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NEWS
April 5, 2013
The Village to Village Network, a national organization that helps coordinate senior villages, defines villages as "membership-driven, grass-roots organizations that, through both volunteers and paid staff, coordinate access to affordable services including transportation, health and wellness programs, home repairs, social and educational activities, and other day-to-day needs enabling individuals to remain connected to their community throughout the...
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By Donna Owens and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
More than 150 years ago, famed philosopher Henry David Thoreau published his iconic book “Walden,” which chronicled his two years living as one with nature in a cabin set on Walden Pond in Massachusetts. Today, some travelers who seek a Walden-esque experience still want 21st-century amenities and perks. At Blue Moon Rising, a new eco-friendly vacation village nestled in the mountains of Western Maryland, they'll find the best of both worlds. Following a soft opening in fall 2013, the retreat officially opened to guests June 27. Tucked away on 15 wooded acres replete with towering oak, hickory and hemlock trees, various flora, fauna and a quiet stream, the property boasts 14 environmentally conscious, compact and energy-efficient cabins (ranging from 300 to 450 square feet)
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NEWS
September 19, 2013
I have been a resident of Columbia since 1976 and always enjoyed the area. I currently reside in Long Reach (since 1991). It was always taken care as all the other villages. I have noticed a steady decline in the upkeep. Trash is strewn everywhere, sidewalks are broken and fallen trees are left to their demise. It is difficult to walk without running into low-hanging tree branches or poison ivy hovering over head. It is really sad to see the area look so downtrodden. It would be nice if some of the Columbia Association funds that we pay could go to take care of some of these issues.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Octavia Dugan, who founded a Village of Cross Keys boutique and was considered an arbiter of traditional fashion, died in her sleep of undetermined causes Saturday at Palm City Nursing Home in Palm City, Fla. The former Cromwell Valley resident was 98. Born Octavia Whelan Chatard in Baltimore and raised on Calvert Street, she was the daughter of Dr. J. Albert Chatard, a physician, and Alice Whelan, a homemaker. She attended the Baltimore Academy of the Visitation and Notre Dame Preparatory School, where she graduated in 1934.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Tucker and Ken Tucker,Special to the Sun | October 24, 2004
Villages, by John Updike. Knopf. 321 pages. $25. John Updike's new, elegiac yet erotic Villages is a portrait of a family man and "a life of bourgeois repose," as the wry omniscient narrator puts it, told over decades. It's the story of Owen Mackenzie, a married-with-children software programmer whose various East Coast places of residence (including Pennsylvania and Massachusetts) are typified by his years in the smallish town of Middle Falls, Conn. Everything about Owen -- from his nuclear family to his two marriages to his well-paying but nondescript job to his just-average places of residence (no "Great" Falls for this character or his creator)
NEWS
February 27, 1998
STARNER'S DAM. Melrose. Smallwood. Know where they are in Carroll County? If the county commissioners approve, these places would soon achieve the status of official "rural villages."The county Planning and Zoning Commission has approved listings of 35 such places -- many you've never heard of -- for designation as villages with defined geographic boundaries.With eight established municipalities, Carroll is the leader in the region in incorporated towns. Now the list would grow to nearly blanket the county with villages.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | June 3, 1995
PINTO -- For hundreds of years Indians returned to the broad, rich bottom lands along the Potomac River. They built their homes and planted their corn, beans and squash in the deep soil deposited by the river.With the arrival of Europeans in the 17th century, the native people traded for a time, acquiring glass beads and metal arrow points. Then they vanished, leaving only their trash and the faintest traces of their towns beneath the river silts.Hundreds of artifacts and clues to the lives of these earliest of Maryland's inhabitants came to light in 11 days of archaeology that ended this week at the old Indian village sites southwest of Cresaptown.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 17, 1993
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- U.N. peacekeeping forces withdrew from three villages in southern Lebanon yesterday and handed their positions over to the regular Lebanese army as tension grew in the area between Muslim fundamentalist guerrillas and Israeli troops.The U.N. flag was taken down as the Ghanaian battalion of the U.N. Interim Force in Lebanon pulled out from Maarakeh, Janata and Yanouh. Four hundred Lebanese soldiers backed by armored personnel carriers moved into the three villages and hoisted the Lebanese flag.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 14, 1992
MOSCOW -- Azerbaijani militias, reportedly backed by attack aircraft and scores of tanks, pushed into the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh yesterday in a strong offensive that prompted Armenia to threaten direct intervention in the 4-year-old war.The Azerbaijanis, who had lost their last foothold in Nagorno-Karabakh last month, took at least five villages in tough fighting believed to have left dozens dead, reports from the region said. But Azerbaijani officials played down the offensive, saying that the captured villages had been taken and retaken several times before, and that it was hard to tell anymore who were attackers and who defenders.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | March 10, 1997
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- As America's cities get ready for the 21st century, Weiming Lu would like to see them building and perfecting ''urban villages'' that embody the best we've learned through the urban tribulations of the 20th.Mr. Lu's millennial villages would have a mix of tastefully recycled historic buildings and artfully designed new ones. People would flock to them for their varieties of age and ethnic groups, offices, homes and jobs, urban parks, street art and entertainment.The villages would be both arts districts and ''cyber-villages,'' attracting companies focused on the Internet, new media and telecommunications industries.
