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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2011
On a YouTube video, Tona Brown is first seen playing some Bach on the violin. Then she breaks into song, delivering "Climb Ev'ry Mountain" in a full-throated mezzo-soprano voice. That Rodgers and Hammerstein classic makes a particularly fitting anthem for Brown, who has faced her share of hurdles. None of them, it seems, have fazed this transgender musician who moved to Baltimore about a year ago. "You can't tell me I can't do something," Brown says with a broad smile, interviewed on a warm afternoon in the rowhouse she shares with a roommate half a block from Lake Montebello.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014
Ellie Cattle has an impressive collection of musical talents: violin, viola, cello, and most recently, guitar and mandolin. And she'll show off her talent this weekend at the Privateer Festival in Fells Point (Friday-Sunday; fellspointmainstreet.org), playing violin for award-winning group the Pyrates Royale. You can check out the group performing traditional maritime, Irish and English folk music on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. and 2:45 p.m. or Sunday at 1:30 p.m. and 5:15 p.m. Cattle joined the group as the fiddler after her old private viola teacher vacated the position for a long-term gig out of town.
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By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2010
A 68-year-old music teacher was sentenced Friday to nine months in the Howard County Detention Center for sexually abusing an 11-year-old girl who took violin lessons in his home. Ming Yueh Liang of the 2800 block of Deerfield Drive in Ellicott City was convicted by a jury in February of two counts of fourth-degree sexual offense and two counts of second-degree assault. He was sentenced to 18 months, half of which were suspended. The abuse took place in April and May of 2009, prosecutors said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Isidor Saslav, a former Baltimore Symphony Orchestra concertmaster and Peabody Institute violin teacher, died of complications from cancer Jan. 26 at a hospital in Tyler, Texas. The former Mount Washington resident was 74. Born in Jerusalem, he moved with his family to Detroit as a young boy and studied violin under Detroit Symphony concertmaster Mischa Mischakoff. Family members said at 17 he became one of the youngest members of the Detroit Symphony. He earned a bachelor's degree in music at Wayne State University and a doctorate from Indiana University, where he wrote his thesis on the string quartets of Franz Josef Haydn.
FEATURES
December 16, 1998
Editor's note: Ten instruments take their parts one by one in a musical performance.With mournful moan and silken tone,Itself alone comes ONE TROMBONE.Gliding, sliding, high notes go low;ONE TROMBONE is playing SOLO.Next, a TRUMPET comes along,And sings and stings its swinging song.It joins TROMBONE, no more alone,And ONE and TWO-O, they're a DUO.Fine FRENCH HORN, its valves all oiled,Bright and brassy, loops all coiled,Golden yellow; joins its fellows.TWO, now THREE-O, what a TRIO!Now, a mellow friend, the CELLO,Neck extended, bows a "hello";End pin set upon the floor,It makes up a QUARTET - that's FOUR.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 1996
John Adams's two-year-old Violin Concerto made its first local appearance Thursday evening in Meyerhoff Hall in a masterful, thought-provoking performance by soloist Herbert Greenberg and the Baltimore Symphony.This concerto by the composer best known for such operas as "Nixon in China" and "Klinghoffer" already has received a number of performances. This is partly because the original commission was divided among the Minnesota Orchestra, the London Symphony and the New York City Ballet.This is fearsome music for any violinist.
NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff writer | December 4, 1990
Mac MacWilliams didn't mind the taste of his own blood.Even as it trailed from a cut high on his left cheekbone, mixed with the perspiration on his face and dripped into the corner of his mouth, he didn't mind.For MacWilliams had just grappled his way to a 5-4 victory over Archbishop Curley's tough Gary Myrncza for the 135-pound title in last Saturday's Curley Invitational wrestling tournament. The victory avenged an unpalatable overtime loss to Myrncza a year ago that eliminated MacWilliams in the tournament's consolation semifinals.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 1997
The repertoire of 20th century French music received a persuasive presentation Sunday afternoon from the violin-and-piano duo of Adele Auriol and Bernard Fauchet as part of the Chamber Music Society of Baltimore series.The program commenced with Olivier Messiaen's "Theme et variations," one of the composer's more subtle scores and one strongly influenced by Debussy. Auriol perfectly spun the variations in a brilliant arc that kept the momentum throughout the score. Her partner was a perfect match, never covering the violin line.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 6, 2002
JOHN SCHMIDT could best be described as a Renaissance man. With degrees in physics and psychology, the Town Center resident works for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. But it's his hobby that truly defines him. Schmidt, 55, is passionate about making violins. Making violins appeals to Schmidt on many levels. "There's the artistic aspect and the historical aspect," he said. "There is mathematics involved, and the physics of sound. In the varnish, you've got the chemistry.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 17, 1994
Pamela Frank does not expect to tire of playing Mozart."Never!" says the young violinist, who will perform Mozart's Concerto No. 4 with David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony Saturday in Meyerhoff Hall in the orchestra's Summerfest Series."
