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Violent Offenders

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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley and Delaware Gov. Jack Markell announced Thursday an effort to better share information about violent offenders, adding another jurisdiction to the state's regional partnerships. The new agreement, announced at Salisbury University, will allow parole and probation officials and police in both states to exchange information about daily arrests, and enable the Maryland Division of Parole and Probation to take action if a suspect from Maryland violates the terms of his release in Delaware.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
A little-noticed and highly technical Supreme Court decision is opening the way for dozens of federal inmates from Maryland to seek reduced sentences — even though trial judges found they had violent criminal pasts. For some, the high court decision has already meant that sentences of 15 years and more have been cut substantially. One inmate, for example, saw his sentence reduced from 15 years to about six years; he was released in February. The legal challenges are the latest turn in an ongoing debate over the fairness of long federal prison sentences — a weapon frequently used in Baltimore to combat crime.
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NEWS
July 22, 2013
Public Enemy No. 1, Darryl M. Anderson, was caught in Birmingham, Ala., packing two guns after a year-long search during which he was also accused of committing more violent crimes while on the run ("'Public enemy No. 1' caught," July 17). His criminal record is worth recounting. At 15 he was charged with attempted first-degree murder. The case was dismissed. At 16 he broke into a car and with handgun. For that he was sentenced to three years with all but five days suspended.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Baltimore's nearly $2.2 million proposal to reduce violent crime received preliminary approval from the City Council Monday, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said. The proposal would support Operation CeaseFire, a program aimed at reducing recidivism rates among violent offenders; and a youth center to hold minors who break curfew; and includes $1.2 million in city gambling revenue for overtime and staffing in high-crime areas. As the mayor stressed the need for the supplemental funding at a Monday evening news conference at City Hall, she said less than 1 percent of Western District residents committed more than 60 percent of the killings and more than 70 percent of the nonfatal shootings in that area.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
State officials have invested more manpower and money in an effort to get the most violent offenders sought on warrants off Baltimore's streets. Added Maryland state troopers will join the Warrant Apprehension Task Force, a collaboration of law enforcement agencies, through June in seeking Baltimore suspects in violent crimes such as robbery, assault, gun and sex offenses, domestic violence and more. A grant of nearly $152,000 from the Governor's Office on Crime Control and Prevention will cover overtime costs for the Summer Jumpstart Warrant Initiative.
NEWS
March 27, 2007
Gun violence remains a pernicious, corrosive influence in the life of this city. And we're not just talking about Baltimore's steady run of murders, which are outpacing last year's total. Shootings also are on a steady incline across the city. Certainly, taking guns off the street helps, but it can't be the mainstay of a crime-reduction strategy. The harsh truth is that illegal guns pass through too many hands too quickly. More critical is identifying repeat violent offenders and locking them up. In the city, that can prove troublesome.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2012
When springtime trends showed that 2011 homicides in Maryland would rise by 7 percent, the governor's office set in motion an intensified effort to arrest violent offenders wanted on warrants in areas where most of the state's violent crime occurs: Baltimore City and Prince George's and Baltimore counties. Local and state agencies worked in three phases from the summer through year's end, with more officers and longer hours paid for with $500,000 in federal grants. When it was over, 2,200 people had been arrested.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
The Baltimore County Police Department has been recognized by an international police organization for its use of a statewide program designed to keep watch on the most violent offenders. The International Association of Chiefs of Police awarded the Webber Seavey Award to Chief James W. Johnson for using the Violence Prevention Initiative, a four-year-old program that fosters greater cooperation between police officers and state parole and probation agents. Police have used the program to jail people for probation violations who are suspects in criminal investigations, to seize weapons and to develop information used to make arrests.
NEWS
February 20, 2013
Regarding your editorial on President Obama's State of the Union plea for Congress to act on gun control, Marylander's deserve much more than a vote, they deserve true representation ("We deserve a vote," Feb. 17). The editorial highlighted the president's call for the voices of the victims of gun violence be heard, and it denounced the NRA, Republicans and certain Democrats for opposing legislation that would ban military-style assault rifles and large-capacity ammunition magazines.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | December 14, 1993
House Minority Leader Ellen R. Sauerbrey said yesterday that parole should be eliminated for all violent offenders in Maryland, a change she said would require the state's prison system to add another 4,000 beds by the end of the decade.Mrs. Sauerbrey, a conservative, four-term delegate from Baltimore County and a Republican candidate for governor, said that eliminating parole for those convicted of violent crimes is a move the state should make to crack down on the "small group of violent predators" who move in and out of the criminal justice system.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
Confronted with a bloody start to 2014, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will keep police curfew centers open longer, offer larger rewards for gun crime tips and implement a full-scale "Operation Ceasefire" program in Baltimore - a strategy that's been successful in other cities. The mayor plans to focus the majority of Monday afternoon's State of the City speech on what her administration is doing to address the violence. Homicides are up by 80 percent in 2014 compared with last year, though total violent crime is down by 29 percent.
