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NEWS
March 12, 2003
ON A trip to New England one summer, I fell in love with a concept foreign to me in my 30-some years as a Baltimore native: the towns' epicenter of activity, the village green. On these humble grassy knolls, sometimes no bigger than a football field, town residents came together to throw Frisbees, walk dogs, exchange gossip, fly kites, enjoy concerts or simply linger. In winter, I was told, the activities changed mainly to ice skating and ice hockey, but the notion remained the same: an open green space where people gathered and, ultimately, bonded as members of a community.
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NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | December 12, 2013
A community group in the Loch Raven area got a first look Monday night at plans for Loch Raven Commons, a $45 million mixed-use development with up to 200 high-end apartments, commercial space and a village green proposed for the former Raytheon site on East Joppa Road. The meeting, which was held in Councilman David Marks' office, included the project's developer, the Buccini/Pollin Group, and an advisory committee comprising residents of nearby Towson Estates and Loch Raven Village that Marks formed earlier this year.
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NEWS
September 24, 2006
THE ISSUE: -- The Giant Food supermarket at Wilde Lake Village Center will close Sept. 28. How will this affect the community? What is the best way to use the soon-to-be vacant space? Departure will have a substantial impact After 39 years, the Wilde Lake Village Giant will be closing. The sudden departure of our commercial food retailer will have a substantial impact on the daily lives of residents, village merchants and all who rely on our local grocer to deliver their daily needs. The Wilde Lake Village Board has coordinated with village merchants to supply soft and hard goods from their shops.
NEWS
February 4, 2007
The Wilde Lake Community Association is seeking candidates for five seats on the village board and one seat on the Columbia Council, also known as the Columbia Association board of directors. The positions are for one year, beginning May 1. The nomination period runs from Feb. 20 through March 7. Interested residents can pick up a nomination packet, starting Feb. 20, at Slayton House on Wilde Lake Village Green. Information: 410-730-3987. Fundraiser to help Juanita Robinson Friends of Juanita Robinson, a resident of Harper's Choice who has served on the village board for eight years and is a recipient of the Howard County Volunteer of the Year award, is planning a fundraiser in her honor from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday at Kahler Hall in the Harper's Choice Village Center.
NEWS
By Sue Haller | April 14, 1992
If you were not at the Crofton Elementary School on Saturday, you missed out on some good weather and a lot of fun. The Crofton Civic Association held its annual Easter egg hunt for the kids, old and young.The weather was about as much as recreation assistant Sue Bents could hope for. The sun was shining, and the temperature was perfect. Children were put into one of three age categories and sent in searchof hidden eggs.No child left the hunt with an empty basket. Cookies and punch helped bring the day to a satisfying close.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | December 13, 1990
MALLS at Christmastime: crying babies sitting on Santa's lap, 5-year-olds whining for Nintendos, clerks snapping at fractious customers who want to know if they can get the same thing in mauve, marauding teen-agers slurping Diet Cokes, older men nodding off on benches while their wives do the holiday shopping.To some people, malls are a microcosm of America at its worst.Not to me. To me, they are America at it's best.No, I don't have mall-a-mania. I'm not one of those shoppers who can't quit.
NEWS
By SUE HALLER | April 26, 1994
The local baseball season got under way last weekend, so how in the world can it be time to register for fall sports?The Crofton Athletic Council will hold registration for soccer, football and future cheerleaders May 7 from 9 a.m. to noon, May 21 from noon to 3 p.m., and June 4 from 9 a.m. to noon.All three registration sessions will be at Crofton Elementary School on Duke of Kent Drive.The cost is $30 for soccer and future cheerleaders and $50 for football. Prices will go up to $40 for soccer and cheerleading and $75 for football June 30. The annual family registration fee of $40 is due also if it has not been paid for the 1994 season.
NEWS
By SUE HALLER | October 5, 1993
Sue Haller reports on events in Crofton.Have you ever wanted to try the boot-scooting boogie, sleazy slide, Hawaiian hustle or the down and dirty? The Crofton Civic Association is accepting registrations for a country-western dance class from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. beginning Thursday at Crofton Woods Elementary School. Jerry Thompson and Sandy Hilbert are the instructors. Classes will run on Thursdays through Nov. 11. For more information or to register, call Sue Bents at town hall, 721-2301.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1997
A cookbook in honor of Columbia's Wilde Lake village's 30th anniversary will be sold this weekend during the town's 30th birthday celebration at the Columbia Festival of the Arts.The 197-page book, "Wilde and Wonderful Recipes," is a compilation of about 250 recipes sprinkled with bits of history and personal recollections from village residents.The book, initially available by special order and at a birthday celebration in Wilde Lake on June 7, has sold as many as 400 copies at $6 each."The personal touches make it very, very special," says Bernice Kish, village manager.
NEWS
October 29, 2006
The Beale Street Puppets will present "Halloween Hijinx" for Rainbow Theatre at Slayton House on Wilde Lake Village Green at 4:30 p.m. tomorrow. The marionette show will feature Napoleon Bone-A-Part, Murray the Egyptian Mummy, and Vinnie Vampire and his All-Bat Trio. Children are invited to wear costumes and go trick-or-treating in the village center after the performance. Tickets are $4 and should be purchased in advance. Some tickets may be available at the door. Reservations are not accepted.
