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By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
Nearly 40 years ago, a haunting photograph of a naked Vietnamese girl running in anguish after being severely burned in a napalm bomb attack on her village became an iconic image of the Vietnam War. But most who have seen the Pulitzer Prize-winning shot probably haven't heard the obscure song it inspired more than three decades later, says Hugo Keesing, a self-taught music historian. "The Girl in the Picture (Napalm Girl)," released by Yanah in 2004, is one of more than 300 famous and not-so-famous songs and spoken-word tracks about the war that are included in a 13-CD anthology assembled by Keesing, a Columbia resident.
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By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Joseph F. Nawrozki III, a retired investigative reporter who served on the staff of three Baltimore daily newspapers and was a Vietnam War combat veteran, died of leukemia Saturday at his Bel Air home. He was 70. "Joe had a real instinct for the underdog. He looked into their hearts," said Michael Olesker, a former Baltimore Sun columnist who was Mr. Nawrozki's investigative partner at the old News American. "His working-class background and his experience in Vietnam informed everything he wrote.
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FEATURES
June 12, 1991
A replica of the Vietnam War Memorial will be in Baltimore this weekend at Meadowridge Memorial Park, 7250 Washington Blvd.The 240-foot replica of the Washington, D.C. monument will be the centerpiece of the "Vietnam War Experience" Friday through Sunday, which will include honor guards, memorial ceremonies and a reading of the names of soldiers killed in Vietnam. For more information, call 796-1144.
NEWS
September 15, 2014
I am saddened that President Barack Obama, who rode to election promising to end wars, has once again essentially called on us to go to war ( "ISIS is not invincible," Sept. 9). I am also saddened that there is so little protest. This is so different than during the Vietnam War when the conscience of the American people and especially our youth rallied us to action that eventually led to peace. All this will have tragic consequences. The violence of terrorism cannot be eradicated by more violence.
NEWS
February 6, 1994
There is no date when this nation's war in Vietnam began. It escalated during the 1960s from a few advisers to a massive engagement. Some would say March 8, 1965, when U.S. combatants arrived in unit strength. Similarly there is no date for the war's end, which evolved starting with the cease-fire agreement of Jan. 27, 1973. Many will say it ended -- emotionally -- on Feb. 3, 1994, when President Clinton announced an end to the economic boycott of Vietnam and an agreement to establish liaison offices in Hanoi and Washington.
NEWS
By Helen Schary Motro | August 12, 2001
NEW YORK - During the Vietnam War, I knew young men who scrambled for a 4F draft deferment, who ran to grad school while it still meant deferral, who lucked out with a high draft number, who enlisted in ROTC, who fled to Canada. But I knew nobody who served in that heart of darkness. Among my male contemporaries, the goal of avoiding Vietnam overshadowed all else. As college students in Chicago, we joined pickets in front of the business school when a corporation said to have made napalm for U.S. Army use in Vietnam came to interview on campus.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon | August 25, 2008
Bernard "Butch" Edgar Stickell Jr., a Vietnam War veteran who was awarded the Purple Heart, died of heart failure Aug. 17 at Veteran Affairs Medical Center in Baltimore. The Pasadena resident was 60. After graduating from Glen Burnie High School, Mr. Stickell served in the Army as a combat medic, achieving the rank of specialist fifth class. In addition to the Purple Heart, he received the National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, Combat Infantryman's Badge, Vietnam Campaign Medal and Army Commendation Medal.
NEWS
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,sun staff | March 16, 1997
"SOG," by John L. Plaster. Simon and Schuster. 365 pages. $25.This is the saddest story I've ever heard. It's about a generation of American Special Forces soldiers - senior NCOs, mostly, and ex-NCOs field-commissioned as junior officers - who gave themselves over to the Vietnam War without a whimper or a twitch of hesitation. They were like Housman's mercenaries: They took their wages and are -mostly - dead.Under the administratively banal code name "Studies and Observations Group," they served primarily as small unit reconnaissance teams operating from forward outposts.
