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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1998
The suits at Universal are doubtless hoping that lightning will strike twice with "Psycho," director Gus Van Sant's much-hyped remake of the Alfred Hitchcock groundbreaker that earned a ton of money for Paramount back in 1960.Van Sant certainly wouldn't mind either - what director doesn't yearn to be called a genius? And Anne Heche (cast here as Marion Crane) probably wouldn't mind a career as long and as steady as her predecessor in that fatal shower, Janet Leigh.But at least one person associated with "Psycho" 1998 probably would prefer that history not repeat itself.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 9, 2009
Middle-class marital strain makes women svelte and focused, men doughy and awkward, and everybody stupid. That's the inadvertent message of "Couples Retreat," which finds it as impossible to locate a laugh in glittering Bora Bora as it was for Operation Enduring Freedom to nail Osama bin Laden in gritty Tora Bora. Some of the finest comic actors of their generation, including Jason Bateman (as a character named Jason), Jon Favreau (Joey) and Vince Vaughn (Dave), go up in tropical-restaurant flames as husbands who vacation with their wives at the Eden resort in French Polynesia, run by Jean Reno's "couple whisperer" Marcel.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 9, 2009
Middle-class marital strain makes women svelte and focused, men doughy and awkward, and everybody stupid. That's the inadvertent message of "Couples Retreat," which finds it as impossible to locate a laugh in glittering Bora Bora as it was for Operation Enduring Freedom to nail Osama bin Laden in gritty Tora Bora. Some of the finest comic actors of their generation, including Jason Bateman (as a character named Jason), Jon Favreau (Joey) and Vince Vaughn (Dave), go up in tropical-restaurant flames as husbands who vacation with their wives at the Eden resort in French Polynesia, run by Jean Reno's "couple whisperer" Marcel.
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By Ray Frager | March 10, 2009
Dodgeball 5:30 p.m. [FX] No, it's not coverage of some elementary school recess. It's the movie featuring Vince Vaughn in a typically Vaughnian role and Ben Stiller (left) in one of his "wacky" ones. The cast also features Curtis Armstrong, the beloved "Booger" from the Revenge of the Nerds movies.
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 14, 2000
NEW YORK -- Whether he's vying for a film role or plopping down $100 on a football game, Vince Vaughn has probably figured out the odds of success. The lanky Vaughn, who plays an FBI agent set loose in the mind of a serial killer in "The Cell," opening Friday, has made a life of assessing risk. Vaughn's father, Vernon, is a gambler who made his son as comfortable at a race track as at a casting call. Vaughn said his dad made a go of professional gambling before being pushed into sales by Vernon's mother's disapproval.
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By Ray Frager | March 10, 2009
Dodgeball 5:30 p.m. [FX] No, it's not coverage of some elementary school recess. It's the movie featuring Vince Vaughn in a typically Vaughnian role and Ben Stiller (left) in one of his "wacky" ones. The cast also features Curtis Armstrong, the beloved "Booger" from the Revenge of the Nerds movies.
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May 2, 2008
When director Jon Favreau isn't calling the shots on his own movies, you can find him in front of the camera as a character actor. Swingers (1996). In his big break, Favreau starred as a lovelorn schlub who gets schooled by his gregarious friend (Vince Vaughn) on the swinging singles scene. Friends (1997). Favreau showed up on the hit series as a rich guy who braved the Ultimate Fighting Octagon to impress Monica. Daredevil (2003). In his other foray into comic-book movies, Favreau played the blind superhero's law partner, Foggy Nelson.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 2, 2006
The Break-Up is half of a great movie: a biting, hard-hearted look at what happens when former lovers take off the gloves and begin using each other as emotional punching bags. It gets the sense of betrayal right, the absolute fury that the pig you've been sleeping next to all this time not only doesn't understand his or her piggishness, but seems to revel in it. But The Break-Up doesn't offer insight into how the mutual attraction between Vince Vaughn's Gary, a narcissistic, good-time-loving schlub, and Jennifer Aniston's Brooke, a cultured, meticulous, Type-A poster girl, arose in the first place.
