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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2007
Cho Seung-Hui, the 23-year-old student identified as the shooter in a deadly rampage at Virginia Tech University, apparently broke no laws in acquiring at least one of the weapons that left 33 people dead. Under Virginia's gun laws, Cho was legally entitled to walk into Roanoke Firearms in Roanoke, Va., last month and walk out with a Glock 19 9 mm semiautomatic pistol the same day. Though he has been described as a disturbed loner, his behavior aroused no suspicions on the part of the shop owner, who described Cho as a "nice, clean-cut college kid."
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
A Virginia appeals court on Tuesday upheld the second-degree murder conviction of a former University of Virginia lacrosse player found guilty in the beating death of his ex-girlfriend, Yeardley Love, in May 2010. George W. Huguely V's lawyers appealed his 2012 conviction in the murder of Love, 22, who was a member of the U.Va. women's lacrosse team and a native of Cockeysville. Love was found beaten in her apartment with the door kicked in just weeks before she was scheduled to graduate from U.Va.
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NEWS
By SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | February 2, 1997
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- When California voters passed Proposition 215 in November, supporters proudly declared the state to be in the vanguard of the medical marijuana movement.In fact, at least one other state got a head start - by nearly two decades.Without a whiff of controversy, the Virginia Legislature passed a law in 1979 allowing doctors to prescribe marijuana to treat glaucoma and to help cancer patients cope with the side effects of chemotherapy.The law was passed as a small part of a sweeping overhaul of the state's drug laws.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
The report by Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot on the economic benefits to Maryland from a post-Labor Day school start deserves far more respect, attention and consideration than given to it in a recent editorial in The Sun ("One week and counting," Aug. 19). The comptroller's report follows approval of legislation in the last General Assembly session to establish a task force to study a post-Labor Day start date for Maryland public schools. It is worth noting that following public hearings in both the House and the Senate, the legislation calling for this study passed the Senate 46 to 1, passed the House of Delegates 124 to 6 and was signed into law by Gov. Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
April 24, 1992
Howard H. Conaway, a retired partner in the law firm of Frank, Bernstein, Conaway and Goldman, died early yesterday after an apparent heart attack on his way home after visiting friends.Mr. Conaway, who was 82 and lived in the Warrington Condominiums, retired about nine years ago but had remained active in the firm he joined in 1932.A trial lawyer, he was the chief rationing attorney in Maryland for the Office of Price Administration early in World War II before enlisting in the Army.Later, as an Army officer, he was decorated for finding records of the German Alien Property Custodian.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- For the first time, a federal appellate judge has upheld a state law restricting a form of late-term abortion, a ruling that conflicts with findings by other federal judges that struck down similar laws in two other states.The decision Tuesday by Judge J. Michael Luttig of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upholds a Virginia law enacted in April barring a late-term procedure that opponents call "partial-birth" abortion.Luttig reversed a federal district judge who had found the law unconstitutional, a ruling consistent with recent appellate court decisions in Ohio and Wisconsin.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 18, 2003
FAIRFAX, Va. - A Circuit Court judge refused yesterday to eliminate the prospect of a death sentence for teen-age sniper suspect Lee Boyd Malvo, the younger in a pair of men accused in a three-week shooting rampage that left 10 people dead in the Washington area nearly a year ago. Malvo's lawyers had argued that foreign countries and international treaties banning the death penalty for juveniles combined to rule out execution for Malvo, who was 17...
