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By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | June 23, 1992
Vintage books, unlike some collectibles, continue to escalate in price during a recession. Many select titles double and triple in value. Christie's New York recently held a rare book auction that netted $1.2 million.At the same time, however, many budget-conscious average collectors have become fussier and lately have been buying fewer books. They realize long-term value depends on significance of the book or author, scarcity and condition, and general interest in the topic or time period.
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By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | June 23, 1992
Vintage books, unlike some collectibles, continue to escalate in price during a recession. Many select titles double and triple in value. Christie's New York recently held a rare book auction that netted $1.2 million.At the same time, however, many budget-conscious average collectors have become fussier and lately have been buying fewer books. They realize long-term value depends on significance of the book or author, scarcity and condition, and general interest in the topic or time period.
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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff | July 6, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The first time Bernard Lefkowitz saw the woman he would come to call "Leslie Faber," it was an anniversary, the kind that only journalists recognize. Was it year to the day since the retarded teen-ager had been assaulted, or a year to the day the so-called Glen Ridge rape case had come to light? That detail eludes him.But he remembers standing in front of Glen Ridge High School in the spring of 1990, talking to another student. Not one of the boys accused of assaulting Leslie, but someone outside that clique of popular jocks.
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December 9, 2007
Robert L. Bogomolny took on the role of president of the University of Baltimore on Aug. 1, 2002. A Harvard College and Harvard Law School graduate, Bogomolny came to UB from G.D. Searle & Co., where he served as corporate senior vice president and general counsel from 1987 to 2001. From 1977 to 1987, Bogomolny served as professor of law and dean of the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law at Cleveland State University. Bogomolny has moved aggressively to develop UB's curriculum and programs, developing a joint M.B.A.
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By A.M. Chaplin | May 12, 1991
"I THOUGHT I WAS GOING TO GET A LOT of hate mail, but quite the opposite," says Brown University senior Jeff Shesol, creator of "Politically Correct Person," one of the characters in the popular Brown Daily Herald comic strip "Thatch."The favorable response to the introduction of P.C. Person -- fitted out like a superhero in cape, trunks and iron-clad idealism -- suggests "that the P.C. are a real minority," Mr. Shesol believes. But despite their small numbers, he says, "they make a lot of noise and shut down the discussion, which goes against the idea of what the university is all about.
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By N.Y. Times News Service | October 1, 1990
After taking public television by storm with the recent series on PBS, the Civil War is now cutting a swath through the nation's bookstores.More than 75 stores nationwide already specialize in Civil War books, but now many general bookstores -- including the Doubleday Book Shop on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan -- are adding Civil War sections.One of the fastest-selling books in any category is the companion volume to the television series -- "The Civil War: An Illustrated History" by Geoffrey C. Ward with Ric Burns and Ken Burns, published by Alfred A. Knopf.
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By Carolyn McConnell and Carolyn McConnell,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 1997
"Leaning Towards Infinity: How My Mother's Apron Unfolds Into My Life," by Sue Woolfe. Vintage Books. 393 pages. $24.95.If you tilt the number eight on its side, its voluptuous curves suggest a woman's body. It also is the symbol for infinity. Australian novelist Sue Woolfe's first U.S.-published novel invites such startling thoughts. This is a novel about the sensuousness of mathematics.An Australian acquaintance of mine, asked about Woolfe's work, said, "Oh, she's one of those Australian feminist writers."
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By H. B. Johnson Jr | March 7, 1994
SIX AMERICAN POETS. Edited by Joel Conarroe. VintageBooks/Random House. 281 pages. $12.TC I FINALLY did it! I finally got through a book that otherwise would not have been a chore. I have AIDS, you see. The eyes burn, and I get too quickly tired. But enough about that. I want to talk about something more life-giving and life-sustaining. I want to talk about poetry.The wife of a dear friend of mine sent me a delicious meal last week, and his son sent me a collection of books. I consumed everything with gratitude.
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By Edward Wyatt and Edward Wyatt,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 13, 2005
Former President Bill Clinton's best-selling memoir, My Life, will be published this summer in two paperback formats, his publisher announced yesterday. One format will separate the original book into two volumes - one recounting the author's recollections of his early life and the other his presidency. Sales of the hardcover edition of the book surpassed 2 million copies last weekend, according to the publisher, Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Random House Inc., which is owned by Bertelsmann.
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By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Los Angeles Times Service | August 24, 1994
The first fact of life in Provence is the sun, wrote Waverly Root in his authoritative book, "The Food of France" (Vintage Books, $13 softcover). It not only lured such stellar painters as van Gogh and Matisse to its brilliant countryside, but it created a unique, heady cuisine as well.Provence is known for rose wines that writer Alexis Lichine described as having "a certain roughness combined with liveliness and gaiety and with a high enough alcoholic content that the drinker is apt soon to take on the same characteristics."
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By BOSTON GLOBE | November 13, 2005
It's Superman Tom De Haven Chronicle / 425 pages Tom De Haven's giddy joy ride of a novel, It's Superman!, returns the famous comic book tale to its roots in 1930s America, with Clark Kent as an awkward high school kid in rural Kansas. The story begins with Clark trying to explain to a local sheriff how a wanted criminal fired his gun point-blank at Clark but somehow ended up dead when the bullet ricocheted. For as long as Clark can remember, such unexplained things have happened to him. He emerges from serious accidents unscathed, can set fires with a focused stare, and can even drive nails into a fence post with his fist.
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