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By Kayla Cross and Kayla Cross,The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2009
As visitors take to the cobblestone paths of this town, they are walking along the steps of history. When Vilnius was being built there was an entry fee of one stone per visitor. The collection was used to create the town's walls and roads. Today, entry to the town and many of its historic sites is free. This year Lithuania celebrates its millennium anniversary, and Vilnius styles itself as the European Capital of the World, with its vision to create a city that is open to new ideas and culture.
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TRAVEL
By Kayla Cross and Kayla Cross,The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2009
As visitors take to the cobblestone paths of this town, they are walking along the steps of history. When Vilnius was being built there was an entry fee of one stone per visitor. The collection was used to create the town's walls and roads. Today, entry to the town and many of its historic sites is free. This year Lithuania celebrates its millennium anniversary, and Vilnius styles itself as the European Capital of the World, with its vision to create a city that is open to new ideas and culture.
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NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | May 9, 2008
The letter arrived, mayor to mayor, wishing the newly elected Sheila Dixon the usual "cordial congratulations" and wishes of "great success" on the "demanding and challenging" task she faced. Then the note veered from boilerplate municipal correspondence into far stranger territory: The mayor of Vilnius, Lithuania, wanted to send his Baltimore counterpart a statue of someone he considered among the greatest artists of the 20th century, someone with ties to both their cities, someone who would unite the citizens of two otherwise far-flung towns in a lasting bond.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | May 9, 2008
The letter arrived, mayor to mayor, wishing the newly elected Sheila Dixon the usual "cordial congratulations" and wishes of "great success" on the "demanding and challenging" task she faced. Then the note veered from boilerplate municipal correspondence into far stranger territory: The mayor of Vilnius, Lithuania, wanted to send his Baltimore counterpart a statue of someone he considered among the greatest artists of the 20th century, someone with ties to both their cities, someone who would unite the citizens of two otherwise far-flung towns in a lasting bond.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | June 4, 1991
MOSCOW -- Ignoring the testimony of dozens of eyewitnesses and videotapes, the Soviet prosecutor general's office yesterday issued a report claiming that the 13 Lithuanians who died during the seizure of Vilnius broadcasting facilities in January were not killed by Soviet troops.The conclusion contradicts massive evidence published by both Soviet and Western sources and suggests that the regime of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev is unwilling or unable to acknowledge the truth about the Vilnius killings.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times Diana Jean Schemo of The Sun's Paris Bureau contributed to this article | January 14, 1991
VILNIUS, Lithuania -- Soviet soldiers laughed before they fired automatic weapons at Lithuanian nationalists. Without warning, they shot people in the back. They grabbed axes and bludgeoned 20 people on the head.Survivors of the Soviet army's overnight assault on the Vilnius television tower and broadcast center spoke of such acts of brutality by soldiers sent in tanks and armored personnel carriers to capture the installations."Their eyes were like glass, they were in a trance," said Vaclovas Bernotas, 21, a physics student, who was shot from behind in the left arm.Mindaugas Cernius, 17, was trying to get away from the television tower when, he said, a squad of 20 soldiers, one with a machine gun, opened fire on him from 30 feet away.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 12, 1991
VILNIUS, U.S.S.R. -- Boosted by a landslide victory at the polls, Lithuania's president has called on the United States to warn Moscow to keep its hands off Lithuania.Vytautas Landsbergis also disclosed yesterday that it was President Bush who, during a White House meeting last December, suggested a republic-wide vote "as a way of expressing the nation's will."Landsbergis told reporters the beleaguered Vilnius government has a right to expect a bolder turn in U.S. policy. Meanwhile, the Kremlin called the vote unconstitutional.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | January 15, 1991
WARSAW -- Lithuanian government representatives expressed disappointment yesterday with the Polish government's failure to accord the embattled Vilnius authorities the diplomatic recognition they need to survive an incursion of Soviet tanks."
NEWS
By The Los Angeles Times | January 17, 1991
BUDAPEST, 1956. Prague, 1968. Vilnius, 1991. Each time Soviet tanks were sent to crush subject peoples who had become bold enough to resist Moscow's rule. Each time the brutal crackdowns were accompanied by similarly unbelievable claims.The independence movements that the Red Army extinguished in Hungary and Czechoslovakia were condemned as "counter-revolutionary," a designation that automatically put them beyond the pale of Soviet tolerance and made military force obligatory.The harsh and unmistakable message of the military takeover in Lithuania won't be misheard in those other republics that have also declared their sovereignty.
