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Vincent Price

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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,New York Times News Service READINGS Film Critic | October 27, 1993
Mellifluous of voice and regal of bearing, with an aristocrat's cheekbones, the unflappability of a butler and a sense of hamminess large enough to fill all the smokehouses in Virginia, Vincent Price, who died Monday at 82 of lung cancer, may not have been a great actor but he was a great movie personality.Best of all, he was the total professional, and even in the shlockiest of vehicles -- try "Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine" (1965) -- he exuded the savoir faire, the sangfroid, the self-possession of the effete cad that was his cinematic niche and was, by all reports, the exact opposite of his private personality.
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NEWS
April 18, 2008
HAZEL COURT, 82 Star of horror movies Hazel Court, a British beauty who co-starred with the likes of Boris Karloff and Vincent Price in horror movies of the 1950s and '60s, has died. She was 82. Ms. Court died Tuesday at her home near Lake Tahoe, Calif., of a heart attack, her daughter said Wednesday. While she had a substantial acting career in England and on American TV, Ms. Court was perhaps best known for her work in such films as 1963's The Raven. She co-starred with Price, Karloff and Peter Lorre in a Roger Corman take on the classic Edgar Allan Poe poem.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | October 26, 1993
A wealth of worthwhile options are on tap tonight, including a few that stress the spooky: a biography of Vincent Price, a repeat of Disney's classic "Legend of Sleepy Hollow" cartoon, and the broadcast network premiere of "Misery."* "The John Larroquette Show" (9-9:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Ted Shackelford, formerly of "Knots Landing," guest-stars as Jim, an old friend who visits John Hemingway (Larroquette) to reminisce about their drunken binges together -- one of which, according to Jim, ended with them having a sexual encounter together.
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | January 15, 2006
JOHN WATERS MIGHT HAVE A Baltimore ZIP code, but his true address is somewhere over the rainbow. Waters, of course, is the taboo-trouncing filmmaker whose movies, which are set in Charm City (Crybaby, Pink Flamingos, Hairspray, etc.), are distinguished as much by their high gross-out content as their underlying sweetness, a kind of warped optimism. Now, the 59-year-old auteur is taking his larger-than-life persona to the small screen. Beginning Feb. 3, here!, the nation's first gay television network, will broadcast John Waters Presents Movies That Will Corrupt You, the filmmaker's first foray into television.
NEWS
April 18, 2008
HAZEL COURT, 82 Star of horror movies Hazel Court, a British beauty who co-starred with the likes of Boris Karloff and Vincent Price in horror movies of the 1950s and '60s, has died. She was 82. Ms. Court died Tuesday at her home near Lake Tahoe, Calif., of a heart attack, her daughter said Wednesday. While she had a substantial acting career in England and on American TV, Ms. Court was perhaps best known for her work in such films as 1963's The Raven. She co-starred with Price, Karloff and Peter Lorre in a Roger Corman take on the classic Edgar Allan Poe poem.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 17, 2003
The promoters of the flip, zesty, 94-minute anthology known only as The Animation Show promise, in their ads, "additional films and surprises." That might be a sure-fire marketing tool in a town overflowing with cartoon geeks, but in most cities they'd be better off letting their sleekest, blackest cat out of the bag. Tim Burton's oft-celebrated, rarely seen 1982 short Vincent is this show's chief "surprise." Though it runs a mere six minutes, it's enough to restore faith in Burton's talents after his herky-jerky Planet of the Apes.
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | January 15, 2006
JOHN WATERS MIGHT HAVE A Baltimore ZIP code, but his true address is somewhere over the rainbow. Waters, of course, is the taboo-trouncing filmmaker whose movies, which are set in Charm City (Crybaby, Pink Flamingos, Hairspray, etc.), are distinguished as much by their high gross-out content as their underlying sweetness, a kind of warped optimism. Now, the 59-year-old auteur is taking his larger-than-life persona to the small screen. Beginning Feb. 3, here!, the nation's first gay television network, will broadcast John Waters Presents Movies That Will Corrupt You, the filmmaker's first foray into television.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | April 28, 2002
True, the glasses are goofy-looking, and the strain on your eyes can be a bit much. But when 3-D movies are good, they're worth the headaches. Like when the evil henchman from House of Wax jumps out of the audience and onto the screen. Or when a desperate Grace Kelly in Dial M for Murder lunges for your hand while she's being strangled. Or when the eyeball in Friday the 13th Part 3 lands in your lap. Ladies and gents, that's entertainment: the kind of good time only a 3-D movie can provide.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Woestendiek and Sun Reporter | April 10, 2005
Oh, don't you remember, a long time ago When two little babes, their names I don't know Were stolen away one bright summer day And lost in the woods, I've heard people say --Traditional lullaby As a mother, she would sing it to her children. As a child, she would sing it to her pets. And whenever the world came crashing down around her, as it often did for Mary Leona Gage, she would sing it to herself. Growing up in the Piney Woods of east Texas, her friends were mostly imaginary or four-legged - fairies, "weed people" and wildlife.
