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Vinaigrette

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By Ronnie Fein and Ronnie Fein,SPECIAL TO THE STAMFORD ADVOCATE | August 29, 2001
Vinaigrette is like a basic black dress. It is useful in so many ways. Nothing beats this elixir over fresh greens. But it isn't just for tossed salads. Vinaigrette also is a fine marinade: Use it to flavor the boneless chicken breasts you barbecue. And it is a versatile sauce: Serve it with steamed artichokes or boiled lobster. Vinaigrette is simply a blend of vegetable oil and vinegar. To make vinaigrette, simply whisk the ingredients in a small bowl. The usual ratio is about three parts vegetable oil to one part vinegar, but it really depends on how you're using the dressing and on how tangy you like it. What distinguishes a winning recipe is the type of vegetable oil and vinegar you use. A premium, extra-virgin olive oil can make all the difference.
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Kit Waskom Pollard | April 25, 2014
In Maryland, one true harbinger of spring is fresh local asparagus. At Mountain Branch Grille & Pub, executive chef Lee Glanville pairs crunchy grilled stalks of the vegetable with seared scallops, bright corn relish and a smoky and savory tomato vinaigrette. The result is a riot of colors and flavors celebrating the return of spring. SEARED SCALLOPS WITH ASPARAGUS, CORN RELISH AND SMOKED TOMATO VINAIGRETTE Serves four Scallops and asparagus: 12 U/10 dry pack diver scallops Salt and pepper to taste 4 Tablespoons olive oil, divided 3 Tablespoons unsalted butter 20 large asparagus spears, trimmed for grilling 2 cups corn relish 1 cup smoked tomato vinaigrette 1. Prepare grill to cook over high heat.
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By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
Many of us grew up thinking that green beans came from a can. Those soft and water-logged beans were all we knew until we had our eyes were opened up to the true flavor of string beans (the name covers haricot verts, wax beans and green beans) that were fresh and properly cooked. But the problem is how to cook them differently. While steaming in a pan or boiling in salted water work well, it can get a little monotonous. So this time, try grilling. The dry heat evaporates the water inside the beans and concentrates the flavor while also picking up char from the flame.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
Many of us grew up thinking that green beans came from a can. Those soft and water-logged beans were all we knew until we had our eyes were opened up to the true flavor of string beans (the name covers haricot verts, wax beans and green beans) that were fresh and properly cooked. But the problem is how to cook them differently. While steaming in a pan or boiling in salted water work well, it can get a little monotonous. So this time, try grilling. The dry heat evaporates the water inside the beans and concentrates the flavor while also picking up char from the flame.
FEATURES
By Steven Raichlen and Steven Raichlen,Contributing Writer | April 26, 1992
Below are recipes for some of the new vinaigrettes. Use them on grilled fish, poached lobster, roast chicken -- even chops and steaks. Oh, yes, they're also good on salads!Basic vinaigretteMakes 1 cup.AThis classic French recipe serves as a point of departure for our exploration of vinaigrettes. The mustard helps the ingredients emulsify.1 tablespoon Dijon-style mustardsalt and fresh black pepper2 tablespoons red wine vinegar2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice3/4 -1 cup olive oilCombine the mustard, salt and pepper in a large bowl.
FEATURES
By Steven Raichlen and Steven Raichlen,Contributing Writer | April 26, 1992
There once was a time when vinaigrette was just a dressing for a salad. Today, this gossamer sauce is turning up on everything from poached fish to grilled sweetbreads. As Americans seek lighter foods, vinaigrettes have come to replace such classical French sauces as demi-glace and hollandaise. Infinitely varied, quick to prepare, vinaigrettes are adaptable to a wide range of foods. Cholesterol-free, they have become the veritable elixir of youth for a nation obsessed with flavor but unwilling to tolerate fat.Not that vinaigrettes are particularly new. In the Middle Ages, vinaigrette-like sauces were made using verjuice (the juice of unripe grapes)
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN REPORTER | August 16, 2006
Like a ripe tomato, still warm from the vine, and white corn, so crunchy-sweet it hardly needs cooking, a vinaigrette is an essential building block for the perfect summer meal. Vinegar and oil, combined despite their best efforts to remain apart and distinct, give every summer menu item -- from a grilled steak to salad greens -- a chance to be better. "Vinaigrettes are so incredibly versatile," said Real Simple magazine food editor Renee Schettler. "Especially this time of year when we have access to so many vegetables that require only a chop or a slice."
