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By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
Although homicides in Howard County rose from two to four last year, the relatively low violent-crime levels declined, according to police statistics that mainly covered the first 11 months of the year. Rapes were down from 43 to 34 for the entire year, a 20 percent decline, according to police spokeswoman Sherry Llewellyn. She added that although the number of homicides rose, all four cases last year involved domestic violence. Howard typically has a half-dozen or fewer homicides in a year.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
The sharp reduction in violent crime that occurred on Martin O'Malley's watch as mayor of Baltimore is a central theme of the speech he gives as he travels the country and lays the groundwork for a presidential campaign. But ongoing criticism from the city's current mayor could focus attention on an aspect of O'Malley's crime-fighting record he never mentions in New Hampshire or Iowa: A soaring arrest rate during his tenure in Baltimore that angered civil rights groups and locked the city into a yearslong legal dispute.
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NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 11, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The rates of homicide and firearm violence jumped upward in 2005, ending a decade of decline, according to a new U.S. Justice Department report that reinforces recent warnings by law enforcement officials. The National Crime Victimization Survey, released yesterday, found that nationwide, killings increased 4.8 percent, from 16,140 in 2004 to 16,910 last year. The biggest increases were reported in the Midwest and the South. Experts said these increases buttress reports from the FBI and many mayors and police chiefs that violent crime is beginning to rise after a long decline.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Almost exactly two years ago this week Anthony Batts arrived in Baltimore to take over the leadership of the city's police department. Since then Baltimore has seen homicides go up, then come down again as Mr. Batts has instituted reforms, shaken up the force and reached out to local residents in an effort to build trust between his officers and the citizens they serve. It wasn't always obvious that the department was making progress on his watch, but it's a measure of his success in all those endeavors that today he enjoys the confidence of public officials who just a year ago were openly questioning whether he was up to the job. That remarkable turnaround in attitudes was reflected in the ringing endorsements Mr. Batts received this week from City Council members who appear set to unanimously approve his nomination for a new six-year contract as the city's top cop. Over the past two years Mr. Batts clearly has proven himself as a leader who can get things done, and he has vindicated the high hopes Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake held out for him when she recruited him from the West Coast where he had spent most of his 30-year career in law enforcement.
NEWS
By David Simon and Michael James and David Simon and Michael James,Staff Writers | August 7, 1992
Rushing to implement a new, violent-crime task force even before planning for the unit is complete, Baltimore police officials last night sent a dozen extra patrol officers into the most crime-ridden areas of East and West Baltimore in an effort to reassure beleagured residents."
NEWS
March 18, 2012
Tricia Bishop misrepresented my research as well as the debate over concealed-carry laws ("Gun laws' sketchy effect," March 11). She makes it appear that I am only "one economist" who claims to find that right-to-carry laws reduce violent crime. By now, a vast body of research supports my results. Among peer-reviewed national studies by criminologists and economists, 18 find that right-to-carry laws reduce violent crime, 10 claim no effect, and just one claims one type of crime temporarily increases slightly.
NEWS
April 2, 2013
The recent editorial in The Sun ("Stopping the killing," March 24) argues the police should be focusing on guns and violent offenders. Clearly, there is value in having the police take as many guns off the street as possible, and strategies that engage hard-core violent offenders make a difference. That is why Commissioner Anthony Batts and his command staff have made guns, gangs and violent offenders the key elements of a strategy with five areas of focus aimed at reducing the unacceptable level of homicides in the city.
NEWS
March 30, 2013
Several recent articles in The Sun have focused on Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed assault weapons ban ("O'Malley battling for gun controls," March 22). These articles all seem to have a common theme, the push for Marylanders to get on board the governor's agenda. It seems this push for support comes after many thousands of Marylanders who support their Second Amendment rights and disagree with Mr. O'Malley's approach to the state's violent crime issue have stood up and made their voices heard.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
The recent comments by Vincent DeMarco ( "Tougher gun laws are helping reduce homicides in Baltimore," July 5) are flawed in many respects. First he only points to New York City for statistics that support his views, but when other large cities like Chicago with strict gun laws are used, the reverse is true. Second Mr. DeMarco and The Baltimore Sun never report the statistics of how many people arrested for violent crimes have legal weapons. Third, the Maryland law has not made it more difficult for criminals to purchase firearms; rather, it has created a revenue source for the state and made it more difficult for law abiding citizens to purchase firearms.
