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NEWS
October 25, 2004
DONALD CHARLES VINCI, Age 57, of Ephrata, PA formerly of Baltimore, MD, died Friday, October 22, 2004 in the Lancaster General Hospital, Lancaster, PA. He is the husband of Roberta E. (Bobbie) Rayner Vinci. The couple was married 33 years this past September 4. Born in Baltimore he is the son of Constance (Norwood) Vinci of Baltimore and the late Charles Vinci. Mr. Vinci has been employed as a salesman for the Mark Tree Inc., of Baltimore for the past 38 years. He was a member of the Tanglewood Manor Golf Club and the Quarreyville American Legion Post.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
They have so much in common, these three long-dead holy women, their corpses dripping with jewels, that it's as though they've been calling back and forth to one another from across the centuries. Now that their images are in the same room at the American Visionary Art Museum , the murmur of their voices is almost audible. There's St. Kateri, holding a bouquet of her talisman - lilies - and reciting the Lord's Prayer in the Mohawk language. Embedded in the icon is a vial of water taken from the spring where Kateri lived in the 17th century.
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NEWS
July 9, 2006
On May 29, 2006, in Ft. Lauderdale, FL, TONI ROSE VINCI formerly of Roberton Avenue in Baltimore City, beloved partner of Barbara Rennie, devoted daughter of the late Frank S. Vinci and Dorothy Bonadio (nee Meyers) beloved sister of Vicki C. Howes and her husband David, dear aunt of Danielle L., and Dustin L. Howes, great aunt of Cheyenne R., and Victoria S. Cameron. Friends may gather on Tuesday, July 11 at the CVACH/ROSEDALE FUNERAL HOME, 1211 Chesaco Avenue from 5 to 6 P.M. A Memorial Service will begin at 6 P.M. Cremation private.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2012
The da Vinci robotic technology allows doctors to perform more precise surgeries. The technique also enables patients to recover more quickly with fewer complications in many cases. The technique is used to perform many different types of surgeries. Dr. Gavin Henry, program director of the surgical residency at Saint Agnes Hospital in Baltimore, uses it over traditional lobectomy surgery to treat patients with lung cancer. The hospital said Henry is poised to outpace every surgeon in Maryland in the use of robotic technology for this operation.
NEWS
December 22, 2003
On December 19, 2003, CONCETTINA M.; beloved wife of the late Lawrence J. Vinci; devoted mother of Concetta M. "Connie" Vinci; loving aunt of Bridget C. Singleton, Concetta Kraus and husband Joseph, Concetta Miles and husband Raymond and Concetta Marie Dobbyn and husband Ronald; dearest great-aunt of Bridget P. Singleton, Albert Frank DiLeonardi and Susan Marie McClung. Also survived by numerous other nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the Witzke Funeral Home of Catonsville, Inc., 1630 Edmondson Ave. (1 mile west of beltway exit 14)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 1, 2009
Painter. Scientist. Inventor. Designer. Engineer. Visionary. Genius. Has there ever been a man with more labels attached to his name than Leonardo da Vinci? Probably not. In a world where mere mortals struggle to master just one profession, da Vinci seemed to master them all. He painted "The Mona Lisa" more than 500 years ago, and it's still probably the most famous painting in the world. He was a key developer of the camera obscura, an early projection device whose descendants include the still camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth L. Piccirillo and Elizabeth L. Piccirillo,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2004
Leonardo da Vinci has been dead for almost 485 years, but theatergoers can still get to know the Renaissance man, thanks to "movement virtuoso" Daniel Stein and award-winning puppeteer Robert Smythe. Their first collaborative work, Measuring Man, uses Leonardo as inspiration for a performance that includes puppetry, movement and stand-up comedy and asks the question: "What does it take to risk something and then fail only to risk something again?" - an issue the artist faced thanks to the burden of his unfinished works.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer | June 14, 1992
Two or three times every week, Helen Vinci visited her husband, Frank, at the Veterans Administration Hospital at Perry Point where he was being treated as an Alzheimer's patient.Then one July day last year, Mrs. Vinci found herself without a husband.With no warning, the hospital released Mr. Vinci to a niece. Soon after, Mrs. Vinci began receiving letters from a lawyer. Mr. Vinci was revoking her power-of-attorney, the lawyer wrote in one letter. "He does not want to have any contact with you," said another.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2012
The da Vinci robotic technology allows doctors to perform more precise surgeries. The technique also enables patients to recover more quickly with fewer complications in many cases. The technique is used to perform many different types of surgeries. Dr. Gavin Henry, program director of the surgical residency at Saint Agnes Hospital in Baltimore, uses it over traditional lobectomy surgery to treat patients with lung cancer. The hospital said Henry is poised to outpace every surgeon in Maryland in the use of robotic technology for this operation.
NEWS
February 15, 1996
A 63-year-old Ferndale man was beaten and stabbed in the throat with a foot-long piece of wood in his home yesterday by an acquaintance who then robbed him, county police said.Rosario L. Vinci of the first block of Mapledale Road was treated and released at North Arundel Hospital.Police said Mr. Vinci's assailant visited him shortly before midnight Tuesday and after they had been in the basement for a while, demanded money.The man the man -- known only as John -- began to beat Mr. Vinci, threatened to kill his elderly mother, who was asleep upstairs, and again demanded money, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 1, 2009
Painter. Scientist. Inventor. Designer. Engineer. Visionary. Genius. Has there ever been a man with more labels attached to his name than Leonardo da Vinci? Probably not. In a world where mere mortals struggle to master just one profession, da Vinci seemed to master them all. He painted "The Mona Lisa" more than 500 years ago, and it's still probably the most famous painting in the world. He was a key developer of the camera obscura, an early projection device whose descendants include the still camera.
