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By Tony Sclafani | November 16, 2011
When the third Sunday of the month rolls around, Columbia resident Alan Lee knows just where he'll be going. It's to the Arbutus Fire Hall, an unassuming brick building just off the southwestern Baltimore County town's main drag of East Drive. But Lee isn't a volunteer firefighter. He's a pop music aficionado, specifically an authority on the doo-wop vocal group records of the 1950s and early 1960s. And his monthly venture to the fire hall is spent in that venue's basement, perusing old vinyl 45s and LPs of the music he loves.
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By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Names are not what they seem for the Baltimore rock quintet Vinny Vegas. Start with the band's name: It is not the alter ego of lead singer Scott Siskind, but rather an obscure reference to a professional wrestler from the early '90s. Then there's the title of the group's debut album, November's “The Big White Whale,” whose vinyl release will be celebrated at a Vinny Vegas-headlining show at Metro Gallery on Saturday. Despite cover art that depicts a diver next to a massive whale, Siskind said the title has nothing to do with Herman Melville's novel.
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FEATURES
By Holly Selby | August 18, 1991
The wet look is alive and well: Vinyl jackets and short skirts are showing up in the most fashionable spots. Designers such as Begedor and Bosco have decided that the slick look of vinyl is just that: slick enough to wear as a fashion statement on evening outings or just for fun.Vinyl, which began as a rainy-day look, can still be found in swing coats and rain jackets, but watch for it in trench coats, in jackets worn with short skirts, or in shiny mini...
NEWS
December 4, 2012
If the unfortunate Hon-trademarking flap of 2010 wasn't enough to get Baltimore's beehive in a bunch, surely the news that city bureaucrats, without much thought about the matter, have proposed banning Formstone in new construction will do the trick. Is Formstone a great aesthetic innovation? No. Was its proliferation several decades ago a failure of good taste? Maybe so. But if it was a failure, it was Baltimore's own. It was an affordable ornamentation, an expression of a blue collar optimism that things were on their way up and that our houses, even the modest attached variety, should reflect that faith in upward mobility.
FEATURES
By N.Y. Times News Service | April 3, 1991
It's hard to miss the thing that makes this season's trench coats, jeans, shirts, T-shirts and even the occasional dress look new. It's vinyl, and you can spot the shine a mile away.Designers and manufacturers have taken up vinyl with a vengeance. The newest versions of vinyl gleam with a glow more potent than patent leather's, while stretch fibers make them just about as malleable as any other clothing material.Those who are daring and have gorgeous bodies can try stretch-vinyl leggings or jeans.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | March 20, 2008
If you have reached a certain level of "maturity," you probably have boxes in the basement filled with artifacts known as vinyl records. We played these dinosaurs of the analog age on gadgets called turntables, and if we played them enough times - or spilled enough beer on them - they developed that combination of crackles, pops and distortion that teary-eyed audio tweaks like to call the "warmth of vinyl." Many adults persist in keeping these long after the only turntable that could play them has crumbled into dust.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1998
Sykesville may not have Victorian grandeur, but the turn-of-the-century charm of a working-class town is slowly re-emerging on its bustling Main Street.The town is restoring its storefronts and homes, hoping that its history, riverfront and railroad ties can make it an antiques mecca for Carroll County and beyond.But preservation is battling practicality in this town of 3,500. The issue: vinyl siding.In a feud that has spilled into public hearings and the courts, residents are scrapping over the Historic District Commission's insistence on preserving Sykesville's character by maintaining the original wood siding of buildings.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2000
Sykesville faces a $3 million lawsuit, brought by the daughter of a town councilman, over issues surrounding the town's Historic District Commission. In a suit filed in Carroll Circuit Court, Joy and Brad Baker say they were harassed when they tried to remodel their Main Street house for rental units. The couple has asked for damages that would be double the town's operating budget. Baker is the daughter of Councilman Charlie Mullins. The suit comes in the midst of the town's efforts to revive its downtown and restore its 19th-century clapboard storefronts.
FEATURES
By Rodney Ho and Rodney Ho,COX NEWS SERVICE | March 10, 2003
The 45 rpm vinyl single is a fragile black platter, 7 inches in diameter, with a doughnut-hole center and concentric ridges. To baby boomers, it brings back memories of living-room bashes and junior high make-out sessions. To anyone under age 20, it's as foreign as a rotary phone. But its current irrelevancy hasn't deterred Bill Windsor, a 54-year-old Dunwoody, Ga., entrepreneur, from compiling one of the largest collections of 45s around. At his Web site, www.45s.com, collectors can buy almost every vinyl single that charted on the Billboard 100 from the 1950s to the '90s, most for a modest $5. "Except for Sinatra, the Beatles and Elvis, most of my 45s aren't worth that much," Windsor says.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 17, 2002
Scratch will make even the uninitiated believe in the joy and propulsive power of hip-hop. The history of the music is given plenty of due, beginning with Grand Wizard Theodore's recollection of how he invented the hip-hop DJ back in the early 1970s when, after his mom complained about the loud music, he stopped the record with his hand and liked the sound that came out - that distinctive scratching sound that hip-hop DJs have been playing endless variations...
