Advertisement
HomeCollectionsViolence On Television
IN THE NEWS

Violence On Television

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | November 13, 1992
Vicki Riley is hoping that Friday the 13th is frightening for network television executives in more ways than one.Ms. Riley, 31, is the main force behind the second annual "Turn Off the TV Day," a grass-roots nationwide effort that she hopes will show executives that viewers are fed up with what she describes as excessive sex and violence on television. She is chairwoman of the effort by a coalition of media watchdog groups to persuade people to express their disgust by doing anything other than turning on the television today.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 2, 2006
George Gerbner, 86, a researcher who for decades studied violence on television and how it shapes perceptions of society, died Dec. 24 in Philadelphia. Dr. Gerbner, who was dean emeritus of the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg School for Communications, studied television for more than three decades. He founded the Cultural Indicators Research Project in 1968 to track changes in television content and how those changes affect viewers' perceptions of the world. Its database has information on more than 3,000 television programs and 35,000 characters.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 8, 1993
Movie official says that violence is outThe entertainment industry "is ready to assume its responsibility" and has already taken steps to reduce violence on television and in films, Motion Picture Association of America President Jack Valenti said yesterday."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | December 3, 1999
CONCORD, N.H. -- The subject was school violence at Concord High School here the other day as Vice President Al Gore addressed a jam-packed crowd in the school auditorium. This was the Al Gore who had just gone through a somewhat embarrassing public examination of his now-famous sartorial remake -- open-necked shirts, earth-tone suits and all that -- and he was back being the old uncool Mr. Gore.He stood without the jacket of his dark blue suit, in dress shirt and tie, and engaged in a lively dialogue with the students for nearly an hour over their feelings about violence in movies and the incident at Columbine High in Colorado.
NEWS
January 2, 2006
George Gerbner, 86, a researcher who for decades studied violence on television and how it shapes perceptions of society, died Dec. 24 in Philadelphia. Dr. Gerbner, who was dean emeritus of the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg School for Communications, studied television for more than three decades. He founded the Cultural Indicators Research Project in 1968 to track changes in television content and how those changes affect viewers' perceptions of the world. Its database has information on more than 3,000 television programs and 35,000 characters.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 5, 1998
The Johns Hopkins University School of Continuing Studies is sponsoring a five-part discussion series starting this week on free speech, the media and privacy:* Wednesday, defense attorney Barry Scheck and Associated Press court reporter Linda Deutsch will talk about free speech and trials.* Oct. 14 -- Frank Sesno, Washington Bureau Chief for CNN, will deal with the balance between common decency and the public's right to get information.* Oct. 21 -- Hal Buell, chief international photo editor for the AP, photographer Felice Quinto and Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig will discuss the paparazzi and privacy.
NEWS
By RAYMOND K.K. HO | September 12, 1993
The greatest mass addiction in America today is not alcohol orcocaine, it is television.The tube is America's electronic Trojan horse. It seemed so benign at first, but in less than 50 years, it has captured virtually all our leisure time, and hypnotized families, communities and the nation every day.TV is the master teacher of our children and the biggest classroom without walls. It is the electronic pulpit of values and the cultural religion of our time. Americans learn more from television than anything else, but what are we teaching and what are we learning?
