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Viktor Chernomyrdin

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NEWS
July 12, 1995
The hospitalization of Boris N. Yeltsin with "acute" heart troubles forces everyone to think about the day when he is no longer in power.As Russia's first post-Soviet president, Mr. Yeltsin has had an unenviably hard task. He has had both successes and failures. Many of his instincts have been good, even though his behavior has often been erratic.In his hard drinking and impulsiveness he is a true son of Russia, whose lifestyle recalls Alexei Tolstoy's adage: "When you love, love with passion; when you threaten, threaten with intention; when you insult, insult only in anger; when you strike, strike with all you've got; when you quarrel, quarrel with courage; when you punish, punish with a reason; when you forgive, forgive with all your heart, when you party, party through the night."
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NEWS
July 12, 1995
The hospitalization of Boris N. Yeltsin with "acute" heart troubles forces everyone to think about the day when he is no longer in power.As Russia's first post-Soviet president, Mr. Yeltsin has had an unenviably hard task. He has had both successes and failures. Many of his instincts have been good, even though his behavior has often been erratic.In his hard drinking and impulsiveness he is a true son of Russia, whose lifestyle recalls Alexei Tolstoy's adage: "When you love, love with passion; when you threaten, threaten with intention; when you insult, insult only in anger; when you strike, strike with all you've got; when you quarrel, quarrel with courage; when you punish, punish with a reason; when you forgive, forgive with all your heart, when you party, party through the night."
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 11, 1993
MOSCOW -- Under pressure from Western governments an the International Monetary Fund, which are stepping up their aid, the Russian central bank has agreed with the Russian government for the first time on the amount of new credits it will issue.Although technical and possibly temporary, covering only the second quarter of this year, the agreement is important. The unrestrained issuing of credits by the central bank has driven Russian inflation to dangerous levels, devalued the ruble and undermined the economic reforms of President Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 20, 1995
MOSCOW -- Russian television viewers have a pretty high threshold for amazement. That's understandable in a country that has recently watched a coup attempt, its empire die, an internationally broadcast assault by the president on Parliament, and a brutal war.But even for Russia, the sight of the stolid, dour prime minister, Viktor Chernomyrdin, negotiating live, on television, with the leader of a band of Chechen terrorists provoked amazement here yesterday.People...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 20, 1995
MOSCOW -- Russian television viewers have a pretty high threshold for amazement. That's understandable in a country that has recently watched a coup attempt, its empire die, an internationally broadcast assault by the president on Parliament, and a brutal war.But even for Russia, the sight of the stolid, dour prime minister, Viktor Chernomyrdin, negotiating live, on television, with the leader of a band of Chechen terrorists provoked amazement here yesterday.People...
NEWS
May 24, 1998
NOT SINCE Lenin's Bolsheviks overthrew the Romanov dynasty in 1917 has Russia been ruled by as young a group of eager beavers as the new Kremlin government.But youth is not the only remarkable thing about the cabinet that 35-year-old Prime Minister Sergei Kiriyenko has assembled based on President Boris N. Yeltsin's wishes.The cumbersome post-Soviet governmental structure -- with two first deputy prime ministers and seven deputy prime ministers -- has been streamlined.Will this fresh and simplified leadership group perform any better than Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin's government of more seasoned bureaucrats?
NEWS
July 3, 1996
FIVE YEARS after the collapse of communism, Russia may have many outward trappings of an open society but it is far from a normal Western-style democracy. Just consider the bizarre disappearance of President Boris N. Yeltsin and the difficult-to-believe official assurances that he just lost his voice and had to cancel prior commitments on the eve of today's crucial run-off election.In a truly open country, the media and the voters would demand full disclosure. Not in Russia, though, where it has for centuries been an accepted practice to utter untruths and have them not challenged by others, even though they are easily recognized as lies.
NEWS
February 5, 1997
IT IS DIFFICULT to have confidence in the Russian government's promise to budget the money needed to fulfill its role in building an international space station. Russia's prior verbal support for the project has not translated into the funds necessary to prevent dangerous delays. It now appears the Russians are a year behind in building a service module scheduled for launch in April 1998. They now contend it will be ready by November 1998, but that's hard to believe.The country is cash-starved and its leadership is tenuous.
NEWS
July 6, 1996
"WHAT IS TO BE DONE?" is the Russian equivalent of Hamlet's "To be or not to be." That question was the title of a novel by 19th century author and literary critic Nikolai Chernyshevsky, a book which had such an influence on Vladimir Lenin that the Bolshevik leader used it in one of his most influential theoretical tracts. Today the question is again asked -- this time in regard to Russia's political situation after President Boris N. Yeltsin's re-election.As important as is the symbolism of free elections that now have been institutionalized as part of Russia's democratic reforms, that country's political system is woefully underdeveloped by Western standards.
NEWS
December 29, 1992
These are the days of hope and confusion in Russia.Many Russians are preparing to observe the New Year. Millions of others are returning to the observance of the spirit and traditions of Christmas, which was banned for more than seven decades by communists. Under the calendar used by the Russian Orthodox Church, the resurrected religious holiday falls on Jan. 7. Between these competing holidays, the whole country is a study of a society in cultural and political conflict.Only a year has elapsed since the ouster of Mikhail S. Gorbachev and the collapse of communism.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 11, 1993
MOSCOW -- Under pressure from Western governments an the International Monetary Fund, which are stepping up their aid, the Russian central bank has agreed with the Russian government for the first time on the amount of new credits it will issue.Although technical and possibly temporary, covering only the second quarter of this year, the agreement is important. The unrestrained issuing of credits by the central bank has driven Russian inflation to dangerous levels, devalued the ruble and undermined the economic reforms of President Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
March 14, 1998
IT IS A measure of Russia's instability that every time Boris N. Yeltsin gets sick, speculation soars over the true state of his health. That, in turn, triggers a guessing game about his eventual successor.Look at the jockeying in Moscow these days. As soon as news began to spread that the 67-year-old president was ill (throat trouble this time, according to the official Kremlin announcement), billionaire banker and manipulator Boris Berezovsky branded Mr. Yeltsin's deputy and economic reform planner Anatoly Chubais a "total failure."
NEWS
January 30, 1994
An intriguing aspect in the tug-of-war over economic reform in Russia is the quiet re-emergence of two old Gorbachev advisers. After three years in the political wilderness, Leonid Abalkin, a former Soviet vice premier, and his right-hand man, Nikolai Petrakov, have been called back to advise the government on straightening out the economy.Their return does not mean that Mikhail S. Gorbachev is on the way back. He is universally scorned in Russia. But now that Economics Chief Yegor Gaidar and Finance Minister Boris Fyodorov have been ousted and their radical Western advisers have resigned, the Russian government is unmistakably abandoning bold monetarist reform in favor of more cautious steps.
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