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NEWS
August 10, 2011
Like Garrison Keillor, whose column used to appear in The Sun, Dan Rodricks underestimates the power of the tea party in American politics ("Question for tea party: What now?" Aug. 4). He should have read John Malagrin's letter right across the fold ("Tea party congressmen are the last great hope," Aug. 4). The tea party isn't Republican or Democrat, but the embodiment of the American peoples' frustration with the current direction our country is heading and the continued growth of government.
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NEWS
November 10, 2013
In all levels of all programs and institutions, public or private, big or small, government or corporate, there is some degree of fraud or mismanagement ("Food stamp fraud is real and must be stopped," Nov. 6). There is no way to have a program like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (better known as food stamps) that will not have some degree of misuse, or even outright fraud. The federal government spent around $80 billion on food stamps in 2013. If it was even granted that 5 percent of that $80 billion was misused, that would mean there was $4 billion worth of federally subsidized misuse or outright fraud.
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NEWS
June 11, 2012
Sorry, Dan Rodricks , but I feel no sympathy whatsoever for your so-called "victim," Francesco Grasso, who state police say was observed to be driving like a nut endangering others. Should the retired officer have gotten out of his car? No. But maybe the good doctor will start driving more cautiously and not endanger the lives of others and turning them into victims of his own carelessness and reckless driving. He is only a victim of his own actions. John Sinclair
NEWS
October 7, 2013
Dan Shannahan's letter ("Federal workers shouldn't complain about shutdown," Oct. 2) was as ignorant as it was callous. Writing that federal workers receive Flag Day as a holiday is blatantly incorrect and The Sun should not be publishing such a falsehood. At least he didn't mention Halloween. Yet I'm curious to know what he means by "all the federal holidays they enjoy that the civilian work force doesn't get. " Is he referring to New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, etc.?
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 5, 2007
The men who've made the movie version of Susan Cooper's fantasy novel about Light vs. Dark, The Dark is Rising, have tinkered with everything in the book, altering the nationality, age and family of the young immortal hero, as well as adding a potential Judas character and gaudy magical transformations. So why didn't the makers of The Seeker: The Dark is Rising go all the way and change the villain - the Dark's main man - from a fearsome horseman known as the Rider to something we haven't seen before?
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2003
So Charles Taylor sings his version of "Don't Cry for Me, Monrovia," waving goodbye to Liberia and flying off into the Nigerian sunset. All is supposed to be fine now. The people greet peacekeepers enthusiastically. The rebels reopen the port. The villain is gone and the heroes can take over. That scenario sells movies, books and foreign policies. Get the bad guy. There always seems to be one handy. Saddam Hussein currently fills that role. Osama bin Laden can be trotted out whenever necessary.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | October 13, 1992
Hero or villain? Discoverer or exploiter? Or was Christopher Columbus just a normal guy?Yesterday a group of students from Broadneck High School debated just where to place the alleged founder of the Americas in this time of political correctness."
FEATURES
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 27, 2004
It's 4 on a rainy morning at the All-American Diner on a deserted road outside Gallup, N.M. A bald, paunchy, amiable-looking restaurant supplies salesman (Kevin Chamberlin) is seated by a window, having a cup of coffee and reading a fishing magazine. He is jolted by the sudden appearance of an intense, sinister stranger (Ben Kingsley), who sits down opposite him and thrusts at him a clutch of drawings of mutilated corpses. Soon the salesman is rushing off to his car - but the stranger is already sitting in his back seat.
FEATURES
By Sean Patrick Norris and Sean Patrick Norris,Sun Reporter | August 31, 2007
In the original Halloween, Donald Pleasence played the antihero Dr. Loomis as an eccentric, but one who ultimately proves himself good, rescuing hunted baby sitter Laurie Strode from a psychopathic Michael Myers. Leave it to bloodthirsty director Rob Zombie and actor Malcolm McDowell who specializes in villainous characters to craft the ambitious doctor as much less of a white knight in the "reimagined" Halloween, opening today. "It's a very different storyline. We are reinventing the characters," says McDowell, who appeared this month at Horrorfind Weekend at the Hunt Valley Marriott.
NEWS
By James M. Kramon | November 30, 1997
WE HAVE become a country of villains and victims and, the evidence shows, we like it that way.Television and other media are consumed with plots involving perpetrators and their prey. People who have harbored or forgotten grievances for decades are suddenly recalling childhood abuses by parents and others. Employees of businesses, patrons of restaurants, customers of stores and people who come into contact with government authority are decrying the harsh and lawless treatment they claim they have received.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
When the Orioles were sold 20 years ago today for $173 million at a bankruptcy auction in New York City, the sense was that the cavalry had come to rescue its community treasure. Leading the charge of well-heeled Maryland investors was Baltimore attorney and self-made billionaire Peter G. Angelos - the champion of the little guy who was going to make sure interlopers wouldn't take off in the dark of night with the storied franchise, the way Robert Irsay had done with the beloved Colts years before.
