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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | June 22, 1997
Americans are notorious cherry-pickers when it comes to red Bordeaux.In top vintages, we are more than willing to open our wallets to stock our cellars with classic claret. But let there be even so much as a suggestion that the vintage is below par and we bail out of the market in about as much time as it takes to pop a cork.For the most part, this reflects savvy judgment. Yes, we might miss some bargains, such as the underrated and precocious 1993s, but it makes a lot of sense to leave such vintages as 1991 and 1992 to the Japanese and to French supermarket chains.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
OK, so the first thing you need to know about this Midweek Madness installment is that it isn't quite mad. But let's face it, when you think of Patricia Routledge, who turned 85 this week, you think of Hyacinth Bucket (it's pronounced "bouquet"), the fussy, snobby character she portrayed to hilarious effect on the 1990s Britcom "Keeping Up Appearances. " (Given how often it still airs on PBS stations over here, perhaps it could also be called "Keeping Up Ratings. ") One of the many brilliant things about Miss Routledge is her ability to imitate hideous singing as Hyacinth.  It takes a true singer to do that perfectly, and she is a true singer.
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FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | November 1, 1995
Saintsbury's Garnet bottling of California pinot noir has been a delicious light red wine for many vintages now, but the 1994 vintage takes it a step beyond. An extra measure of concentration gives it extra length and makes it the best Garnet to date. With its generous fruit and racy acidity, it makes for an excellent restaurant wine. It's a perfect wine for bridging the gap when one diner is having fish and the other a red meat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2014
While you're mulling over all those usual New Year's resolutions you will not keep, here's a reminder of the right attitude to take as 2014 dawns -- an attitude, I hasten to admit, I have the hardest time maintaining. The great Chet Baker delivers the sage guidance with disarming directness via this Jerome Kern .
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By Frank J. Prial and Frank J. Prial,New York Times News Service | December 15, 1991
With the publication of the second edition of his "Bordeaux" (Simon & Schuster, $35), Maryland-based Robert M. Parker Jr. has further solidified his position as America's pre-eminent wine critic.Much of the book is updated material that appeared in the first edition, published in 1985, and in Mr. Parker's newsletter, the Wine Advocate. Even so, the result is a big achievement.As the sports writers would say, the stats are impressive. There are some 2,700 tastings notes on the wines of 677 Bordeaux chateaux.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1996
There were a lot of geniuses in the Italian wine importing business back in the early 1990s. Where do you suppose they've all gone?It's easy to be Einstein when you have vintages such as the 1988-1990 Piedmont wines and the 1988 and 1990 Tuscan wines to sell. But when you run into a stretch of four unexciting vintages such as 1991-1994, a lot of folks in the wine business dumb down in a hurry.It's vintages such as these, especially bona fide stinkers such as 1992, that truly separate the savants from the schlemiels.
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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | November 9, 1994
Somehow it still seems funny to look at Italian wines and see high prices.There's a bit of a disconnection there. After all, what is Italy if not the world's source of hearty, inexpensive wines?Sigh. Those were the days.Just for fun, cruise by the Italian wine section of a good wine store. Take a look at the shelves where the wines of the Piedmont region are displayed. Notice the prices on the region's flagship wines, Barolo and Barbaresco. If you find any under $20, send me a telegram. It's almost enough to drive you back to the era of red-checkered tablecloths and ice-cold mediocre Chianti.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | March 2, 2008
By design, the rooms are chilly, damp and dark -- but an environment in demand. Homeowners are turning to wine cellars to keep their vintages in optimal storage conditions, building rooms that can be as elegant as a Tuscany-styled entertainment hideaway or as stark as a rack-lined cave. Cellars can cost as little as a few thousand dollars for a simple grotto or well into the six figures for an architectural statement, and they are as likely to hold inexpensive vintages as they are those valued at upwards of $2,000 a bottle.
NEWS
By Michael Hill | December 30, 1991
BORDEAUX. By Robert M. Parker Jr. Simon & Schuster. 1,027 pages. $35. JUST in time for festivities of the solstice comes a new, thicker, more expensive, second edition of Robert Parker's "Bordeaux," an encyclopedia of tastes and smells of the wines from this most famous grape-growing region of France.This is really a stunning piece of wine journalism. In just over a decade of serious, professional tasting, Parkton resident Parker, who publishes the internationally influential "Wine Advocate," has sampled, evaluated and cataloged virtually every wine made in this area over the past two decades.
