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NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | January 6, 2010
T he cruise ships sail from Tampa and Fort Lauderdale and Miami, great ocean-going pueblos, 10 decks high, passengers lounging on their verandas, gazing at the sea, workhorse Americans trying to get out of cell-phone range for a week and sweeten up to their families. It is a beautiful thing to behold. You walk around the ship as Florida slips past in the gloaming and smell hamburgers frying and hear the rhythm of mojitos being shaken and the clik-clok of the ping-pong tables and pick out the accents of New Jersey, Canada, Atlanta, Little Havana, Iowa, people who have left their lives behind and formed a village of 1,200 souls joined by a solemn compact to try to have fun. Vacation cruises are advertised as luxurious journeys to exotic places, but a chief pleasure is the reading of books and another is making small talk with strangers.
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NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | January 6, 2010
T he cruise ships sail from Tampa and Fort Lauderdale and Miami, great ocean-going pueblos, 10 decks high, passengers lounging on their verandas, gazing at the sea, workhorse Americans trying to get out of cell-phone range for a week and sweeten up to their families. It is a beautiful thing to behold. You walk around the ship as Florida slips past in the gloaming and smell hamburgers frying and hear the rhythm of mojitos being shaken and the clik-clok of the ping-pong tables and pick out the accents of New Jersey, Canada, Atlanta, Little Havana, Iowa, people who have left their lives behind and formed a village of 1,200 souls joined by a solemn compact to try to have fun. Vacation cruises are advertised as luxurious journeys to exotic places, but a chief pleasure is the reading of books and another is making small talk with strangers.
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NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 17, 2002
A Howard County nonprofit organization is poised to provide insight and advice on the events of Sept. 11 -- information that may affect how government and private organizations nationwide respond to acts of terrorism. The Jessup-based Village Life Co. has been commissioned to conduct a research study on the response of faith-based relief organizations to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Based on the study results, Village Life will recommend changes that could improve the effectiveness of relief groups.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,sun reporter | February 20, 2008
Talking and "laying their cards on the table" is the best way for Wilde Lake Village Board members and residents to work with developers as plans for downtown Columbia take shape, a General Growth executive told them this week. But as the board and homeowners thanked Gregory F. Hamm, General Growth's regional vice president and general manager of Columbia, for attending their meeting, they didn't mince words when they questioned the village's place in downtown development plans. "One of the strengths of the villages is that they have lives of their own," said Mary Pivar, a village board member.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 24, 2001
PALAGINO, Russia - As the days turn warmer, the meadows here in central Russia are green and busy, full of people and cows, each person holding his cow by a rope as if walking a much-beloved pet. Nearly every villager has a cow, kept all winter in a shed attached to the house, and when the cows go outside for the first time in spring, they are easily frightened and likely to run off in panic. They need a steady, comforting hand until they grow accustomed once more to the long days of sunshine and freedom.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | April 2, 1993
London. -- In Latin America, Africa and even in parts of Asia families are breaking up. Under the stresses of urban, capitalist life both the old extended family and the more modern nuclear family are falling apart. In their place is the ''spaghetti family'' with loose strands that link parts of the family but never the whole. It is an ominous and dangerous development.For years as I've traveled from Brazil to Morocco to India I have written occasional columns about street children and child laborers.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | January 10, 1993
In the late 1700s, a busy grain milling and textile center thrived in Howard County. Today, the remnants of its buildings and even its trash dump are providing valuable clues to 18th-century village life."
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,sun reporter | February 20, 2008
Talking and "laying their cards on the table" is the best way for Wilde Lake Village Board members and residents to work with developers as plans for downtown Columbia take shape, a General Growth executive told them this week. But as the board and homeowners thanked Gregory F. Hamm, General Growth's regional vice president and general manager of Columbia, for attending their meeting, they didn't mince words when they questioned the village's place in downtown development plans. "One of the strengths of the villages is that they have lives of their own," said Mary Pivar, a village board member.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 12, 1991
'Black Rain'When: April 14, 7 p.m.Where: Baltimore Museum of Art, Art Museum Drive.Tickets: $6; $5 for Film Forum and BMA members.Call: 889-1993 for information on these and other screenings. Shohei Imamura's "Black Rain," which shows Sunday night at the Baltimore Film Festival, is a haiku from hell. Delicate, almost ethereal, the movie is also one of the most searing ever made. It's an account on a single instant and how it colored and evenstually destroyed the lives of the few who survived it. The moment can be fixed in time -- 8:14 a.m., Aug. 6, 1945.