NEWS
November 21, 2008
Col. James Curtis Burris, a highly decorated career Army officer who fought in the Vietnam War, died Nov. 13 at his Havre de Grace home of cancers related to exposure to Agent Orange. He was 78. Colonel Burris, who was born and raised in Tulsa, Okla., graduated from Tulsa Central High School in 1948. Born into a military family, Colonel Burris was the grandson of two Civil War veterans and the son of a World War I veteran. He enlisted in the Army in 1948 and was selected to attend the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., from which he graduated with a bachelor's degree in engineering in 1954.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Staff Writer | November 10, 1993
Diane Carlson Evans, a former Army nurse in Vietnam, looked at Frederick Hart's moving statue of three infantrymen that had been added to the Vietnam War Memorial and wondered, "Where are the women?"The names of the eight women who had died in Vietnam were among the 58,000 inscribed in the wall. But 11,000 military women served in the 12-year-long war. Almost all were nurses or medical personnel. Their quick action saved the lives of many of the 350,000 wounded soldiers who passed through their units.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Three Vietnam War veterans stood on the ramparts of Fort McHenry, gazed onto the Patapsco where British warships launched hundreds of rockets and mortar shells almost 200 years ago, and imagined the scene that unfolded during the Battle of Baltimore. "I know rain was pouring down, and with all the shooting and shelling for more than 24 hours, they had no idea if they were going to survive," said Chuck Gallinger, 69, of Oshkosh, Wis., who served in Southeast Asia in 1966. Gallinger and his friends - in town for a reunion of their unit, the 709th Maintenance Battalion of the 9th Infantry - had stopped for a taste of the Star-Spangled Spectacular, Baltimore's bicentennial celebration of its defense against the British and the writing of the national anthem.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Robert W. Weinhold Sr., a decorated Army Airborne Ranger in the Vietnam War who later worked for several financial institutions, died Monday at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center of kidney failure. He was 75. The son of Herman W. Weinhold, a textile millworker, and Mary Alice Weinhold, a homemaker, Robert Winway Weinhold was born and raised in Methuen, Mass., where he graduated in 1956 from Methuen High School. He enrolled at Norwich University in Northfield, Vt., where he was captain and quarterback for the university's football team.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Hundreds of mourners bid farewell Thursday to Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene, the highest-ranking Army officer killed in combat since the Vietnam War. General Greene, a former leader at Aberdeen Proving Ground who was shot to death last week in Afghanistan, was laid to rest during a somber ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery. His wife, retired Col. Sue Myers, and their son, Lt. Matthew J. Greene, saluted his flag-draped coffin as a howitzer fired a 13-gun salute. The burial followed a private memorial service attended by 800 mourners, many in uniform, at Joint Base Myers-Henderson Hall.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 9, 2014
On the occasion of this week's 40th anniversary of Richard Nixon'sresignation from the presidency, The Washington Post  sponsored a reunion featuring Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, the Watergate reporters who "brought down" the 37th president. In fact, Nixon committed political suicide. He thought he could get away with what other politicians had done, but forgot the rules are different for Republicans. The Post event resembled a celebration with much laughter and stories about how Publisher Katharine Graham and Executive Editor Ben Bradlee had told the newsroom "no gloating" when it became apparent Nixon would resign.
NEWS
June 10, 2014
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s commentary ( "'No soldier left behind,'" June 8) contains some untruths that need to be questioned. His description, "the U.S. military, the greatest force for good on planet Earth," is an outdated notion that demonstrates he is not aware of reality. Read, "Kill Anything That Moves," to see the very late documentation of the atrocities committed by policy then covered up when the Vietnam War ended. If the Nuremberg trials were organized after the German slaughter, then one should have been organized at the end of the Vietnam War. You don't know what the Pentagon and the military did here.
NEWS
June 5, 2014
Today is the 70 t h anniversary of D-Day, the massive invasion of Normandy that cost the lives of 9,000 Allied soldiers. It is a day not only for recalling the heroic efforts of those who stormed the beaches that day but of the World War II generation generally and, by extension, all who have served the United States in uniform during times of war. The tributes to these brave soldiers will flow effortlessly off the tongues of politicians....
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1995
WASHINGTON -- After 27 years of public silence, a key architect of the Vietnam War recounts in newly published memoirs a long series of errors in judgment by himself and others that led to America's biggest and most politically divisive military failure, concluding, "We were wrong, terribly wrong."Robert S. McNamara, the former Ford executive who became secretary of defense under Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, says in a new, 414-page chronicle that the United States should have withdrawn its forces from Vietnam in 1963 or 1964, before the huge buildup that sent U.S. casualties soaring and American protesters into the streets.
NEWS
November 8, 2006
Ronald Charles Rose, a retired state corrections training officer and Vietnam War veteran, died of multiple medical conditions Thursday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Homeland resident was 63. Mr. Rose was born and raised in Vandergrift, Pa., and served in the Marine Corps from 1960 to 1966. "It was while he was serving in Vietnam from 1964 to 1966 that he was exposed to Agent Orange, which eventually led to diabetes, heart and lung problems," said his wife of 24 years, the former Lynne Warren.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
Virginia Bates, a poet and artist who opposed the Vietnam War and was a founder of the Howard County Peace Action Community, died of complications from the flu Dec. 9 at Bridgepoint of Los Altos, an assisted-living facility in California. The former Woodbine resident was 88. Virginia Neumann was born in Baltimore. She was the daughter of William Neumann, a plumber, and Elinor Neumann, a homemaker. She was a 1942 graduate of Western High School and earned a degree in literature from Case-Western Reserve University in Cleveland.
NEWS
By Fred L. Pincus | December 24, 2013
With all the discussion of surveillance, meta-data and phone taps over the past few weeks, I can't help thinking of my own experience as a surveillee back in the 1970s when cruder methods were used. All of the reassurances that everything will be fine just don't work for me. I was an anti-war, anti-racist, socialist activist back in the late 1960s and early 1970s, although the only illegal thing that I did was to sit down in the Charles and Mulberry intersection in 1970 with several thousand others to protest the Vietnam War. I didn't know that the FBI was keeping tabs on me until I requested my files through the Freedom of Information Act in 1977.
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