TRAVEL
By BEVERLY BEYETTE and BEVERLY BEYETTE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2006
VILNIUS, LITHUANIA -- The turrets, the ancient city gates and the cobblestoned streets -- these are the fairy-tale images of Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania, known collectively as the Baltic States. Since gaining independence in 1991, these northeastern European neighbors, occupied by the Germans during World War II and later forcibly annexed to the Soviet Union, have been bidding to become big-time travel destinations. The capitals -- Tallinn (Estonia), Riga (Latvia) and Vilnius (Lithuania)
TRAVEL
By BEVERLY BEYETTE and BEVERLY BEYETTE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2006
VILNIUS, LITHUANIA -- The turrets, the ancient city gates and the cobblestoned streets -- these are the fairy-tale images of Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania, known collectively as the Baltic States. Since gaining independence in 1991, these northeastern European neighbors, occupied by the Germans during World War II and later forcibly annexed to the Soviet Union, have been bidding to become big-time travel destinations. The capitals -- Tallinn (Estonia), Riga (Latvia) and Vilnius (Lithuania)
NEWS
By Katka Krosnar and Katka Krosnar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2004
VILNIUS, Lithuania - A small memorial plaque in a quiet residential courtyard in the heart of Vilnius is the only hint of the rich Jewish life that once revolved around this neighborhood in a city formerly dubbed "the Jerusalem of the North." But it is here, in the Old Town of the Lithuanian capital, that work is about to begin on a highly ambitious and controversial multimillion-dollar project to rebuild Vilnius's lost Jewish quarter. Before World War II, the Baltic city was a European center of Yiddish learning and home to a thriving Jewish community that made up 40 percent of its population.
FEATURES
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 6, 2000
VILNIUS, Lithuania - The curtain rises on a "Macbeth" with much of the dialogue and half the characters thrown out, and it was already Shakespeare's shortest play. No matter. The curtain doesn't fall again for another four hours. It's the spaces between the words that count when director Eimontas Nekrosius puts on a play - and there are plenty of them. Once, when he was a young man and his foes were Soviet censors, his audiences could fill those spaces with sharp and revelatory political meanings.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | October 12, 1997
VILNIUS, Lithuania -- At a used car lot in central Vilnius, rows of Mercedes and Audis and other cars shimmered in the hazy sun under a dingy array of torn pennants as a dealer wooed a prospective buyer."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | October 27, 1992
MOSCOW -- Lithuanians turned their backs yesterday on the political movement that steered the country to independence and voted heavily in favor of the former Communist Party slate in elections to parliament.Results that came in yesterday from Sunday's vote showed the former Communists running well ahead of the candidates from the Sajudis movement of President Vytautus Landsbergis. They could, in the end, control the government outright.The Communists -- now renamed the Democratic Labor Party -- apparently capitalized on discontent over poor handling of the economy and the government's increasing rigidity and inability to compromise with other political forces in the country.
SPORTS
By Phil Hersh and Phil Hersh,Chicago Tribune | May 17, 1992
Tom Pukstys was on the phone from his apartment in Gainesville, Fla. Pukstys was talking about his friend and guest, discus thrower Romas Ubartas, and translating questions and answers into Lithuanian so Ubartas could do a makeshift interview."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Staff writer | February 23, 1992
VILNIUS, Lithuania -- The killing started even before the Nazis arrived, and it redoubled under German guidance.By the end of 1942, more than 200,000 Lithuanian Jews were dead -- killed not in concentration camps but in the cities and villages where they lived, shot down by their neighbors.Lithuania's Jewish population has gone from 250,000 in 1938 to 5,500 today. In 1938, Vilnius was one of the most important centers of Jewish culture and scholarship in the world. It had 60 synagogues. Today it has one.In Vilnius, the past has not been sorted out.Were all the young men wearing the black uniforms of the Lithuanian Battalions criminals?
NEWS
By Katka Krosnar and Katka Krosnar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2004
VILNIUS, Lithuania - A small memorial plaque in a quiet residential courtyard in the heart of Vilnius is the only hint of the rich Jewish life that once revolved around this neighborhood in a city formerly dubbed "the Jerusalem of the North." But it is here, in the Old Town of the Lithuanian capital, that work is about to begin on a highly ambitious and controversial multimillion-dollar project to rebuild Vilnius's lost Jewish quarter. Before World War II, the Baltic city was a European center of Yiddish learning and home to a thriving Jewish community that made up 40 percent of its population.
NEWS
By Zofia Smardz | May 10, 1992
BEGINNING WITH MY STREETS.Czeslaw Milosz.Farrar, Straus & Giroux.288 pages. $30. In the preface to this collection of reminiscences and essays, Nobel Prize-winning poet Czeslaw Milosz reflects on the choice that confronted him when he found himself an immigrant in America: "Either to leave behind what existed only in my memory and to find in what surrounded me material for my reflection or, without renouncing the present, to try to bring back the streets, landscapes,...
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Staff writer | February 23, 1992
VILNIUS, Lithuania -- The killing started even before the Nazis arrived, and it redoubled under German guidance.By the end of 1942, more than 200,000 Lithuanian Jews were dead -- killed not in concentration camps but in the cities and villages where they lived, shot down by their neighbors.Lithuania's Jewish population has gone from 250,000 in 1938 to 5,500 today. In 1938, Vilnius was one of the most important centers of Jewish culture and scholarship in the world. It had 60 synagogues. Today it has one.In Vilnius, the past has not been sorted out.Were all the young men wearing the black uniforms of the Lithuanian Battalions criminals?
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