NEWS
May 1, 2003
THE HUMORIST Dave Barry recently defined spammers -- sending out millions of bulk, unsolicited and often fraudulent e-mails -- as "the mutant spawn of a bizarre reproductive act involving a telemarketer, Larry Flynt, a tapeworm, and an executive of the third-class mail industry." Trouble is, spam is no joke, having exploded so much over the last year or so that it's become much less of a mere annoyance and much more of a costly monster begging for federal regulation -- which may be coming later this year.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 23, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Turning aside a constitutional challenge to a recent Virginia law aimed at curbing teen-agers' abortions, the Supreme Court left states yesterday with more leeway to require that parents be told when a minor daughter seeks to end a pregnancy.The justices did not issue a full-scale ruling on the 1997 Virginia law, but they did refuse to hear an appeal of a lower court ruling that interpreted the law very broadly so that it may require parental notice from a minor mature enough to choose abortion on her own.The lower court was the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., which decides federal law issues for Maryland and neighboring mid-Atlantic states.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 29, 2000
WASHINGTON - In a significant turnabout, spurred by a recent Supreme Court ruling, a federal appeals court barred Virginia yesterday from enforcing its ban on "partial-birth" abortions. The decision by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond - the appeals court that decides federal cases arising in Maryland and other mid-Atlantic states - lifted an order it issued 10 months ago putting the Virginia law into effect even after a District Court had found it unconstitutional. The state's law thus will be on hold until the appeals court reviews the judge's decision that struck it down.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2012
Katherine Williams, a second-year student at the University of Virginia, never had the opportunity to meet Yeardley Love. But like other students who arrived on campus after Love's death in May 2010, Williams lives with her legacy. "I took a class on women's health," Williams, 20, said, "and we discussed what happened here. " What happened was Love's murder at the hands of her one-time boyfriend, George Huguely. He was convicted last week during a trial in which testimony characterized him as an out-of-control drinker who had previously physically attacked and threatened her. He faces up to 26 years in prison.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2007
Cho Seung-Hui, the 23-year-old student identified as the shooter in a deadly rampage at Virginia Tech University, apparently broke no laws in acquiring at least one of the weapons that left 33 people dead. Under Virginia's gun laws, Cho was legally entitled to walk into Roanoke Firearms in Roanoke, Va., last month and walk out with a Glock 19 9 mm semiautomatic pistol the same day. Though he has been described as a disturbed loner, his behavior aroused no suspicions on the part of the shop owner, who described Cho as a "nice, clean-cut college kid."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 18, 2003
FAIRFAX, Va. - A Circuit Court judge refused yesterday to eliminate the prospect of a death sentence for teen-age sniper suspect Lee Boyd Malvo, the younger in a pair of men accused in a three-week shooting rampage that left 10 people dead in the Washington area nearly a year ago. Malvo's lawyers had argued that foreign countries and international treaties banning the death penalty for juveniles combined to rule out execution for Malvo, who was 17...
NEWS
May 1, 2003
THE HUMORIST Dave Barry recently defined spammers -- sending out millions of bulk, unsolicited and often fraudulent e-mails -- as "the mutant spawn of a bizarre reproductive act involving a telemarketer, Larry Flynt, a tapeworm, and an executive of the third-class mail industry." Trouble is, spam is no joke, having exploded so much over the last year or so that it's become much less of a mere annoyance and much more of a costly monster begging for federal regulation -- which may be coming later this year.
NEWS
November 10, 2002
MAYBE ATTORNEY General John Ashcroft is just a great visionary, a man whose interpretations of the rule of law defy common understanding because they're a reflection of his bold legal imagination. A guy who sees the law not for what it is, but for what it could be: a way to advance society beyond troublesome notions such as caution or justice, and toward more comforting values such as expediency. That's about as generous as we can be in describing the process that led to two Virginia counties getting first crack at suspected D.C. snipers John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 29, 2000
WASHINGTON - In a significant turnabout, spurred by a recent Supreme Court ruling, a federal appeals court barred Virginia yesterday from enforcing its ban on "partial-birth" abortions. The decision by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond - the appeals court that decides federal cases arising in Maryland and other mid-Atlantic states - lifted an order it issued 10 months ago putting the Virginia law into effect even after a District Court had found it unconstitutional. The state's law thus will be on hold until the appeals court reviews the judge's decision that struck it down.
NEWS
November 10, 2002
MAYBE ATTORNEY General John Ashcroft is just a great visionary, a man whose interpretations of the rule of law defy common understanding because they're a reflection of his bold legal imagination. A guy who sees the law not for what it is, but for what it could be: a way to advance society beyond troublesome notions such as caution or justice, and toward more comforting values such as expediency. That's about as generous as we can be in describing the process that led to two Virginia counties getting first crack at suspected D.C. snipers John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
The report by Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot on the economic benefits to Maryland from a post-Labor Day school start deserves far more respect, attention and consideration than given to it in a recent editorial in The Sun ("One week and counting," Aug. 19). The comptroller's report follows approval of legislation in the last General Assembly session to establish a task force to study a post-Labor Day start date for Maryland public schools. It is worth noting that following public hearings in both the House and the Senate, the legislation calling for this study passed the Senate 46 to 1, passed the House of Delegates 124 to 6 and was signed into law by Gov. Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 23, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Turning aside a constitutional challenge to a recent Virginia law aimed at curbing teen-agers' abortions, the Supreme Court left states yesterday with more leeway to require that parents be told when a minor daughter seeks to end a pregnancy.The justices did not issue a full-scale ruling on the 1997 Virginia law, but they did refuse to hear an appeal of a lower court ruling that interpreted the law very broadly so that it may require parental notice from a minor mature enough to choose abortion on her own.The lower court was the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., which decides federal law issues for Maryland and neighboring mid-Atlantic states.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- For the first time, a federal appellate judge has upheld a state law restricting a form of late-term abortion, a ruling that conflicts with findings by other federal judges that struck down similar laws in two other states.The decision Tuesday by Judge J. Michael Luttig of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upholds a Virginia law enacted in April barring a late-term procedure that opponents call "partial-birth" abortion.Luttig reversed a federal district judge who had found the law unconstitutional, a ruling consistent with recent appellate court decisions in Ohio and Wisconsin.
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