NEWS
December 28, 1994
Ever since Yale University professor Leonard D. Eron's pioneering studies of aggression among children in the 1960s, researchers have pondered the relationship between societal violence and the depiction of violence on television. That there is some relationship hardly anyone doubts. But whether TV violence actually causes children to behave violently or whether it merely reflects an increasingly violent world remains a topic of lively debate.Dr. Eron's initial studies seemed to suggest that children who watched television not only were more aggressive as teen-agers but also were more likely to commit crimes as adults.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | November 1, 1993
Could Janet Reno be to television violence what C. Everett Koop was to smoking?The attorney general's tough warning to the entertainment industry -- clean up your act or face federal controls -- came like an elixir. This is the act of courageous leadership from the top of American government that we've waited for years to hear.Predictably, bleatings of First Amendment infringement are emanating from the entertainment industry as it contemplates Ms. Reno's threat.Yet she isn't asking much.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | February 25, 1996
THE BROADCAST industry, after years of resisting any attempt to regulate the content of television programs, is finally coming around to the idea of establishing its own ratings system. The question is, will the proposal, even if enacted, have any discernable effect on the effect on the problem of excessive violence on television and the harm it does both children and adults?There's not much dispute that TV violence is a problem. A recent year-long study sponsored by the cable industry found that most programs on television contain violence that is "psychologically harmful."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 5, 1998
The Johns Hopkins University School of Continuing Studies is sponsoring a five-part discussion series starting this week on free speech, the media and privacy:* Wednesday, defense attorney Barry Scheck and Associated Press court reporter Linda Deutsch will talk about free speech and trials.* Oct. 14 -- Frank Sesno, Washington Bureau Chief for CNN, will deal with the balance between common decency and the public's right to get information.* Oct. 21 -- Hal Buell, chief international photo editor for the AP, photographer Felice Quinto and Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig will discuss the paparazzi and privacy.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1997
Paul Klite came to Baltimore not to praise television news, but to skewer it as responsible for a host of society's ills and to recommend that pretty much the whole thing be scuttled and rebuilt to reflect a more wholesome and more studious society.Klite, a media watchdog based in Denver, spoke to a crowd of about 35 at UMBC Wednesday night. His organization, Rocky Mountain Media Watch, contends that local TV news spends too much time on violence (or "mayhem," as he terms it, which encompasses murder, war and disasters)
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | February 25, 1996
THE BROADCAST industry, after years of resisting any attempt to regulate the content of television programs, is finally coming around to the idea of establishing its own ratings system. The question is, will the proposal, even if enacted, have any discernable effect on the effect on the problem of excessive violence on television and the harm it does both children and adults?There's not much dispute that TV violence is a problem. A recent year-long study sponsored by the cable industry found that most programs on television contain violence that is "psychologically harmful."
NEWS
December 28, 1994
Ever since Yale University professor Leonard D. Eron's pioneering studies of aggression among children in the 1960s, researchers have pondered the relationship between societal violence and the depiction of violence on television. That there is some relationship hardly anyone doubts. But whether TV violence actually causes children to behave violently or whether it merely reflects an increasingly violent world remains a topic of lively debate.Dr. Eron's initial studies seemed to suggest that children who watched television not only were more aggressive as teen-agers but also were more likely to commit crimes as adults.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 9, 1994
Legislation calling for the creation of a commission on television, and a statewide system to warn viewers of violent TV programs, was introduced yesterday in the Maryland General Assembly."
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 2, 1994
Television reformers responded with skepticism yesterday to the cable and broadcast industries' plans for curbing violence on TV, calling their promises nothing more than empty rhetoric.Industry executives said during news conferences in Washington yesterday that they would have their programming independently monitored as a means of reducing violence on the screen.Cable systems went a step further, saying they would use technology that would allow parents to keep their children from viewing violent programs.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | December 3, 1999
CONCORD, N.H. -- The subject was school violence at Concord High School here the other day as Vice President Al Gore addressed a jam-packed crowd in the school auditorium. This was the Al Gore who had just gone through a somewhat embarrassing public examination of his now-famous sartorial remake -- open-necked shirts, earth-tone suits and all that -- and he was back being the old uncool Mr. Gore.He stood without the jacket of his dark blue suit, in dress shirt and tie, and engaged in a lively dialogue with the students for nearly an hour over their feelings about violence in movies and the incident at Columbine High in Colorado.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Staunch opponents of TV violence are criticizing a parental advisory plan offered by the major television networks while television executives are defending it against accusations that it does not resolve the problem.Lawmakers and activists who have pushed hard in recent months for a dramatic reduction in the level of TV violence, which they contend is directly related to violence in society, said the network labeling plan is not enough."It's like having a chemical company paint their smokestack red to say here's where the pollution is being emitted," said Sen. Byron L. Dorgan, D-N.D.
NEWS
November 8, 1993
Movie official says that violence is outThe entertainment industry "is ready to assume its responsibility" and has already taken steps to reduce violence on television and in films, Motion Picture Association of America President Jack Valenti said yesterday."
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | November 2, 1993
New York.-- "Just turn the thing off.''As a solution to the current controversy over sex and violence on television and their effects on children, that would seem to be common sense. I wish it were, but I don't think it is. You cannot control television with a clicker or an on-off button, because television is not an appliance, or even a ''medium'' as we now use that word. It is an environment. Television is more like weather than it is like this newspaper.The argument is that parents really have to take responsibility for what their children see, or are exposed to.Many kids, though, do not, in effect, have parents in these trying times.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.