NEWS
July 1, 2013
The real headline on the article regarding Carnival Cruise Lines' decision to leave Baltimore ("Carnival has plans to ship out of port," June 28) should have been: "EPA will cost Maryland and Baltimore jobs. " This is just the beginning for the loss of jobs the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is going to cause. The talk is over. I wonder if the families of the people who will be laid off by Carnival leaving the port will still be believers in climate change. It all sounds good until it hits you in the pocketbook.
NEWS
By David Horsey | August 6, 2012
Are two of the left's most useful villains, Charles and David Koch, not quite as unredeemable as liberals believe? Could it be they might change their minds about climate change and admit that it is real? Richard A. Muller, a physics professor at University of California-Berkeley, says that, after years of paying for studies by global warming skeptics, the Koch brothers honestly want to get the science clarified. They helped fund Mr. Muller, who only three years ago doubted that the Earth was heating up to dangerous levels due to human activity.
NEWS
June 17, 2012
I am glad that Occupy Baltimore is focusing on the foreclosure problem ("Occupy turns to housing," June 13), but blaming "those who amassed fortunes by speculating on collateralized mortgage payments" is off the mark. There is plenty of blame to go around, starting with the homeowners who treated their houses as ATM machines and refinanced several times over in a rising market only to find themselves underwater when the housing bubble burst. What about the real estate speculators who flew in on the red-eye from California to buy slum properties in Baltimore, figuring they could sell them later at a profit?
NEWS
June 11, 2012
Sorry, Dan Rodricks , but I feel no sympathy whatsoever for your so-called "victim," Francesco Grasso, who state police say was observed to be driving like a nut endangering others. Should the retired officer have gotten out of his car? No. But maybe the good doctor will start driving more cautiously and not endanger the lives of others and turning them into victims of his own carelessness and reckless driving. He is only a victim of his own actions. John Sinclair
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts | March 19, 2012
TOM BERGERON!  It's so great to see you again! Oh, hi, Brooke, you're there too. Introductions: Notable for Gavin's fedora, Maks' open shirt and Martina looking more glam than I could have ever imagined.  And now they tell us no elimination this week, everybody will be back next week. Way to kill some suspense there. Maria Menounos & Derek Hough Derek: "I want as many mirrorball trophies as I have chest hairs.  That would be four. "  Maria's got tomboy tendencies and a laugh you'll find either endearing or INCREDIBLY irritating.
FEATURES
By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 8, 2004
The name Alfred Molina isn't exactly synonymous with charisma. For three decades - in productions that range from the elegant Enchanted April to the bombastic Boogie Nights - the 51-year-old British actor has earned a reputation for performances that are inventive, intelligent and sometimes larger-than-life. But charisma? Not so much. "I belong to a very honorable tradition, and I'm very proud of it," said Molina. "The character actor tradition." That's why some movie mavens were puzzled by his being cast as Doctor Octopus in Spider-Man 2, which opened last week.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1997
John Glover is tired of being a villain, but that isn't why he'll be on view at the Senator Theatre tonight as a genial benefactor.The Tony Award-winning actor won't be playing a part this time. He is a genial benefactor, and he'll be playing host to a screening of his film "Love! Valour! Compassion!" to help his alma mater, Towson State University, raise money for a scholarship fund in his name.Glover was one of the first students in Towson's theater arts program. He graduated in 1966, boarded a bus for New York and has been in theater, film and television ever since.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | February 13, 2012
Hines Ward may be gone, but he won't soon be forgotten by Ravens fans. Now that the Pittsburgh Steelers have parted ways with the wide receiver and his maddening, ever-present smile, here's a look at some other famous Baltimore sports villains.  Robert Irsay -- Erratic owner who moved the beloved Baltimore Colts to Indianapolis under cover of darkness in March, 1984, breaking a city's heart. Paul Tagliabue -- Cold-hearted NFL commissioner who bluntly suggested, in the wake of the Colts leaving town, that Baltimore should have built a museum rather than pine for a new pro football team.
NEWS
November 25, 2011
It is about time that people become aware about how secrets hidden by animal agriculture detrimentally affect us all. Animal waste disposal from farms supplying animals for slaughter to large meat factories such as Perdue is not inspected responsibly. At the same time, when the farming operations of their suppliers is questioned, the big company leaves the small farmers alone to fend for themselves. It is appalling how large agribusinesses protect their operations from being open to the public and are allowed to inspect and regulate themselves.
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