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Vincent Van Gogh

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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 20, 1990
Perhaps no artist fascinates other artists so much as Vincent Van Gogh. The stumpy Dutchman, who saw things no other human ever saw and managed heroically to get the vision on canvas, was by turns self-destructive, arrogant, crazed, self-pitying, manipulative, crass, ambitious and loud. Plus, he cut off an ear, a great career move, though I doubt he knew it at the time.Not two months ago Akira Kurosawa was lost in ruminations about him in his "Dreams"; and before that, filmmakers as far apart on the spectrum as Paul Cox and Kirk Douglas had wrestled with him and his demons.
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April 16, 2010
Madness vs. genius In ‘The Swan Thieves," author Elizabeth Kostova writes about a gifted painter who is afflicted with bipolar disorder. She made up her story. Kay Redfield Jamison actually lived it. Jamison, a psychiatrist at the John Hopkins University who has chronicled her battle with manic-depressive illness, is scheduled to speak Monday night at the Walters Art Museum on what she hypothesizes is a link between creative genius and the particular form of mental illness characterized by frenzied bursts of energy and near-catatonic lows.
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April 16, 2010
Madness vs. genius In ‘The Swan Thieves," author Elizabeth Kostova writes about a gifted painter who is afflicted with bipolar disorder. She made up her story. Kay Redfield Jamison actually lived it. Jamison, a psychiatrist at the John Hopkins University who has chronicled her battle with manic-depressive illness, is scheduled to speak Monday night at the Walters Art Museum on what she hypothesizes is a link between creative genius and the particular form of mental illness characterized by frenzied bursts of energy and near-catatonic lows.
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By Robert Cross and Robert Cross,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 10, 1997
AIX-EN-PROVENCE, France -- Painters know the region well because it has served so beautifully as subject matter: the French-blue Mediterranean, gnarled black-and-silver olive trees, chalky mountains, flirtatious villages, timeless brasseries and, of course, the ruins of an ancient Roman domain.Last fall, that fabulous setting attracted a swarm of amateur artists from Santa Barbara, Calif., who gathered noisily one rainy October morning in the medieval darkness of the breakfast room at Hotel Les Augustins.
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By Robert Cross and Robert Cross,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 10, 1997
AIX-EN-PROVENCE, France -- Painters know the region well because it has served so beautifully as subject matter: the French-blue Mediterranean, gnarled black-and-silver olive trees, chalky mountains, flirtatious villages, timeless brasseries and, of course, the ruins of an ancient Roman domain.Last fall, that fabulous setting attracted a swarm of amateur artists from Santa Barbara, Calif., who gathered noisily one rainy October morning in the medieval darkness of the breakfast room at Hotel Les Augustins.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 25, 1998
To the world, Vincent van Gogh was the quintessential starving artist, who never received recognition in his lifetime and committed suicide at 37 thinking himself a failure.That he is now established as one of the greatest and most beloved artists of all time - that in 1990 his "Portrait of Dr. Gachet" sold for the world-record price of $82 million - may be the cruelest story in the history of art.The story's true, but it has been fed by a legend that's not. According to popular lore, van Gogh sold only one painting in his entire life.
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By Los Angeles Times | November 27, 2003
Forty works that may - or may not - have been made by Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh are on view at the Breda Museum in the Netherlands. The exhibit is the result of research by the museum's curator, Ron Dirven, to track down hundreds of the artist's works said to have been dispersed at Breda's flea market in 1902. As the story goes, van Gogh abandoned a huge cache of his work in 1885, when he left his family home in the village of Neunen. His mother moved to nearby Breda a few months later, taking several chests of her son's work with her. The chests ended up in the care of a carpenter who gave them to a second-hand merchant.
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By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 29, 2002
Vanilla has long been the background noise of flavoring, so taken for granted that the phrase plain vanilla seems redundant. No more. Cooks have discovered a new appreciation for the full, elegant flavor vanilla can add. It's hard to imagine baking sweets without a teaspoon or two of vanilla. According to Anne Wilder, founder of Baltimore-based Vann's Spices, cooks are discovering how well vanilla can jazz up savory dishes as well. She supplies vanilla beans and extract to a lot of top chefs and says some of them are getting adventurous, combining vanilla with scallops and duck, and are even exploring vanilla's affinity with lobster.
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Reporter | November 12, 2006
When tenor saxophone player Walt Weiskopf appears today at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the 10-part jazz suite he'll perform will match perfectly with his surroundings. He and his band will begin with Sight to Sound, a suite Weiskopf wrote in 2003 that includes movements named for Joan Miro, Pablo Picasso, Camille Pissarro, Claude Monet, Salvador Dali, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and Vincent Van Gogh. (The opening is titled "Sight" and the finale "Sound," thus Sight to Sound.) THE WALT WEISKOPF SIGHT TO SOUND SEXTET / / Performs at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive -- 5 p.m. today -- $10-$27 -- www.baltimorechamberjazz.
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By Josh Mooney | October 18, 1991
VINCENT AND THEOHemdale Home Video$92.95Director Robert Altman, one of the few maverick American filmmakers of the last 25 years, enters the realm of the artist's bio-pic with "Vincent and Theo"; as usual, he presents us with something fresh, unexpected and moving.Artist Vincent Van Gogh has long been the subject of films, ranging from documentaries to dramas like "Lust for Life," starring Kirk Douglas. Mr. Altman's take is decidedly different from much of what's been done before -- stresses the relationship between Vincent and his brother Theo, and this is as it should be.A brave and tortured man, like his brother, Theo had a task that was nearly as daunting as the artist's: He attempted to clear a path for Vincent's radical work in the art world (and the world of finance as well -- their existence involved a continuous state of near-poverty)
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 20, 1990
Perhaps no artist fascinates other artists so much as Vincent Van Gogh. The stumpy Dutchman, who saw things no other human ever saw and managed heroically to get the vision on canvas, was by turns self-destructive, arrogant, crazed, self-pitying, manipulative, crass, ambitious and loud. Plus, he cut off an ear, a great career move, though I doubt he knew it at the time.Not two months ago Akira Kurosawa was lost in ruminations about him in his "Dreams"; and before that, filmmakers as far apart on the spectrum as Paul Cox and Kirk Douglas had wrestled with him and his demons.
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By Kevin Cowherd | August 12, 1992
Recently I became aware of an alarming trend in the pet world which shows signs of spiraling out of control unless stopped immediately.The trend first came to light when I visited my friend Bob, who has the misfortune to own a cat.In his defense, Bob inherited the cat through marriage, which always struck me as excellent grounds for an annulment or divorce.There is not a judge in the land who would rule against a husband if he cited a cat as the reason for wanting out of a marriage.Mental cruelty, irreconcilable differences . . . you can lob any charge you want at a spouse if she insists on keeping a cat.Anyway, as soon as I walked into Bob's living room, the cat stopped clawing the drapes and --ed to the couch.
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By Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2010
'Turner to Cezanne' Where: Corcoran Gallery of Art, 500 17th St. NW, Washington When: Through April 25 (The museum is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays.) What : Exhibition featuring a group of 19th- and 20th-century paintings and works on paper from the Davies Collection, National Museum of Wales. The 53 masterpieces — many of which have rarely been exhibited outside of Europe — include impressionist and postimpressionist artworks by Paul Cezanne, Edouard Manet, Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, J.M.W.
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