NEWS
By Tim Swift | September 27, 2009
EXHIBIT 'Da Vinci - The Genius': Most know Leonardo Da Vinci as a visionary artist, but he wasn't a bad engineer either. This new show - making its East Coast debut - features more than 65 re-creations of Da Vinci's groundbreaking inventions along with a scientific examination of "The Mona Lisa." Opens Saturday at the Maryland Science Center. Web: mdsci.org DVD 'Away We Go': Where do you settle down when you have no roots? That's the challenge of a couple (John Krasinski and Maya Rudolph, above)
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
In Leonardo da Vinci's famous painting, Mona Lisa gazes off into the distance, smiling faintly and, some say, mysteriously. But on the walls of a West Annapolis art supply store, Mona Lisa stands behind prison bars, sports a nose ring and hawks everything from eclairs to sushi. She grimaces, smokes a cigarette and grins to reveal a mouthful of oversized teeth. For two decades, customers and staff have brought renderings of that image to Art Things on Annapolis Street. More than 500 versions of her face decorate the walls and windows of the shop.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
In Leonardo da Vinci's famous painting, Mona Lisa gazes off into the distance, smiling faintly and, some say, mysteriously. But on the walls of a West Annapolis art supply store, Mona Lisa stands behind prison bars, sports a nose ring and hawks everything from eclairs to sushi. She grimaces, smokes a cigarette and grins to reveal a mouthful of oversized teeth. For two decades, customers and staff have brought renderings of that image to Art Things on Annapolis Street. More than 500 versions of her face decorate the walls and windows of the shop.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | November 12, 2006
THE DA VINCI CODE -- Sony Pictures Home Entertainment -- $29.96 Ron Howard's too-faithful film version of The Da Vinci Code serves as an engrossing travelogue and an intriguing exercise in faux history and even faux-er theology. That it never proves as cunningly compelling as Dan Brown's giddy pleasure of a book is less the fault of the story than of Howard's unwillingness to take the necessary liberties to make it more cinematic. Tom Hanks, partnered with Howard for a third time (after Splash and Apollo 13)
NEWS
July 9, 2006
On May 29, 2006, in Ft. Lauderdale, FL, TONI ROSE VINCI formerly of Roberton Avenue in Baltimore City, beloved partner of Barbara Rennie, devoted daughter of the late Frank S. Vinci and Dorothy Bonadio (nee Meyers) beloved sister of Vicki C. Howes and her husband David, dear aunt of Danielle L., and Dustin L. Howes, great aunt of Cheyenne R., and Victoria S. Cameron. Friends may gather on Tuesday, July 11 at the CVACH/ROSEDALE FUNERAL HOME, 1211 Chesaco Avenue from 5 to 6 P.M. A Memorial Service will begin at 6 P.M. Cremation private.
NEWS
December 25, 1994
Sadie VinciConfectionary ownerSadie Vinci, the retired owner of a confectionary store and luncheonette that her father founded in the late 1890s in the Druid Hill Park area, died Thursday of Alzheimer's disease and cancer at Sinai Hospital. She was 80.She went to work for Vinci and Sons Confectionary in the 2300 block of N. Fulton Ave. after she graduated from the Institute of Notre Dame high school in the 1930s. For a while, she and her mother ran the business together.Ms. Vinci, who grew up near the family store, retired and closed it in 1987.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 2002
LIKE LEONARDO DA Vinci, Ted Brown of Severna Park is something of a Renaissance man. But don't call him that. He doesn't take kindly to flattery. "You win a chess game," he grumbles, "and you're Bobby Fischer." The 71-year-old retired educator, who holds a doctorate in education from the University of Maryland and was principal at Belvedere and Folger McKinsey elementary schools, finds nothing out of the ordinary about his accomplishments. His interest in linguistics - he speaks French, German and Spanish - is a hobby, he says.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 10, 2006
BEIJING --Chinese authorities ordered theaters nationwide to stop showing The Da Vinci Code yesterday after Chinese Catholics warned that the film could threaten social stability. The film, based on the best-selling novel by Dan Brown, has long been criticized as insulting to the Catholic Church but has already earned more at the box office than any other film shown in China this year, and it was seen within the local industry as a contender to overtake Titanic as the highest-grossing film here in history.
TRAVEL
By SUSAN SPANO and SUSAN SPANO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2006
PARIS -- When The Da Vinci Code opens this weekend in the United States, one of the first places moviegoers will see is the Louvre, where the story starts. Director Ron Howard was allowed to film in the museum, so moviegoers will see the real thing: architect I.M. Pei's Pyramid, the 1,450-foot Grande Galerie and the Salle des Etats where Leonardo da Vinci's "Mona Lisa" hangs. Since the filming there last spring, the museum has distanced itself from the movie, reflecting the French art establishment's well-known scorn for popular culture and the Louvre's weariness with the phenomenon created by The Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown's controversial 2003 mystery about the supposed secret history of Christianity.
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