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NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA and LAURA VOZZELLA,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | May 10, 2009
A year ago, an acclaimed architect-artist swooped into Baltimore and tore out a front lawn, leaving a garden and a budding revolution in its place. Has either one borne fruit? Clarence Ridgley, a supervisor at a plastic bottle factory, surrendered his West Baltimore yard to Fritz Haeg's Edible Estates project, a deliciously subversive attempt to replace grass with plants people can use. After checking in with Ridgley recently, I'd say it's easier to coax peppers, grapes and turnips out of the ground than it is to persuade people to grow food out front.
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NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | April 6, 2009
We are lice-free at last with Listerine, alcohol, vinegar and Denorex! We sprayed four heads every night with Listerine before bed, then combed and combed every inch with a nit comb. The lice were gone in three days, but we continued this ritual for seven more days to kill off any newly hatched eggs each day. I soaked the four separate nit combs in rubbing alcohol between uses and dipped them periodically in the alcohol as I combed. We also used vinegar on one severely affected head to loosen the nits.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | February 18, 2009
TIP 37 Save on cleaning supplies by making your own The ingredients are probably all right there in your kitchen or bath cabinets - baking soda, ammonia, vinegar, rubbing alcohol. Know what to mix with what and you could make your own household cleaners and save money at the grocery or drugstore. Be careful and make sure you follow all the directions to be safe. Instead of paying extra for Pine Sol, Windex or Tilex, make your own floor, window and tile cleaners, suggests Web site www.creativehomemaking.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESSA GRAEDON | November 17, 2008
In India, we offer fennel seeds after meals. This helps avoid flatulence. Fennel is also good for sore throat and sinus problems. I use the following recipe for my sinus trouble: Combine 1 tablespoon fennel seeds, 1/4 teaspoon powdered ginger, 1 clove, 1/2 -inch piece of stick cinnamon and 1 teaspoon brown sugar in 2 cups of water. Boil it until there is 1 1/2 cups of liquid left, strain it and drink it hot with a little milk. You can substitute honey for the brown sugar. In India, we use many such home remedies from our grandmothers to avoid overusing antibiotics.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | March 29, 2008
A few weeks ago, Emily Bell, one of my long-time assistants, called to tell me about a new recipe she had created. I knew from the excitement in her voice that this was something special. She had taken a retro appetizer from the '80s -- baked Brie -- and updated it. A small, 8-ounce round was topped with a glaze prepared with apricot preserves, sauteed onions, a splash of red-wine vinegar and some country Dijon. Then sliced almonds were sprinkled over the wheel before it was baked. Served warm with thin crackers and sliced fruit, the cheese had been a huge hit with her family.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | January 23, 2008
Steak with onions and balsamic vinegar cooked to a sweet glaze is a perfect dinner. Linguine with fresh basil and tomatoes makes a colorful side dish. Balsamic vinegar is made in Modena, Italy. To be sure you are buying good-quality vinegar, check the labels; grapes should be the only ingredient. Lesser-quality vinegars have brown sugar added. Top-quality balsamic vinegars are aged 25 to 50 years and are used drop by drop. Choose a medium-priced one for cooking. Wine suggestion: Hearty steak with powerful balsamic vinegar is an occasion for a powerful Italian barolo.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | January 10, 2008
I have a 3-year-old and am expecting a new baby in a few weeks. I hate to use harsh chemicals to clean our house and usually rely on good old soap and hot water, sometimes with vinegar or baking soda. I use bleach or Bon Ami sparingly for some things. I found a recipe for a home cleaner spray -- a simple mixture of white vinegar, water and a few drops of essential oil for fragrance. I spray this mixture everywhere, confident that I could eat it if I had to. It does a great job on the stainless kitchen sink, microwave, countertops and bathroom sink.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | December 27, 2007
I would like to try the cinnamon, lime juice and vinegar combo mentioned in your column for weight loss. What is the recipe? My husband is diabetic, so we just started using cinnamon extract made in the drip coffee-maker. How much lime and vinegar do we need to add? How much should we drink? And is the (shudder) vinegar necessary? Many readers want this recipe, and the person who came up with it agreed to share it in detail. Here is Lisa's Weight Loss Elixir: Put five decaffeinated green tea bags in 5 cups of water and bring to a full boil.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | December 26, 2007
There's a lot of hoity-toity food around these days, and we like a lot of it. On the other hand, there is much to be said for voluntary simplicity. Consider the good, old-fashioned Yankee pot roast. Here it is, a meal (almost) in a pot. The pot roast includes a little cider vinegar to tenderize the beef and add a teensy tang. Robin Mather Jenkins writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Old-Fashioned Pot Roast Makes 8 servings -- Total time: 8 hours and 15 minutes 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt freshly ground pepper 1 beef chuck roast, 2 1/2 to 3 pounds, trimmed 3 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 cup beef or chicken broth 2 tablespoons quick-mixing flour, such as Wondra 8 red potatoes, halved 8 small carrots 2 yellow onions, quartered 1/3 cup apple-cider vinegar Combine the all-purpose flour, salt and pepper to taste in a large resealable plastic bag. Add the meat; seal.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | October 24, 2007
How do good old dishes get forgotten? In our chop-chop-steak world, we often forget about the fine flavors that come from something long marinated and slowly braised. We also forget about whole families of meats, especially game. I know more men who hunt than any of my colleagues, but that's largely because my husband comes from a family of hunters. Venison, duck, pheasant, quail and various fish are commonplace at family gatherings. No matter. The man of the house doesn't need a shotgun for you to make this old German standby, hasenpfeffer ("pepper(ed)
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