NEWS
June 22, 2012
The city health officials who plan to strip non-conforming liquor stores of their licenses because of a Johns Hopkins University study linking them to violent crime may be confusing correlation with causation ("City targets liquor stores", June 18). The distinction is important, because if the liquor stores aren't what's causing the crime, then closing them won't cause it to drop and could even exacerbate the problem. Vacant properties, for example, also correlate with violent crime.
NEWS
By Thomas Neas, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Vacant buildings are many things: signs of decay, eyesores and dangerous. They might also hold a strong relationship to crime. According to frequently updated data provided by Open Baltimore, there is a strong correlation between vacant buildings and certain crimes, such as shootings and homicides. Common assault, a physical attack, increases from neighborhood to neighborhood as the number of vacant houses increases — a trend shared with crime in general. And it does so at a much more pronounced rate than other crimes.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
The recent comments by Vincent DeMarco ( "Tougher gun laws are helping reduce homicides in Baltimore," July 5) are flawed in many respects. First he only points to New York City for statistics that support his views, but when other large cities like Chicago with strict gun laws are used, the reverse is true. Second Mr. DeMarco and The Baltimore Sun never report the statistics of how many people arrested for violent crimes have legal weapons. Third, the Maryland law has not made it more difficult for criminals to purchase firearms; rather, it has created a revenue source for the state and made it more difficult for law abiding citizens to purchase firearms.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley on Tuesday kicked off the second year of an expanding initiative aimed at getting faith leaders - specifically men - involved in combating domestic violence, especially during a coordinated weekend in October. O'Malley addressed an audience of some 90 religious leaders at the Banneker-Douglass Museum in Annapolis on Tuesday and discussed his administration's effort to reduce violent crime against women and children. The administration has set a goal of reducing such crime by 25 percent by 2018 - to build on the 23 percent drop between 2006 and last year.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
By any measure, statistics show crime has been dropping in Baltimore. Yet many residents, like Vincent McCoy, say they don't feel it. "I wouldn't put money on it," cracked McCoy as he stood outside of the Belair Road church where he is a deacon. "I've seen the city when it was good, I've seen it when it was bad, and I don't see when it's getting any better. " Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake joined police officials Tuesday to tout the city's success against crime during the first six months of 2014.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
One year after one of Baltimore's most violent summers, this July opened with one of the lowest midyear homicide counts in three decades. Killings declined in the first half of 2014 to 97 people, compared with 115 during the first half of last year, when police worked to quell violence as 40 people were shot in a span of two weeks, including 20 over a single weekend. This year's pace puts it on track with a multiyear decline that ended in 2012. While Baltimore remains one of the most violent major U.S. cities - a toddler was killed early Tuesday - police officials have credited several initiatives with helping to reduce homicides, including more patrols in violent areas.
NEWS
May 27, 2014
Perhaps someday in the future, forensic psychiatrists and others will analyze the circumstances of last Friday's mass shooting near Santa Barbara, Calif. from medical records, family interviews and YouTube videos and determine definitively what was going inside the mind of suspected gunman Elliot Rodger. That he hated women was obviously a significant piece of the puzzle. Was it that anger that caused him to plan the rampage, post his manifesto on the Internet and ultimately kill six people and injure 13 before killing himself, or was that simply the delusion on which a suicidal 22-year-old became obsessed?
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
Confronted with a bloody start to 2014, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will keep police curfew centers open longer, offer larger rewards for gun crime tips and implement a full-scale "Operation Ceasefire" program in Baltimore - a strategy that's been successful in other cities. The mayor plans to focus the majority of Monday afternoon's State of the City speech on what her administration is doing to address the violence. Homicides are up by 80 percent in 2014 compared with last year, though total violent crime is down by 29 percent.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
Towson University student Mykeal Spivey was walking toward his off-campus apartment when three men came up from behind, demanded his cellphone and attacked him when he refused. Spivey noticed the blood as he collapsed against a light pole; he hadn't realized they had stabbed him. "I like to tell myself it was just odds. These things happen every now and then, unfortunately," said Spivey, 25. "Initially, everyone assumed that it happened downtown, not in Towson. " The attack was one of several violent incidents that have shaken the Baltimore County seat in recent months, and police and community groups have stepped up public safety campaigns in response.
NEWS
April 3, 2014
Replacing the current pre-trial release system is going to be a bear ( "Getting out of jail free," March 26). Today, District Court commissioners set most bails. But since the Maryland Court of Appeals ruled that defendants are entitled to be represented by counsel at those hearings, state legislators have been trying to get around the requirement by proposing that pre-trial release investigators use a computerized assessment tool to determine if a person is eligible for release.
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