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By Scott Eyman and Scott Eyman,Cox News Service | January 4, 1993
Gary Giddins is more than good, but not great, not yet."Faces in the Crowd" is a collection of Mr. Giddins' critical articles, mostly from the Village Voice, where he's been ensconced for years.He's stronger on writing and music -- he may be the best jazz critic in the country -- than he is on film; his report on Clint Eastwood's "Bird" is ingenuously condescending, as if he had to pinch himself that Dirty Harry had the brains, not just to appreciate Charlie Parker, but to make a film of integrity about him. Like, wow!
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By Dave Rosenthal | June 21, 2012
In an otherwise uplifting New York Times story about the enduring love of books in France -- and the government regulations that foster independent stores -- was some sad news. The charming Village Voice Bookshop is closing. I stumbled across the Left Bank shop a few years ago while visiting my daughter in Paris. I was looking for English-lanuage translations of popular novels, and they recommended "Have Mercy on Us All" by Fred Vargas as well as " The Interrogation" by  J. M. G. Le Clezio.
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By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1996
NEW YORK -- Tuesday night at Astor Place and out of the roiling, end-of-the-workday crowd a young woman snatches the latest copy of the Village Voice from a pallet dropped off in front of the local Starbucks.The hand belongs to Deanna Leiphart, a slightly harried, 30-year-old blonde, once of Baltimore but now desperately seeking a New York apartment."They have the best list of apartments," she says of the Voice.Everybody knows that. You want night life, you want to know where the bands are playing, you want to find a cubbyhole to call your own, you turn to the Voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
Liz Phair is a sellout. And a copycat, and a Sheryl Crow and an Avril Lavigne, but most of all, a former hero. So says the naggy, invisible Greek chorus of former and current fans, purists, naysayers, and kneejerk critics who greet every record she's put out since "Exile in Guyville," her seminal 1993 album. The reaction was just as strong when she released "Funstyle" last year, an album that — after she described it as "experimental" — was practically begging to be torn to shreds by critics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Benjamin and Elizabeth Benjamin,ALBANY TIMES UNION | January 3, 1999
It took a lot of chutzpah for Stan Mack to do what he has done.To attempt to consolidate 4,000 years of Jewish history - from Abraham's first discussion with God in the desert to today's turmoil over peace in the Middle East - into a 265-page book and, of all things, in cartoons.But that is exactly what Mack, a 62-year-old New York City illustrator, set out to do in his new book, ``The Story of the Jews: A 4,000-Year Adventure.''``I concluded that there was room for a popular overview of Jewish history that put everything into perspective,'' said Mack.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett | February 16, 1994
James Cameron began writing his book 63 years ago, right after the lynching he survived.But no one was interested. In 1982, he mortgaged his home to publish it himself. For a self-published book, it didn't do too badly."We sold 1,100 copies here in Milwaukee," he says.This year, Black Classic Press decided to reissue the book."The Cameron book is definitely the type of book we like to do," says W. Paul Coates, director of the Baltimore company."It had been rejected by almost every publisher in the country.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler | September 17, 1995
The Selkes never tire of hubcapsThe shiny hubcaps hung on the fence at Hubcap City on U.S. 1 gleam and glitter like shields of the fallen in a Valhalla of road warriors.Those hubcaps bouncing off potholes into infinity actually have a good chance of ending up at Hubcap City spots around town. In fact, the hubcap you buy may be your own.In the ancient remains of one of the first gas stations on U.S. 1, thousands of hubcaps are strewn, strung, stacked and racked like artifacts at an archaeological dig, shards of the automotive age."
NEWS
November 18, 1996
Alma Kitchell, 103, a pioneering broadcast personality who starred in the first commercial network television series -- a cooking show -- died Wednesday at her home in Sarasota, Fla.She began her career in 1927, on NBC's old New York radio station, WJZ. Known as the Golden Voice of the Golden Age of radio, she became host of a series of shows devoted to women's concerns. Her program is regarded as one of the first radio talk shows.In 1947, Miss Kitchell abandoned her radio career and made television history as the star of "In the Kelvinator Kitchen."
NEWS
November 2, 1997
One more reason for U.S. to pull out of U.N.As the morally bankrupt and corrupt hierarchy in the United Nations continues to demand largess from our wimpish government, reports of new atrocities committed by U.N. mercenaries continue to surface.The mainstream media, on the whole always ready to attack militias and Second Amendment advocates, has remained silent and has censored the politically incorrect subject of U.N. evils.Village Voice reporter Jennifer Gould published reports of U.N. Belgian "Peace Keepers" engaging in atrocities in Somalia, where Belgian soldiers were caught holding a Somali child over an open flame.
NEWS
By Sydney H. Schanberg | July 11, 1991
WE HAVE partied and we have paraded, but as all can see, we have not put an end to the Iraq war and the "vanquished" Saddam Hussein. The Iraqi tyrant, still in power, taunts his so-called conquerors by refusing to turn over his nuclear weapons-making equipment. And thus the nagging feeling begins to spread sourly in Washington that, after all the celebrations and euphoria, the United States and its allies will have to go back in and do something to eliminate this man (whose rise to power had been assisted by the very same United States and its allies)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Benjamin and Elizabeth Benjamin,ALBANY TIMES UNION | January 3, 1999
It took a lot of chutzpah for Stan Mack to do what he has done.To attempt to consolidate 4,000 years of Jewish history - from Abraham's first discussion with God in the desert to today's turmoil over peace in the Middle East - into a 265-page book and, of all things, in cartoons.But that is exactly what Mack, a 62-year-old New York City illustrator, set out to do in his new book, ``The Story of the Jews: A 4,000-Year Adventure.''``I concluded that there was room for a popular overview of Jewish history that put everything into perspective,'' said Mack.
