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By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
An Anne Arundel County councilman used an ethnic slur during a council meeting held Thursday night to appoint a replacement for a vacant seat on the body. Councilman Richard B. "Dick" Ladd, a Broadneck Republican, referred to "gooks" from his seat on the dais when speaking about his time serving in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. While questioning a candidate for the vacant seat on the council, Ladd remarked on their similar Army service. When another councilman teased Ladd, 71, about which war he may have served during, Ladd said: "I was in the Vietnam War. It wasn't the Revolutionary War. I was there chasing down the gooks.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
Nearly 40 years ago, a haunting photograph of a naked Vietnamese girl running in anguish after being severely burned in a napalm bomb attack on her village became an iconic image of the Vietnam War. But most who have seen the Pulitzer Prize-winning shot probably haven't heard the obscure song it inspired more than three decades later, says Hugo Keesing, a self-taught music historian. "The Girl in the Picture (Napalm Girl)," released by Yanah in 2004, is one of more than 300 famous and not-so-famous songs and spoken-word tracks about the war that are included in a 13-CD anthology assembled by Keesing, a Columbia resident.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 16, 2011
- When President Barack Obama went to Fort Bragg the other day to proclaim the end of the nearly nine-year war in Iraq, it was hardly what you would call a traditional victory lap. There was no wild V-I Day to match the V-E and V-J Days that kicked off nationwide jubilation at the end of World War II. The most Mr. Obama could proclaim was that America wished a "welcome home" to the last of the 1.5 million American troops who had served in...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 17, 2011
Etna A. Weinhold, a former combat nurse who served with the Army in Vietnam and later spent four decades at Greater Baltimore Medical Center as clinical manager of its postpartum units, died Nov. 10 of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 67 and had lived in Towson. "She will forever be the needle, which for 40 years wove the tapestry of who GBMC is to our community, proclaiming by her very breath: in all we do the patient always comes first," wrote chaplain J. Joseph Hart, executive director of spiritual support services and executive director of GBMC's Center for Spiritual Support Training.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
Brig. Gen. Raymond J. Winkel Jr., a retired career Army officer and a Vietnam War veteran who was chairman of the physics department at West Point for more than two decades, died Aug. 30 of cancer at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda. He was 65. The son of a civil engineer and a homemaker, General Winkel was born in Baltimore and raised in Gardenville. He attended Polytechnic Institute and was 17 when appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2011
George Gilbert Ganjon, a retired Carroll County farmer who was a founder of the Downtown Farmers Market, died of kidney failure Aug. 1 at Dove House in Westminster. He was 82. Born in Baltimore, he grew up near the Hollins Market in the southwestern section of the city. He was a 1947 Catonsville High School graduate. He met his future wife, Alvina "Sis" Jackson, at the Cross Street Market in South Baltimore, where she, her parents and brothers ran produce and flower stalls.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 25, 2011
Edward M. "Mike" Miller, a decorated Vietnam War veteran who later worked in real estate sales and was a flea market manager, died Feb. 14 of a brain tumor at his Fallston home. He was 62. The son of a clothing cutter and a homemaker, Mr. Miller was born and raised in East Baltimore. He graduated in 1968 from Northern High School and was drafted into the Army the next year. Mr. Miller served as a radioman with the 101st Airborne in Vietnam. "He was with a small group, and they thought the enemy was a small group at the top of a hill.
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