FEATURES
By Michael Cross-Barnet and By Michael Cross-Barnet | October 29, 2012
From Michael Cross-Barnet: Show of hands, please: How many of you progressive-minded parents out there think it's OK to force a child to take music lessons against his or her will? I'm guessing not too many. Maybe 10 or 15 percent? OK, let's add a few nuances. What if the kid is good - really good? What if the lessons in question are not only high quality, but free? Now, here's the kicker, and this will bring a glimmer of recognition in more than a few readers: What if the child in question is one who rarely, if ever, is willing to try new things without prompting?
NEWS
July 1, 2012
TOM ROBERTS, 75, Smithsonian's 'Mr. Anonymous' The name "Tom Roberts" appears on no plaque in the Smithsonian Institution's musical instruments collection. At no concert, even when Mr. Roberts was in attendance, did Smithsonian chamber musicians reveal that he was one of their greatest benefactors. Among museum curators, he was known as "Mr. Anonymous. " Only a few of his closest acquaintances knew that for nearly two decades, Mr. Roberts owned one of the most prized instruments in the world — the "Hellier" violin crafted by Antonio Stradivari at the end of the 17th century.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2012
Carl Leo Dietrich, who had been chairman of the music department at what is now McDaniel College and later was a founder of the Columbia Orchestra, died May 24 of a fall at his Naples, Fla., home. The former Columbia resident was 85. "His influence of joyful exuberance is still very much a part of the spirit of music-making here in the department today," said Dr. Margaret Boudreaux, who succeeded Mr. Dietrich as department chair in 1991. "He was my immediate predecessor as chair, and the person that hired me," said Dr. Boudreaux.
EXPLORE
By Kathy Hudsonhudmud@aol.com | February 29, 2012
My earliest memories of music are of my grandmother singing “Once in Royal David City,” as she drove me the half-hour from our house to her apartment, and of listening to my mother's classical record colllection. The minute I took ballet, my friends and I played her 33-rpm recording of Tchaikovsky's “Swan Lake” and “Nutcracker Suite,” and performed in our dining room, where the table was kept to the side. We marched to clear red plastic 45-rpm recordings of John Philip Sousa and sang endlessly Gilbert and Sullivan's “I'm Called Little Buttercup” from records with pictures printed on them.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
The classical music world, ever on the hunt for bright young stars with box office snap, still has some reliably surefire veterans. One of them is Itzhak Perlman, the most popular, widely recognized violinist since Heifetz. Tickets for Perlman's guest stint as soloist and conductor with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra have been scarce for some time, even though, as was the case at his 2010 guest stint with the ensemble, Perlman is doing minimal fiddling. People still want to experience his musicianship, still want to let him know how much he means to them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2011
When he was in his early teens, Andrew Grams saw the sci-fi hit "Jurassic Park. " The visual side of the movie wasn't the only thing that left an impression. "The trumpet theme from the score stuck in my head for the entire summer," said Grams, the Maryland-born conductor who, now in his early 30s, will lead the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra this week in music from that film and others scored by John Williams. "Hearing the music today takes me back," he said, "and I hope it will do that for other people, help them remember who they were when they first saw the movie and heard the music.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | January 17, 1995
CHICAGO -- Since the age of 2, Rachel Barton and her violin have been almost inseparable. She has won international violin competitions, appeared as a soloist with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and recently, at the age of 20, made her debut recording on compact disc.Yesterday morning, in a tragic split-second accident, the instrument that had been her life almost caused her death.Ms. Barton's canvas violin case, which she had slung over her shoulder, became trapped in the closing doors of a Chicago & North Western train at the Elm Street station in north suburban Winnetka.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1998
Edith H. Bergmann, a German army radio operator during World War II who eventually became a wholesaler of violins in Baltimore, died of kidney failure Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Towson resident was 74.Born in Wurzburg, Germany, Ms. Bergmann received her higher education in Munich, where she became fluent in French and English. During World War II, she volunteered in the women's army corps as a radio operator in Berlin. She fled that city in advance of the Russian army but was captured by American troops near the Alps in 1945.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2011
On a YouTube video, Tona Brown is first seen playing some Bach on the violin. Then she breaks into song, delivering "Climb Ev'ry Mountain" in a full-throated mezzo-soprano voice. That Rodgers and Hammerstein classic makes a particularly fitting anthem for Brown, who has faced her share of hurdles. None of them, it seems, have fazed this transgender musician who moved to Baltimore about a year ago. "You can't tell me I can't do something," Brown says with a broad smile, interviewed on a warm afternoon in the rowhouse she shares with a roommate half a block from Lake Montebello.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2011
Globetrotting, Grammy-winning violinist Hilary Hahn will breeze through the region this weekend to play a recital. Her appearance at the Music Center at Strathmore with brilliant pianist Valentina Lisitsa, presented by the Washington Performing Arts Society, is the closest Hahn will be this season to her old stamping ground. The violinist was raised in Baltimore from the age of 3, started her musical studies at the Peabody Institute, and made her orchestral debut with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in 1991.
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