pixilated characters known as avatars, interview rules are little bit looser. Avatars communicate via instant message chats. This month, six companies participated in what was billed as the first virtual job fair in the digital universe.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | April 7, 2009
Towson University President Robert L. Caret was standing in the middle of a sunny atrium in the school's virtual online campus, holding forth on student life, when he was attacked. An avatar - or online representation of a person - in a blue dress walked right into him. "An avatar just attacked me, I think," Caret said, laughing. "I'm hoping it was unintentional." Caret holds monthly "study breaks," where he meets with students to answer questions and hear their concerns. Last week, for the first time, he met with students in the virtual world of Second Life - an online program populated by its own world of animated people and places.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | March 27, 2009
"Virtual instruction" is set to become a regular part of learning this fall in a Baltimore County school. The school district has teamed up with universities, defense contractors and a video game developer for help with a high-tech program designed to breathe life into textbook lessons and challenge students with the kind of problem-solving that employers might expect. "We wanted students to have an experience that would be more typical of what they'd have, hands-on, in the real world," said Maria Lowry, principal of Chesapeake High School, which is to pilot a new virtual classroom.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | November 2, 2008
Jean Tyrrell wanted to find activities that would allow students in the autism program at Patterson Mill Middle/High School to be more physically active during the school day. After researching some ideas, Tyrrell said she purchased a Nintendo Wii video game console with a grant that she received. "The kids really like Wii," said Tyrrell, a physical-education teacher. "And I think it's great. It gives the children with autism an age-appropriate leisure activity to do." Since the game was purchased, the children have all learned to play it, said Carolyn Trovinger, who teaches the middle school autism program.
BUSINESS
By Alana Semuels and Alana Semuels,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 23, 2008
Stephanie Roberts knew Second Life was just a computer game, but she couldn't resist the virtual world's promise of a real-world interest rate of more than 40 percent. The 33-year-old from Chicago, who played the game as a raven-haired vixen called Zania Turner, deposited $140 in Ginko Financial and waited for the money to grow. Instead, it vanished five months ago when Ginko, perhaps the first Ponzi scheme perpetrated by three-dimensional online avatars, left Second Life. "I was foolish," Roberts said.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | October 25, 2007
Brad Reiss quit his day job as marketing and entertainment director for a restaurant group in Baltimore to make his living in a virtual world called Second Life. "It was a good job I was giving up," Reiss said. "As I was working there, I started to get into Second Life, and I realized the amazing potential. At the point I quit, I wasn't even close to making enough to survive on. Once I was able to devote a good 40 hours a week, the possibilities opened up." Reiss, 28, along with some of the world's most successful companies - including Toyota and International Business Machines - see vast potential in Second Life.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun Columnist | May 30, 2007
One job candidate changed clothes in the middle of the interview. Another kept bumping into walls. These actions would be considered faux pas in real life. But in the 3-D virtual world of Second Life, where Internet users act out parallel lives through pixilated characters known as avatars, interview rules are little bit looser. Avatars communicate via instant message chats. This month, six companies participated in what was billed as the first virtual job fair in the digital universe.
NEWS
By Troy McCullough and Troy McCullough,Sun Columnist | March 11, 2007
Second Life continues to grow at a phenomenal rate, but trouble has been bubbling to the surface of late. The utopian visions of the virtual world's founders are being threatened by militant factions demanding more of a say in shaping their virtual lives and by roving bands of "griefers" intent on causing mischief and chaos wherever they can. Now claiming more than 4.3 million "residents," Second Life has been basking under the near-constant glow of...
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | April 7, 2009
Towson University President Robert L. Caret was standing in the middle of a sunny atrium in the school's virtual online campus, holding forth on student life, when he was attacked. An avatar - or online representation of a person - in a blue dress walked right into him. "An avatar just attacked me, I think," Caret said, laughing. "I'm hoping it was unintentional." Caret holds monthly "study breaks," where he meets with students to answer questions and hear their concerns. Last week, for the first time, he met with students in the virtual world of Second Life - an online program populated by its own world of animated people and places.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | May 15, 2007
Stephan Dowler created a digital character named Estephan Dollinger and fretted over his alter ego's hair and wardrobe. And he spent six hours exploring a virtual world called Second Life, where Internet users act out parallel lives. After all, even in this three-dimensional social networking space, Dowler wants his virtual persona, known as an avatar, to look and act professionally. That's because Dowler, or rather Dollinger, will be teleported to a virtual island on the digital universe for a job interview today.
NEWS
By Troy McCullough and Troy McCullough,Sun Columnist | March 11, 2007
Second Life continues to grow at a phenomenal rate, but trouble has been bubbling to the surface of late. The utopian visions of the virtual world's founders are being threatened by militant factions demanding more of a say in shaping their virtual lives and by roving bands of "griefers" intent on causing mischief and chaos wherever they can. Now claiming more than 4.3 million "residents," Second Life has been basking under the near-constant glow of...
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