FEATURES
By Susan LaRocco and Susan LaRocco,Contributing Writer | August 2, 1992
When the tidal current began to run upriver, we raised our anchor from the muddy bottom of the River Gambia and began a voyage back in time to a world we had never experienced.We had arrived in Gambia, a country smaller than Connecticut, on the hump of West Africa, after almost two years of continuous travel on our 42-foot sailboat, Cygnus. It had weathered North Atlantic storms, carried us up the Seine to Paris, anchored off the little Irish fishing village, where my husband, Ed Quigley, was raised, and survived a knockdown near Lisbon.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest and Nancy Jones Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2004
Traveling along the Route 30 corridor between Hampstead and Reisterstown, many people fail to notice the tiny villages that dot the road. Some sit along Hanover Pike, others are tucked just out of sight from passers-by. Regardless, the villages of Woodensburg, Boring, Arcadia and Fowblesburg have remained somewhat untouched by the growing number of commuters and tractor-trailers that seem to inhabit the busy thoroughfare. Beyond Hanover Pike, bucolic roads lead to large farms and historic homes mixed in with newer homes on large lots.
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 17, 2002
A Howard County nonprofit organization is poised to provide insight and advice on the events of Sept. 11 -- information that may affect how government and private organizations nationwide respond to acts of terrorism. The Jessup-based Village Life Co. has been commissioned to conduct a research study on the response of faith-based relief organizations to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Based on the study results, Village Life will recommend changes that could improve the effectiveness of relief groups.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 24, 2001
PALAGINO, Russia - As the days turn warmer, the meadows here in central Russia are green and busy, full of people and cows, each person holding his cow by a rope as if walking a much-beloved pet. Nearly every villager has a cow, kept all winter in a shed attached to the house, and when the cows go outside for the first time in spring, they are easily frightened and likely to run off in panic. They need a steady, comforting hand until they grow accustomed once more to the long days of sunshine and freedom.
BUSINESS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Sun Staff Writer | March 12, 1995
When Guy Guzzone and his wife, Pam, moved three years ago to Kings Contrivance, a village in Columbia, he wasn't sure how they'd adapt to the "Columbia lifestyle."They had moved from Parkville in Baltimore County -- "a much more traditional community" -- so Mr. Guzzone could take a job in county government that required him to live in the planned new town.The Guzzones decided to rent an apartment instead of buying so they could keep their options open, just in case Columbia's cul-de-sacs and pathways, cluster mailboxes and interfaith centers didn't appeal to them.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | April 2, 1993
London. -- In Latin America, Africa and even in parts of Asia families are breaking up. Under the stresses of urban, capitalist life both the old extended family and the more modern nuclear family are falling apart. In their place is the ''spaghetti family'' with loose strands that link parts of the family but never the whole. It is an ominous and dangerous development.For years as I've traveled from Brazil to Morocco to India I have written occasional columns about street children and child laborers.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | January 10, 1993
In the late 1700s, a busy grain milling and textile center thrived in Howard County. Today, the remnants of its buildings and even its trash dump are providing valuable clues to 18th-century village life."
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | August 4, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- The real competition is on the beaches in the Olympic Village.Swiss men seem to be in vogue, but the Italians are close behind. Scandinavian women are popular.Barcelona's Olympic Village is like a huge outdoor party for the United Nations."I've been on the beach most of the afternoon," said Stuart Williams, 24, a cyclist from New Zealand. "I've been to other Olympic Villages, but they were concrete jungles."There are nearly 14,000 athletes and officials in the village, which also includes a discotheque, bowling lanes, video arcade and a free medical clinic, among other things.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | August 4, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- The real competition is on the beaches in the Olympic Village.Swiss men seem to be in vogue, but the Italians are close behind. Scandinavian women are popular.Barcelona's Olympic Village is like a huge outdoor party for the United Nations."I've been on the beach most of the afternoon," said Stuart Williams, 24, a cyclist from New Zealand. "I've been to other Olympic Villages, but they were concrete jungles."There are nearly 14,000 athletes and officials in the village, which also includes a discotheque, bowling lanes, video arcade and a free medical clinic, among other things.
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