NEWS
October 29, 2006
The Beale Street Puppets will present "Halloween Hijinx" for Rainbow Theatre at Slayton House on Wilde Lake Village Green at 4:30 p.m. tomorrow. The marionette show will feature Napoleon Bone-A-Part, Murray the Egyptian Mummy, and Vinnie Vampire and his All-Bat Trio. Children are invited to wear costumes and go trick-or-treating in the village center after the performance. Tickets are $4 and should be purchased in advance. Some tickets may be available at the door. Reservations are not accepted.
NEWS
September 24, 2006
THE ISSUE: -- The Giant Food supermarket at Wilde Lake Village Center will close Sept. 28. How will this affect the community? What is the best way to use the soon-to-be vacant space? Departure will have a substantial impact After 39 years, the Wilde Lake Village Giant will be closing. The sudden departure of our commercial food retailer will have a substantial impact on the daily lives of residents, village merchants and all who rely on our local grocer to deliver their daily needs. The Wilde Lake Village Board has coordinated with village merchants to supply soft and hard goods from their shops.
NEWS
September 3, 2006
The Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks will sponsor "Another Way to See It" Laughter Club for those ages 55 and older. The program includes 40 minutes of laughter exercises and group sharing; it is said to lift enthusiasm, morale and motivation, and to encourage improved relationships. The club will meet from 9 a.m. to 9:40 a.m. Mondays, starting Sept. 11, at the Bain Center, 5470 Ruth Keeton Way. The cost is $2 a class. Information or registration: 410-313-7279. Slayton House to host free games Slayton House on Wilde Lake Village Green will offer drop in bridge games Tuesdays, Scrabble on Wednesdays, and a chance to bring a game to play Thursdays.
NEWS
March 12, 2003
ON A trip to New England one summer, I fell in love with a concept foreign to me in my 30-some years as a Baltimore native: the towns' epicenter of activity, the village green. On these humble grassy knolls, sometimes no bigger than a football field, town residents came together to throw Frisbees, walk dogs, exchange gossip, fly kites, enjoy concerts or simply linger. In winter, I was told, the activities changed mainly to ice skating and ice hockey, but the notion remained the same: an open green space where people gathered and, ultimately, bonded as members of a community.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 1999
SATURDAY'S SPRING Craft Fair at the Crofton Village Green was wonderful, right down to the weather. Artisans displayed a variety of wares to tempt the busy shoppers. People met friends and browsed through booths.But it wasn't the professional artisans who made the day a favorite community tradition; it was the variety of local organizations that gathered on the village green for fund raising, socializing and sharing the messages of their programs. At the Kiwanis table, Sharon Titcomb and Linda VanSickel, were selling herbs and flowering plants to brighten up neighborhood gardens.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1997
A cookbook in honor of Columbia's Wilde Lake village's 30th anniversary will be sold this weekend during the town's 30th birthday celebration at the Columbia Festival of the Arts.The 197-page book, "Wilde and Wonderful Recipes," is a compilation of about 250 recipes sprinkled with bits of history and personal recollections from village residents.The book, initially available by special order and at a birthday celebration in Wilde Lake on June 7, has sold as many as 400 copies at $6 each."The personal touches make it very, very special," says Bernice Kish, village manager.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 1999
SATURDAY'S SPRING Craft Fair at the Crofton Village Green was wonderful, right down to the weather. Artisans displayed a variety of wares to tempt the busy shoppers. People met friends and browsed through booths.But it wasn't the professional artisans who made the day a favorite community tradition; it was the variety of local organizations that gathered on the village green for fund raising, socializing and sharing the messages of their programs. At the Kiwanis table, Sharon Titcomb and Linda VanSickel, were selling herbs and flowering plants to brighten up neighborhood gardens.
NEWS
By SUE HALLER | October 12, 1993
What a difference one day can make. On Saturday, the temperature was in the 80s; on Sunday, we had to pull out winter clothes. If I had my way, we wouldn't need winter clothes, just summer.*The Ladies of the Elks, BPOE 2309, will be holding its fifth annual craft fair at the Bowie Elks Lodge, Route 450 in Crofton, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 30. Table space is still available to rent. For more information, call 262-4718 or 262-3834.*The Crofton Scrabble Club meets the second Friday of the month at Davidsonville Holy Family Catholic Church and the fourth Friday of the month at the Crofton Country Club.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1997
They were mostly idealistic twenty- and thirtysomethings with good careers and burgeoning families.They had heard that a new, different kind of community was being built in the wide-open farmland between Baltimore and Washington -- and they liked what they heard.They were Columbia's first residents -- pioneers, they called themselves -- and they began unpacking their boxes in the first Village of Wilde Lake three decades ago this month.As Columbia begins its 30th-birthday celebration this summer -- a party in Wilde Lake kicked it off yesterday -- many of Columbia's first residents are retired, and their once-modern homes need refurbishing.
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