EXPLORE
By Tony Sclafani | November 16, 2011
When the third Sunday of the month rolls around, Columbia resident Alan Lee knows just where he'll be going. It's to the Arbutus Fire Hall, an unassuming brick building just off the southwestern Baltimore County town's main drag of East Drive. But Lee isn't a volunteer firefighter. He's a pop music aficionado, specifically an authority on the doo-wop vocal group records of the 1950s and early 1960s. And his monthly venture to the fire hall is spent in that venue's basement, perusing old vinyl 45s and LPs of the music he loves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
At least 3,700 record stores have closed around the country since 2003, according to market research firm Almighty Music Marketing. Illegal file-sharing, MySpace, band camp, social media outlets, and the overall digitalization of the music industry have displaced the traditional record store as the place where Americans get their music. To remind people of the stores' continued relevance and importance, a few music fans conceived Record Store Day about five years ago. It will be celebrated again Saturday at some 700 independent record stores around the country, including 20 stores in Maryland, according to the "holiday's" official website.
NEWS
April 9, 2010
CDs were the new vinyl. Then, mp3s were the new CDs. These days, vinyl is the new mp3. At many dance nights around Baltimore, DJs are increasingly spinning vinyl 45s instead of CDs or mp3s. Patrick "DJ Action Pat" Griffin, who regularly plays Save Your Soul at Lithuanian Hall, has been collecting vinyl for the past 10 years. His collection, which numbers about 4,000, is heavy on soul, R&B and rock ‘n' roll from the ‘50s. Over time, Griffin has developed strategies for where to find the most obscure records, and how much to pay. Here are his tips for aspiring vinyl collectors.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2009
THURSDAY HIGH ZERO FESTIVAL: These classically trained and self-taught musicians think way outside the box. Their avant-garde improvisations can be heard around Baltimore through Sunday. Though it might sound like noise to some listeners, these performers are visionaries whose exploration of the fringe will one day influence the mainstream. Thursday performances start at 8:30 p.m. sharp. Tickets are $10-$12. Go to highzero.org. 'THE MERCY SEAT': Neil LaBute's play takes place the day after 9/11 and concerns two World Trade Center workers who survive the attacks and consider using the event as a means of escape to start a new life together.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,dan.rodricks@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
The first customer tapped on the glass door of his vinyl record store an hour before Gary Gebler opened for business. "Do you have any Michael Jackson?" the customer asked, and Mr. Gebler showed him to the wooden bin containing the stack of original Thriller albums. It was, of course, the day after Mr. Jackson's death, and it didn't take long for Mr. Gebler's Trax on Wax in Catonsville to sell out of anything bearing the King of Pop's name. Bad disappeared, and so did the last of Mr. Gebler's "We Are The World" stock.
BUSINESS
By Nzong Xiong and Nzong Xiong,McClatchy-Tribune | April 6, 2008
The image of a home surrounded by a white picket fence has always stayed with Lynne Gibbs of Clovis, Calif. "To me, it represented the all-American dream," says Gibbs, 63, a retired paralegal. "It was why I wanted one. When I was growing up, the white picket fence meant harmony with your house, your family, your spouse. Everybody wanted the house with a picket fence." The dream became a reality for Gibbs when she bought the last lot at the end of the street in a new subdivision. Before she and her husband moved in 2005, she went to Lowe's and bought some vinyl white picket fencing.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2000
Sykesville faces a $3 million lawsuit, brought by the daughter of a town councilman, over issues surrounding the town's Historic District Commission. In a suit filed in Carroll Circuit Court, Joy and Brad Baker say they were harassed when they tried to remodel their Main Street house for rental units. The couple has asked for damages that would be double the town's operating budget. Baker is the daughter of Councilman Charlie Mullins. He could not be reached for comment. Volunteer panel The suit comes in the midst of the town's efforts to revive its downtown and restore its 19th-century clapboard storefronts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | April 20, 2006
Last November, DJ Lovegrove finally caved. Mosaic, the outdoor lounge he manages in Power Plant Live, closed for the season, and Lovegrove took up a residency every other Friday at Sky Lounge Tango Tapas. Before then, Lovegrove, aka LG Concannon, spun some CDs but mostly stuck with vinyl - even as his fellow DJs slowly went digital. But Sky Lounge's DJ booth was too cramped for Lovegrove to comfortably set up two turntables and two CD players simultaneously, so he had to choose one or the other.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | March 20, 2008
If you have reached a certain level of "maturity," you probably have boxes in the basement filled with artifacts known as vinyl records. We played these dinosaurs of the analog age on gadgets called turntables, and if we played them enough times - or spilled enough beer on them - they developed that combination of crackles, pops and distortion that teary-eyed audio tweaks like to call the "warmth of vinyl." Many adults persist in keeping these long after the only turntable that could play them has crumbled into dust.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | August 23, 2007
Having spent last week on vacation sans Internet, I had to wait until today to extend a slightly belated happy 25th birthday to a gadget that forever changed the way we entertain ourselves. On Aug. 17, 1982, the first compact disk (or disc) rolled off a German production line, paving the way for a generation of devices that can now cram a thousand hours of hours of music or more into a box the size of deck of cards. The technology that made the CD possible has also changed the dynamic of the music business - including the role of artists, the companies who market their music, and those of us who listen to it. Ironically, that same technology now threatens to make the CD irrelevant.
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