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Village Center

NEWS
August 21, 2001
Long Reach Community Association will present its 22nd annual Country Fair from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sept. 8, rain or shine, at the Long Reach village center. Music, homemade food, crafts, pony rides, a moon bounce and games will be featured. Spaces for artisans, food concessions and commercial vendors are available. The cost for artisans is $20; the cost for commercial vendors is $70. Information: 410-730- 8113. Vendor spaces available for church flea market Vendor spaces are available for a flea market to be sponsored by Christ Episcopal Church on Sept.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1995
The executive committee of the board overseeing Baltimore's multimillion-dollar federal revitalization effort yesterday approved its third "village center," this one covering the West Baltimore communities of Sandtown-Winchester, Mondawmin and Penn-North.Last month, the board approved the creation of village centers for the East Baltimore neighborhoods around the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions and Washington Village in Southwest.The village centers are conceived of as a key link between residents of the city's $100 million empowerment zone and the quasi-public corporation overseeing the grant.
NEWS
July 3, 1997
ONE THING WORSE than a poorly performing supermarket: No supermarket at all. That became apparent this week when Giant Food Inc. closed its Oakland Mills store recently and made it even more critical that the village center's landlord, the Rouse Co., fill the void. Residents and merchants need an anchor supermarket to keep their village center viable.How long can residents feel connected to a community that has lost the grocery store that held their village center together? How long can merchants remain afloat without the customers an anchor store generates?
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | June 21, 2009
The movement to alter or defeat a zoning bill intended to create a way to redevelop ailing Columbia village centers got an unexpected boost when the county Planning Board chairman revealed Monday night that he opposes the measure. The five-member board had split 2-2 on the issue March 23, passing the zoning bill on to the Howard County Council without a recommendation. David Grabowski, an Elkridge resident with a background in construction, had been out of town that night and Vice Chairman Gary Rosenbaum said he forgot to make a prearranged call to get the chairman's vote.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 2000
Eight years ago, an experiment in the performing arts was begun at Kings Contrivance Village Center, when several local musical ensembles, many of them representing Howard County public schools, were booked to perform a concert series during the summer. Public response to those free family concerts was so positive that the number of offerings grew each year, according to Kathy VanNostrand, marketing coordinator for Columbia Management Inc., an affiliate of the Rouse Co. Eight summers later, area performers have begun presenting some 120 shows spread among eight of Columbia's 10 village centers.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2002
Four sites - each with a different owner - sit vacant in the Oakland Mills Village Center, symbols of the challenge of re-energizing the struggling center. The Oakland Mills Village Center Revitalization Committee is focusing on those sites, brainstorming possible uses, as it attempts to develop a strategy to make the village center - the only one in Columbia without a grocery store - more economically competitive. "There has been kind of a lack of unified planning because each entity is responsible for their own space," said Barbara Russell, a Columbia councilwoman who represents Oakland Mills and is a member of the committee.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
Oakland Mills Village Center has another opportunity to fill an empty building, a key piece to its rejuvenation. A liquor license application submitted this week by a prospective restaurant operator moves the village center a step closer to filling the void left by the closing of Last Chance Saloon, a 23-year-old neighborhood pub and restaurant. Vaughn Ennis, one of the three partners in the venture, said the establishment would be "a standard American family restaurant," serving a variety of dishes, including seafood.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1995
Community organizers soon will be spreading the word throughout East Baltimore on programs run by the city's multimillion-dollar federal revitalization effort, while specialists concentrate on neighborhood issues concerning youth, employment and economic development.These paid workers will be the core of the first, and largest, of six neighborhood "village centers" that will operate within Baltimore's $100 million "empowerment zone" in decayed areas of East, West and South Baltimore.The board overseeing the city's effort has approved $307,000 to fund the first year's budget for the center, to be run by the Historic East Baltimore Community Action Coalition, for residents the empowerment zone around the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2000
On Jan. 11, 1990, at 1:44 p.m., a virtually cloudless Thursday afternoon in east Columbia, Fred Cook found a tragic immortality of sorts, as a symbol of a once-thriving village center's early steps into decline. A broad-shouldered 58-year-old guard for Loomis Armored Car Inc., Frederick John Cook Jr. was shot at point-blank range by a masked robber as he wheeled a cart loaded with cash toward the Signet Bank branch at Long Reach Village Center. His violent death was, in the memories of some residents and shop owners, a symbolic turning point for the Long Reach Village Center, which was to see almost a decade of slipping business before beginning to recover.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2003
More than nine months after Food Lion announced it would take up operations in the Oakland Mills Village Center, replacing a Metro Food Market that has been a dark hole in the center for two years, the grocer has yet to begin renovations. Plans for the 42,000- square-foot store were stalled because of problems with the lease, a Food Lion spokeswoman said, and although the company expects the store to open next year, the spokeswoman said she did not know when renovations to the building could begin.
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