NEWS
December 31, 2013
The fact that homicides in Baltimore City reached a four-year high last year - 234 as of Tuesday afternoon - can hardly come as a surprise to anyone who has witnessed the steady increase in murders since 2011. What did come as surprise to many was city Police Commissioner Anthony Batts' response Monday night to a television interviewer's question about what police can do about it. Mr. Batts told WBAL-TV's Jayne Miller that "everyday citizens" had no reason to worry about the carnage on the city's streets because "80 to 85 percent" of victims of the violence were African-American men involved in the drug trade - as if that somehow made the bloodshed more acceptable because it didn't affect white people.
NEWS
December 2, 2013
I felt a glimmer of hope when I read that Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts plans to equip some officers with cameras ( "Batts' crime-fighting plan focuses on gangs, guns, violent offenders," Nov. 21). I am a retired scientific photographer, and I have witnessed the value of recording data with a motion picture device. I hope Commissioner Batts succeeds in this effort. This tool could provide more convincing evidence than any eyewitness report. A picture may be worth a thousand words, but a movie is priceless.
NEWS
By Justin George, Justin Fenton and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts wants to stop sending officers out on low-priority 911 calls, expand foot patrols and create a unit focused on investigating incidents in which police use force. He proposes assigning homicide detectives to city neighborhoods, beefing up investigative units and sending elite plainclothes officers to more police districts. He wants to install tiny cameras on officers' uniforms and put computer tablets in their hands. A year on the job, Batts on Thursday unveiled an overarching crime-fighting plan he said would bring "much-needed" and "long-sought-after reform" in a department he said has relied too heavily on outdated procedures and technology.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
As Gov. Martin O'Malley and Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake have battled in recent weeks over crime-fighting strategies, both have come up with diagrams to illustrate their positions. O'Malley makes his argument with dueling trend lines that show crime declines leveled off as arrests dropped since his time at City Hall. Rawlings-Blake submits that arrests alone aren't the key to stopping violence, citing a chart that shows shootings and homicides at lower levels now than during O'Malley's tenure.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
Why is it that nobody sees anything when someone, man, woman or child, is gunned down on Baltimore's streets? In a city where it is the norm for people to sit on their porches late into the night to escape the heat, the only violence people see are the ones where police are involved ("Witnesses of man's death sought at vigil," July 24). These are the same people who complain about the safety of their streets but thwart any effort to enforce the laws and make lawbreakers into victims.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | December 11, 2008
Amid a surge in homicides, Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III said yesterday that police are turning up the pressure on violent offenders who have open warrants for minor violations. Bealefeld said 50 officers, pulled from patrol and specialized units, have been assigned to serve 500 to 600 priority warrants during early-morning hours, which he hopes will help take troublemakers off the streets and reinforce a message that police are watching. Twenty people were arrested yesterday morning as part of the effort, he said.
NEWS
April 8, 2008
Frederick H. Bealefeld III has been doing police work for too many years to be giddy about the reported drop in murders in Baltimore. As the city's police commissioner, he can take a certain amount of credit for the apparent milestone: 50 murders in the first three months of this year, marking the lowest quarter in 23 years. But his guarded optimism about what the statistic means for Baltimore is a wise sentiment. Since Mr. Bealefeld was tapped to lead the department in August, homicides have been declining.
NEWS
July 22, 2013
Public Enemy No. 1, Darryl M. Anderson, was caught in Birmingham, Ala., packing two guns after a year-long search during which he was also accused of committing more violent crimes while on the run ("'Public enemy No. 1' caught," July 17). His criminal record is worth recounting. At 15 he was charged with attempted first-degree murder. The case was dismissed. At 16 he broke into a car and with handgun. For that he was sentenced to three years with all but five days suspended.
NEWS
April 2, 2013
The recent editorial in The Sun ("Stopping the killing," March 24) argues the police should be focusing on guns and violent offenders. Clearly, there is value in having the police take as many guns off the street as possible, and strategies that engage hard-core violent offenders make a difference. That is why Commissioner Anthony Batts and his command staff have made guns, gangs and violent offenders the key elements of a strategy with five areas of focus aimed at reducing the unacceptable level of homicides in the city.
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