NEWS
November 2, 1997
One more reason for U.S. to pull out of U.N.As the morally bankrupt and corrupt hierarchy in the United Nations continues to demand largess from our wimpish government, reports of new atrocities committed by U.N. mercenaries continue to surface.The mainstream media, on the whole always ready to attack militias and Second Amendment advocates, has remained silent and has censored the politically incorrect subject of U.N. evils.Village Voice reporter Jennifer Gould published reports of U.N. Belgian "Peace Keepers" engaging in atrocities in Somalia, where Belgian soldiers were caught holding a Somali child over an open flame.
NEWS
November 18, 1996
Alma Kitchell, 103, a pioneering broadcast personality who starred in the first commercial network television series -- a cooking show -- died Wednesday at her home in Sarasota, Fla.She began her career in 1927, on NBC's old New York radio station, WJZ. Known as the Golden Voice of the Golden Age of radio, she became host of a series of shows devoted to women's concerns. Her program is regarded as one of the first radio talk shows.In 1947, Miss Kitchell abandoned her radio career and made television history as the star of "In the Kelvinator Kitchen."
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1996
NEW YORK -- Tuesday night at Astor Place and out of the roiling, end-of-the-workday crowd a young woman snatches the latest copy of the Village Voice from a pallet dropped off in front of the local Starbucks.The hand belongs to Deanna Leiphart, a slightly harried, 30-year-old blonde, once of Baltimore but now desperately seeking a New York apartment."They have the best list of apartments," she says of the Voice.Everybody knows that. You want night life, you want to know where the bands are playing, you want to find a cubbyhole to call your own, you turn to the Voice.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler | September 17, 1995
The Selkes never tire of hubcapsThe shiny hubcaps hung on the fence at Hubcap City on U.S. 1 gleam and glitter like shields of the fallen in a Valhalla of road warriors.Those hubcaps bouncing off potholes into infinity actually have a good chance of ending up at Hubcap City spots around town. In fact, the hubcap you buy may be your own.In the ancient remains of one of the first gas stations on U.S. 1, thousands of hubcaps are strewn, strung, stacked and racked like artifacts at an archaeological dig, shards of the automotive age."
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett | February 16, 1994
James Cameron began writing his book 63 years ago, right after the lynching he survived.But no one was interested. In 1982, he mortgaged his home to publish it himself. For a self-published book, it didn't do too badly."We sold 1,100 copies here in Milwaukee," he says.This year, Black Classic Press decided to reissue the book."The Cameron book is definitely the type of book we like to do," says W. Paul Coates, director of the Baltimore company."It had been rejected by almost every publisher in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
Liz Phair is a sellout. And a copycat, and a Sheryl Crow and an Avril Lavigne, but most of all, a former hero. So says the naggy, invisible Greek chorus of former and current fans, purists, naysayers, and kneejerk critics who greet every record she's put out since "Exile in Guyville," her seminal 1993 album. The reaction was just as strong when she released "Funstyle" last year, an album that — after she described it as "experimental" — was practically begging to be torn to shreds by critics.
FEATURES
By Bob Allen | August 4, 1991
Country-rocker Kelly Willis knows listeners are startled by her singing voice when they first hear it.Ever since the diminutive blonde began performing publicly at age 16, in a band called Kelly & the Fireballs, the Annandale, Va., native has been hearing comments like, "I can't believe such a great big voice is coming out of such a little girl!"And that big voice will boom this Saturday at the Fair Hill Country/Bluegrass Music Festival in Cecil County. Ms. Willis and her band, Radio Ranch, are part of a daylong lineup that includes the Judds, Ricky Van Shelton, Mary-Chapin Carpenter, Shelby Lynne, the Dillards and Russ Barenberg/Jerry Douglas/Edgar Meyer.
FEATURES
By Scott Eyman and Scott Eyman,Cox News Service | January 4, 1993
Gary Giddins is more than good, but not great, not yet."Faces in the Crowd" is a collection of Mr. Giddins' critical articles, mostly from the Village Voice, where he's been ensconced for years.He's stronger on writing and music -- he may be the best jazz critic in the country -- than he is on film; his report on Clint Eastwood's "Bird" is ingenuously condescending, as if he had to pinch himself that Dirty Harry had the brains, not just to appreciate Charlie Parker, but to make a film of integrity about him. Like, wow!
FEATURES
By Bob Allen | August 4, 1991
Country-rocker Kelly Willis knows listeners are startled by her singing voice when they first hear it.Ever since the diminutive blonde began performing publicly at age 16, in a band called Kelly & the Fireballs, the Annandale, Va., native has been hearing comments like, "I can't believe such a great big voice is coming out of such a little girl!"And that big voice will boom this Saturday at the Fair Hill Country/Bluegrass Music Festival in Cecil County. Ms. Willis and her band, Radio Ranch, are part of a daylong lineup that includes the Judds, Ricky Van Shelton, Mary-Chapin Carpenter, Shelby Lynne, the Dillards and Russ Barenberg/Jerry Douglas/Edgar Meyer.
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