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By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 21, 2003
Acarload of women on a "girls' night out" see a naked man with too much beer in him running down the road. These women aren't scandalized so much as they are perversely fascinated. They want to look away, but this goofy drunken nude guy is strangely compelling. And as they get closer, the driver is horrified to discover that the fleshy, curly-haired fellow is her new husband. He's just streaking to have fun, he insists, but she sensibly demands that he get in the car. So as her giddily appalled friends scrunch over, he plants his plump derriere on the seat next to them.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 18, 2000
"The Cell" looks spectacular. If only it never opened its mouth. First-time director Tarsem Singh, a veteran of the music-video scene, crams this excursion into a tortured psyche with so much vividly wondrous imagery that he nearly compensates for a story that takes a while to get going, roars through all the pretty scenery, then stumbles to the finish line as the filmmakers apparently lose interest. Jennifer Lopez stars as Catherine Deane, the world's most well-coifed psychologist, so intuitively sensitive to her charges' needs that her colleagues regard her as special (sorry, that's about as deep as the analysis of Lopez's character goes)
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May 2, 2008
When director Jon Favreau isn't calling the shots on his own movies, you can find him in front of the camera as a character actor. Swingers (1996). In his big break, Favreau starred as a lovelorn schlub who gets schooled by his gregarious friend (Vince Vaughn) on the swinging singles scene. Friends (1997). Favreau showed up on the hit series as a rich guy who braved the Ultimate Fighting Octagon to impress Monica. Daredevil (2003). In his other foray into comic-book movies, Favreau played the blind superhero's law partner, Foggy Nelson.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2007
American Gangster What it's about: A Harlem criminal mastermind puts together a huge heroin operation with drugs smuggled out of Vietnam in soldiers' coffins and a wholesome army of outlaws. Rated: R The scoop: It plays like a deluxe network-TV miniseries, but with all the nudity, profanity and gore the networks would cut out. Grade: C+ Bee Movie What it's about: Jerry Seinfeld's Barry B. Benson, a squat, big-eyed buzzer, attempts to break out of a job stirring honey in the hive and ends up falling for a human florist (Renee Zellweger)
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By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 17, 2006
Wrapping up one of the richest Baltimore Playwrights Festivals in the event's 25-year history, the two coming-of-age plays that opened last weekend are the latest proof that this showcase of new work has itself come of age. It's not just the writing that's impressive; there's expert handling of up-to-the-minute cyber details in Rich Espey's Hope's Arbor and imaginative flourishes in Ira Gamerman's Split. Both productions also feature notable performances, many by relative newcomers. The title character in Hope's Arbor is the 17-year-old daughter of recently separated parents.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 2, 2006
The Break-Up is half of a great movie: a biting, hard-hearted look at what happens when former lovers take off the gloves and begin using each other as emotional punching bags. It gets the sense of betrayal right, the absolute fury that the pig you've been sleeping next to all this time not only doesn't understand his or her piggishness, but seems to revel in it. But The Break-Up doesn't offer insight into how the mutual attraction between Vince Vaughn's Gary, a narcissistic, good-time-loving schlub, and Jennifer Aniston's Brooke, a cultured, meticulous, Type-A poster girl, arose in the first place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 14, 2005
Vince Vaughn is spent. He's just finishing up a grueling movie shoot in his hometown of Chicago. "Five-day weeks," he griped of The Break Up. And most every day, he has to get all mushy with Jennifer Aniston. "I know, I know, `Cry me a river,' right?" It's a tough job, but Vaughn is willing to do it. Even if certain tabloids have concocted a whole Vince-Jen romance out of shots of them canoodling on the set. "Lies," she said. "Guess they've gotta sell papers," he said. Vaughn, 35, is the fast-talking charmer who burst on the movie scene with his lady-killer turn in the indie hit Swingers back in '96. He's talking fast and killing the ladies again in his latest.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 5, 2004
Ben Stiller as Detective David Starsky has the scowling, close-to-the-ground focus of an obsessed rat terrier. Owen Wilson as Detective Ken "Hutch" Hutchinson has the laid-back sunniness of those surfing turtles in Finding Nemo. In Starsky & Hutch, a comic remake of the hit 1975-1979 cop series (set, once again, in the fictional Bay City, Calif.), they generate an always humorous, sometimes hilarious chemistry. They're constantly ahead of or behind each other and taking shortcuts or backpedaling to stay even.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1998
A guy you hardly know, save for a few weeks spent clowning around on a tropical island, is going to die unless you agree to spend up to six years rotting away in a Third World prison. What would you do?That's the dilemma presented by "Return to Paradise," a suspenseful, enjoyably not-what-you'd-expect morality play. Featuring a wonderfully nuanced performance from Anne Heche, the film suffers in the end from a script more interested in piquing the conscience than fleshing out its plot and characters.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 2, 2001
Domestic Disturbance is strictly movie-of-the-week stuff. And not very good stuff, at that. This is a relentlessly ordinary thriller in which a boy who's cried "wolf" too often tries to convince his father that his seemingly virtuous stepdad is a murderer. The film features a walk-through performance from John Travolta, a menacing turn by Vince Vaughn (what's else is new?), a weasely turn by Steve Buscemi (ditto) and no twists we don't see from a mile away. The end result isn't bad, but it's nothing to brag about.
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January 3, 2004
As if you didn't already know, the NFL playoffs (4:30-8 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) begin with this weekend's wild-card games. The Ravens take on the Tennessee Titans at M&T Bank Stadium this afternoon. Other games are tonight at 8 on ABC; tomorrow at 1 p.m. on Fox; and tomorrow at 4:30 p.m. on CBS. At a glance Heartbreakers (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) - Sigourney Weaver and Jennifer Love Hewitt star as mother-and-daughter partners in crime who use their powers of seduction to prey on rich men in this 2001 comedy that leans toward the dark side.
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By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 21, 2003
Acarload of women on a "girls' night out" see a naked man with too much beer in him running down the road. These women aren't scandalized so much as they are perversely fascinated. They want to look away, but this goofy drunken nude guy is strangely compelling. And as they get closer, the driver is horrified to discover that the fleshy, curly-haired fellow is her new husband. He's just streaking to have fun, he insists, but she sensibly demands that he get in the car. So as her giddily appalled friends scrunch over, he plants his plump derriere on the seat next to them.
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