Advertisement
HomeCollectionsVietnam War
IN THE NEWS

Vietnam War

NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 25, 2011
Edward M. "Mike" Miller, a decorated Vietnam War veteran who later worked in real estate sales and was a flea market manager, died Feb. 14 of a brain tumor at his Fallston home. He was 62. The son of a clothing cutter and a homemaker, Mr. Miller was born and raised in East Baltimore. He graduated in 1968 from Northern High School and was drafted into the Army the next year. Mr. Miller served as a radioman with the 101st Airborne in Vietnam. "He was with a small group, and they thought the enemy was a small group at the top of a hill.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 11, 2011
Clay Dell "Skip" Edmonds, a retired mechanic who served in Vietnam with the Marine Corps, died Feb. 4 of Agent Orange-related leukemia at his Woodbine home. He was 63. Mr. Edmonds was born in Baltimore and raised in Lansdowne. He attended Woodlawn High School. "He was 17 and forged his mother's name in order to join the Marine Corps in 1965," said his wife of 14 years, the former Jeanie Pickett. He was assigned as a tank mechanic to an infantry unit in Vietnam. "He volunteered for three tours of duty during the Vietnam War," said a daughter, Taryn Wilson of Bel Air. Mr. Edmonds was discharged from the Marine Corps in 1977 and remained an active reservist until 1994.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2010
William M. "Pops" Palmer Jr., a retired career Marine Corps officer and Vietnam veteran who later became a commercial pilot and educator, died Tuesday at his Sykesville home of complications after colon surgery. He was 65. William Merrill Palmer Jr., the son of an insurance salesman and a Stewart's department store manager, was born in Baltimore and raised in Arbutus. He was a 1963 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and began his college studies at the Georgia Institute of Technology before being appointed to the Naval Academy.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2010
Donald Phillip Townsend, a highly decorated Vietnam War veteran who became a licensed thoroughbred horse breeder, died Nov. 29 from complications after blocked blood vessel surgery at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Keymar resident was 61. Mr. Townsend, the son of a stationary engineer and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown. After graduating from Patterson Park High School in 1967, Mr. Townsend was drafted into the Army in 1968 and served as an infantryman with the 1st Cavalry Division in Vietnam.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 23, 2010
Americans everywhere at home are in torment. They are being asked for what today seems to pass as the supreme sacrifice — undergoing intrusive body searches for their own and their country's safety. There was a time in not-too-distant memory when the word "sacrifice" meant something here — such as during World War II and the Vietnam War. Then, Americans had to lay their lives on the line in the tens and hundreds of thousands for it. That fact was particularly true in the 1941-45 fight against German and Japanese totalitarianism, in which 405,000 Americans died, literally in defense of our political and democratic system, as imperfect as it may be. It was true, perhaps to a lesser extent, in Vietnam from the early 1960s through 1975, when another 58,000 Americans lost their lives and many thousands more were wounded in a failed effort to deny communism another outpost in Southeast Asia.
NEWS
By Paul Marx | May 24, 2010
With the revelation that Richard Blumenthal, the U.S. Senate candidate in Connecticut, received five draft deferments during the Vietnam War, and with the country now involved in two wars, the draft has become a subject of renewed interest. Mr. Blumenthal apparently did not oppose the war on principle. He seems to have requested the deferments for two reasons: He did not want to take the chance of putting himself at risk in the war zone, and he did not want his blossoming career interrupted.
NEWS
March 15, 2010
It doesn't seem so long ago, when I still had hair, that I marched in the streets with many members of my generation to protest our nation's participation in the Vietnam War. We burned our draft cards, railed against LBJ and sang, "All we are saying is give peace a chance." We knew, when it was out time to lead, that war would be a thing of the past. Today, we are involved in a permanent state of war. While winding down from an unfortunate excursion in Iraq, we are escalating our presence in Afghanistan, a place where no one has ever been able to bring much order, and we don't even seem to question it. We just accept it!
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.