NEWS
By Mike Burns | May 4, 2000
YOU COULD CALL it "Son of the Fly," a real-life version of the classic Vincent Price sci-fi movie. But it may be more of a "War of the Words" between scientific competitors in the race to complete the human genetic code. Celera Genomics, the Maryland biotechnology firm that decoded the genetic map of the fruit fly, mistakenly included pieces of human genetic material in initial data posted on its Web site. The "human contamination" of the published fruit fly genome, containing some 180 million chemical building blocks, is not fatal to the blueprint.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 17, 2003
The promoters of the flip, zesty, 94-minute anthology known only as The Animation Show promise, in their ads, "additional films and surprises." That might be a sure-fire marketing tool in a town overflowing with cartoon geeks, but in most cities they'd be better off letting their sleekest, blackest cat out of the bag. Tim Burton's oft-celebrated, rarely seen 1982 short Vincent is this show's chief "surprise." Though it runs a mere six minutes, it's enough to restore faith in Burton's talents after his herky-jerky Planet of the Apes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | April 28, 2002
True, the glasses are goofy-looking, and the strain on your eyes can be a bit much. But when 3-D movies are good, they're worth the headaches. Like when the evil henchman from House of Wax jumps out of the audience and onto the screen. Or when a desperate Grace Kelly in Dial M for Murder lunges for your hand while she's being strangled. Or when the eyeball in Friday the 13th Part 3 lands in your lap. Ladies and gents, that's entertainment: the kind of good time only a 3-D movie can provide.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,New York Times News Service READINGS Film Critic | October 27, 1993
Mellifluous of voice and regal of bearing, with an aristocrat's cheekbones, the unflappability of a butler and a sense of hamminess large enough to fill all the smokehouses in Virginia, Vincent Price, who died Monday at 82 of lung cancer, may not have been a great actor but he was a great movie personality.Best of all, he was the total professional, and even in the shlockiest of vehicles -- try "Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine" (1965) -- he exuded the savoir faire, the sangfroid, the self-possession of the effete cad that was his cinematic niche and was, by all reports, the exact opposite of his private personality.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | October 26, 1993
A wealth of worthwhile options are on tap tonight, including a few that stress the spooky: a biography of Vincent Price, a repeat of Disney's classic "Legend of Sleepy Hollow" cartoon, and the broadcast network premiere of "Misery."* "The John Larroquette Show" (9-9:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Ted Shackelford, formerly of "Knots Landing," guest-stars as Jim, an old friend who visits John Hemingway (Larroquette) to reminisce about their drunken binges together -- one of which, according to Jim, ended with them having a sexual encounter together.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | December 14, 1990
EDWARD Scissorhands,'' directed by Tim Burton, is a smartly, sweetly told fairy tale that goes a little dark as it draws to a close.The downturn, almost at the end, doesn't really scuttle the film, but it would have been that much better without it.''Edward Scissorhands'' begins on exactly the right note. This is a fairy tale, and Burton, who co-wrote the story on which the film is based, doesn't want us to forget it.As the movie begins, we are given a closeup of the castle in which the Scissor boy lives.
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By Caryn James and Caryn James,New York Times News Service | August 29, 1995
In 1968, long before he animated "Who Framed Roger Rabbit," Richard Williams began an ambitious, elaborate feature called "The Thief and the Cobbler," about a brave cobbler, an Arabian princess and a bumbling thief.His decades-long project, retitled "Arabian Knight," opened Friday in an end-of-summer slot usually reserved for films being tossed away. "Arabian Knight" deserves better. It's no dog, though it is a fascinating problem.Mr. Williams' wide-screen animation is among the most glorious and lively ever created.
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