NEWS
June 25, 1991
America's preoccupation with fitness has produced some jarring contradictions -- light cheesecake and light beef, diet ice cream and low-calorie Twinkies. So it probably could have been expected: Taylor California Cellars is now marketing a diet Chablis, which has 50 percent fewer calories than the real stuff, and 70 percent less alcohol.The new wine is supposed to appeal to men and women who don't usually drink alcohol but are a tad uncomfortable ordering a diet Coke with scampi. But it will, undoubtedly, be a smash hit among joggers and fiber-eaters as well.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron | December 6, 2013
There isn't much that goes on in Baltimore that doesn't include Tom Noonan. The president and CEO of Visit Baltimore is responsible for promoting the region and all of its venues as a destination for conventions, meetings, leisure travelers, day-trippers, and even family reunions. But being Charm City-centric doesn't mean that Noonan doesn't ever get out of town - quite the opposite. As a leader in the tourism industry, he also works with national organizations that teach travel marketing, a role that takes him to destinations far from Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Joel R. Bailey, a longtime Baltimore County public school English teacher who also coached basketball, died Friday of complications from a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 77. "The first thing, Joel really liked his students. ... He enjoyed interacting with them. He was a gentleman," said William L. McIntyre, who grew up with and attended elementary, middle and high schools with Mr. Bailey. "He was the same way in basketball. He was a good teaching coach. He communicated well with his students and he respected them, and they respected him," said Mr. McIntyre, a retired Eastern Technical High School social studies teacher.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Olan R. Shively, a retired mechanical engineer who collected vintage Plymouth automobiles, died Sept. 19 of liver cancer at Bonnie Blink, the Maryland Masonic Home in Hunt Valley. The former longtime Millersville resident was 88. The son of a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad telegrapher and a homemaker, Olan Roger Shively was born and raised in Minerva, Ohio, where he graduated in 1942 from Minerva High School. After graduating with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering in 1947 from Ohio State University, where he had been active in the ROTC, Mr. Shively served on active duty for four years with the Army Corps of Engineers.
NEWS
Special to The Aegis | June 19, 2013
The Historical Society of Harford County's annual benefit yard sale will take place this Saturday, June 22, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Historical Society's headquarters at 143 N. Main St. The event has expanded this year to include the sale of antique and vintage furnishings, lighting and other items. A large number of the items to be sold are the result of a generous donation of pieces given to the society by Judy Graybeal Eagle specifically for its fund-raising effort. The majority of the donation consists of pieces collected by her late parents, Eugene and Jean Graybeal.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Fifi is no shrinking violet. The 68-year-old warplane can't sky like it used to, and getting all the parts going in the morning takes a little more thought and planning. But Fifi - the last B-29 Superfortress still in the air - commands respect, with super-charged engines that growl with authority and menacing gun turrets that appear ready to fend off swarming enemy fighters. The plane did, after all, have more than a bit part in "The Right Stuff," standing in as the mother ship for test pilot Chuck Yeager's first supersonic flight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colleen Jaskot, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Stacey Chambers has always been on the move. As a child, her nickname was Go Go, because she rarely slowed down. So it comes as little surprise that Chambers, 31, would wind up running a fashion boutique out of a bus. Chambers runs Go Go's Retread Threads (the name borrowed from her childhood moniker) out of a bus from the early '90s she's named Elsa, parking at farmers' markets, at festivals and on neighborhood streets to sell vintage clothes. Chambers started the business in 2010 after she heard a National Public Radio story about how small businesses run out of traditional storefronts were struggling.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | February 8, 2004
Rob Degenhard and Nini Sarmiento love their jobs. And no wonder. The husband-and-wife team, who own the new store Home Anthology in Ellicott City, get to buy cool stuff for a living. The two scour estate sales and auctions and purchase interesting vintage furniture and accessories to sell in their store. After discovering their knack for thrift-shopping while furnishing their home, they opened Home Anthology last year in a 350-square-foot space in Cockeysville. In the fall, they moved their business to Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
Robert G. Jaharias, a retired Westinghouse Electric Corp. supervisor who enjoyed collecting and driving vintage automobiles, died Friday of heart failure at his Sykesville home. He was 83. Born in Frederick, Robert George Jaharias moved with his family in 1931 to Baltimore and several years later to Essex. While attending Kenwood High School, Mr. Jaharias began working at Westinghouse. After graduation in 1947, he joined the company full time, eventually being promoted to installation supervisor.
FEATURES
By Rachel Gatulis, For The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
Toward the end of the summer, I was up in Cape Cod and visited this adorable vintage bridal shop with my future mother-in-law and bridesmaid Lindsey. I found a great veil with three rows of satin edges that was both beautiful and inexpensive, so I bought it. It has been in my car, in a bag ever since. Two weekends ago, I went to Betsy Robinson to try on my dress for two out-of-town bridesmaids. I brought my trusty vintage veil only to discover that vintage equaled really, really yellow.
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