NEWS
August 13, 2014
The story is told that in 1787, fake villages were erected along the Dneiper River so that Czarina Catherine and her elite guests would not see the deplorable state in which the peasants of her country lived. Well dressed serfs waved happily from the shore as Catherine's barge floated past, only to be stripped of their clothing and returned to crushing poverty after their ruler had floated by. Whether true or myth, such false facades now bear the name of Catherine's favorite General who orchestrated the plot; "Potemkin Villages" have come to symbolize a cynical effort to hide the truth and present a picture of prosperity where none exists.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | July 9, 2014
The developers of a new retirement community in Ellicott City are to break ground Thursday, nearly 10 years after their organization was given the land for the site. The Lutheran Village at Miller's Grant could house 400 people upon completion, expected in 2015. The $140 million development takes its name from the family of Charles E. Miller and his son Paul, which gave the Frederick Road land in 2005 to Carroll Lutheran Village, a Westminster-based organization that started a retirement community in 1977 and today serves about 700 people in 400 homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
A late-night cookie store will open in Charles Village in late July. The store will be open every day until 3 a.m. Insomnia Cookies, a Bryn  Mawr , Penn.-based bakery and dessert cafe that delivers warm cookies to the customer's door until the wee hours of the morning, will open its first Maryland location in the Charles Commons building at 3301 N. Charles St.  It sounds like the kind of idea that was hatched in an undergraduate dormitory,...
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
In a cabin built in the 1750s, just a few hundred feet from a 201-year-old stone bridge across the quiet Casselman River, a man sits at a slab of a wooden table, an array of carving tools spread before him. The rush of traffic from nearby Alternate U.S. 40, also known as Route 40, does not bother Gary Yoder. Nor does the "thump-thump-thump" of the weaving loom from the cabin next door. The most celebrated crafter of wooden bird sculptures in Western Maryland is too engrossed to notice.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
City officials promised to cover the financial costs to the Charles Village residents displaced by the collapse of East 26th Street, and that tab now sits just shy of $100,000, city officials said Thursday. It will continue to grow, as well, even though the residents are back in their homes. The costs — mostly for hotel rooms for the residents of the 19 homes that were evacuated — are in addition to the city's $18.5 million estimate for the street's reconstruction, said Caron Brace, a spokeswoman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, whose office released the figures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
In recent years, British cooking has gotten experimental and interesting, escaping from its role as the punch line of every culinary joke. Still, the chef who embraces traditional British foods outside of the United Kingdom is taking a risk. The Brits definitely know how to do some things right in the kitchen, though, and Baltimore is fortunate that Neill Howell - a native of Britain and the former Bond Street Social executive chef - is sharing a few of those successes with the city.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | May 26, 2002
AT DULLES International Airport, travelers surrender cuticle scissors as if they could morph into box-cutters. One pair had been in the bearer's family for 75 years, an heirloom handed down from mother to daughter. Oh, well. On the other side of the Atlantic, the vacationer slides through train tunnels piercing the Appenines to Genoa, where the Italian government feared terrorists might try to kill President Bush and other world leaders with an airplane morphed into a missile. A day later, on a hill above the Italian Riviera, a muscular, blue construction truck roars past hikers on a hill above Portofino, an American flag hanging in the cab. At home or away, Sept.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1999
Representatives from Columbia's villages again clashed with members of the Columbia Council last night in the ongoing battle over proposed changes to the way the villages do business.Speaking on behalf of all 10 village managers, Anne Dodd, manager of Kings Contrivance, criticized Columbia Association officials at a sparsely attended meeting of the council's task force on CA-village relations.Said Dodd: "The secretiveness and the disregard for a mutually agreed upon process can only further weaken, rather than enhance, the relationship between the villages and the Columbia Council."
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
City officials promised a doubling of security on the collapsed block of East 26th Street in Charles Village on Monday after two of its 19 evacuated homes were reported broken into. One homeowner reported $250 worth of damage to a window frame after he noticed his second-story air conditioning unit had been forced into the home, according to a police report. Residents of another home reported missing nearly $1,200 in cash and other personal items - including shoes, jewelry and a laptop computer - after it was determined there had been a break-in there as well.
NEWS
May 6, 2014
I along with thousands of others wish to reach out to the residents who homes and belongings were devastated as a result of the horrible landslide along 26th Street in Charles Village ( "Deluge causes landslide in Charles Village, floods roadways across state," May 1). The reports indicate that the occupants in this area had been complaining for years over the weakening of this retaining wall. Unfortunately, to prove the residents' point it finally took a loud blast from Mother Nature that included more than seven inches of rain over a two-day period that literally destroyed the foundation of the whole area.
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