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
A handful of chopped shallots is spooned into the blender, followed by a splash of vinegar, a bit of Dijon mustard, some seasonings, then bruuuuum, the motor roars, a steady stream of olive oil is gradually poured in and voila - vinaigrette. The procedure takes Barry Rumsey, chef-owner of Bicycle restaurant in South Baltimore, less time than boiling an egg, but the results are a marvel. On this particular morning, he's created a pomegranate vinaigrette, a sweet-and-sour accompaniment to an appetizer of arugula and smoked duck breast with caramelized onions and pumpkin seeds.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | February 28, 2007
I always get too much or too little dressing on my salad. How can I get a light coating? Should I buy that spray-on salad dressing? I never advocate buying prepared salad dressings - but I always enjoy listing their ingredients. Here, for the record, in descending order, is what's in Wish-Bone Salad Spritzers Italian Vinaigrette Dressing: high-fructose corn syrup, white-wine vinegar, soybean oil, salt, onion juice, xanthan gum, caramel color, natural flavors and annatto extract. Compare this to the ingredients for homemade vinaigrette: extra-virgin olive oil, good wine vinegar or lemon juice, salt.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | September 5, 1999
SINCE LABOR DAY IS one of the high holy days of smoke and fire, we practitioners of backyard combustion feel an obligation to barbecue something over the three-day weekend. Indeed, I can think of no more pleasing sight than the smoke from thousands of barbecue grills curling toward the heavens, giving thanks to the gods of incineration for another successful summer. I get misty just thinking about it. To ready myself for the big weekend, I cooked a three-course meal on the barbecue grill the other night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2011
I do love looking at Restaurant Week menus. Some of them are so lame! Salt Tavern in Upper Fells Point has a good one. It looks freshly considered -- although, that's a given at Salt, where Jason Ambrose and company regularly overhauls the menu. Also, the RW menu at Salt has more than the usual number of choices but is still focused and manageable. What do you think about Salt's RW menu -- if you haven't been for a while, does it tempt you to go back. First Course (choice of one)
ENTERTAINMENT
By RIchard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2011
We're working on a watermelon story for an upcoming Taste section. Watermelon and feta have become a modern classic pairing, but what else have you seen a chef do with watemelon? Of course, let us know if you've come up with your own creative applications for watermelon. The photo here is of the a watermelon salad at Ranazul in Fulton/Maple Lawn. It features fresh watermelon wedges on an arugula salad in a citrus vinaigrette with shredded manchego cheese and kalamata olives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
Grano Pasta Bar , the popular and often-crowded Italian restaurant in Hampden known for its fantastic pasta, recently opened a second, larger location. Grano, also known as Big Grano, is a few blocks away in a former tea room. With the larger location comes an expanded menu, with more beef, poultry and seafood dishes. But sometimes bigger isn't better. The much larger — yet intimate-feeling — restaurant is a step in the right direction. There is much more space than in the original, cramped location.
NEWS
By Kate McNaboe and Kate McNaboe,katherine.mcnaboe@baltsun.com | July 22, 2009
There's nothing wrong with vanilla ice cream or a vanilla-and-chocolate frozen-yogurt cone. But sometimes you just want something different, something more. Some shops in the Baltimore area have taken that idea to a whole new level, offering frozen treats in wacky flavors or spicing things up, sometimes literally, with out-there toppings. Some of the craziest cold concoctions: Dominion's vegetable ice cream, which comes in spinach, carrot, tomato, sweet potato and jalapeno; Mr. Yogato's peach yogurt with extra-virgin olive oil and balsamic vinaigrette; Pitango Gelato's spicy chocolate, with crushed red chili peppers; Moxley's Old Bay ice cream, for that extra little kick; and Sylvan Beach's margarita ice cream, complete with salt and lime.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | February 28, 2007
I always get too much or too little dressing on my salad. How can I get a light coating? Should I buy that spray-on salad dressing? I never advocate buying prepared salad dressings - but I always enjoy listing their ingredients. Here, for the record, in descending order, is what's in Wish-Bone Salad Spritzers Italian Vinaigrette Dressing: high-fructose corn syrup, white-wine vinegar, soybean oil, salt, onion juice, xanthan gum, caramel color, natural flavors and annatto extract. Compare this to the ingredients for homemade vinaigrette: extra-virgin olive oil, good wine vinegar or lemon juice, salt.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 6, 2007
What to serve when entertaining right after the rush of the holidays? This week, we've invited friends whom we haven't seen in quite a while for supper, but, like many others, my husband and I have feasted on mountains of rich food during the past month and are craving less heavy fare. With that in mind, I sat down to plan the menu. While searching for dishes that are light and refreshing, as well as easy to prepare, I remembered that several weeks ago I had served a delectable watercress salad with an unusual vinaigrette along with soup for out-of-town company.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 6, 2007
What to serve when entertaining right after the rush of the holidays? This week, we've invited friends whom we haven't seen in quite a while for supper, but, like many others, my husband and I have feasted on mountains of rich food during the past month and are craving less heavy fare. With that in mind, I sat down to plan the menu. While searching for dishes that are light and refreshing, as well as easy to prepare, I remembered that several weeks ago I had served a delectable watercress salad with an unusual vinaigrette along with soup for out-of-town company.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | August 9, 2006
What is your favorite bottled vinaigrette? I don't use bottled salad dressing, have never had it in my home and cannot understand its appeal. Bottled dressing invariably lacks the stuff that belongs in a vinaigrette (good olive oil, good vinegar or lemon juice) and is full of stuff that doesn't belong: water, excessive sodium, preservatives, flavorings and, most egregiously, sugar and its cheaper relative, high-fructose corn syrup. Wishbone Italian dressing contains, in descending order: water, soybean oil, vinegar, high-fructose corn syrup, salt, garlic, onion (both dehydrated)
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | August 30, 2006
Lisa Turner of Nottingham was looking for a recipe for marinated tomatoes with grated cheese like the ones that were served at the now-closed Palmer House restaurant in Baltimore. They were a family favorite and she was hoping to be able to make these at home. Jo Ann Nuetzel of Parkville sent in a recipe for tomatoes vinaigrette that she says she has been using since the early 1970s.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN REPORTER | August 16, 2006
Like a ripe tomato, still warm from the vine, and white corn, so crunchy-sweet it hardly needs cooking, a vinaigrette is an essential building block for the perfect summer meal. Vinegar and oil, combined despite their best efforts to remain apart and distinct, give every summer menu item -- from a grilled steak to salad greens -- a chance to be better. "Vinaigrettes are so incredibly versatile," said Real Simple magazine food editor Renee Schettler. "Especially this time of year when we have access to so many vegetables that require only a chop or a slice."
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