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By Harry G. Summers | March 6, 1991
THE VIETNAM syndrome is over!" So proclaimed President Bush on Friday, March 1. He didn't need to tell Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein, who had tried to fight that war all over again. In a strange way, the gulf war ended almost exactly as the Vietnam War did, just as Hussein claimed it would. But to his surprise, instead of playing the role of North Vietnam's Ho Chi Minh, as he intended, he found himself playing the role of South Vietnam's Nguyen Van Thieu.In October, 1972, U.S. national security adviser Henry A. Kissinger met with Thieu to present the U.S. proposals to end the Vietnam War. As The Baltimore Sun's Arnold Isaacs reported, Thieu commented bitterly that to the United States, South Vietnam was no more than a dot on the map. Its loss would mean little to the United States, which had its own strategies to pursue with Moscow and Peking.
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NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | May 27, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - After Newsweek's retraction of its Quran desecration story, some conservative media know exactly why this error occurred. "The press corps suffers from its own Vietnam syndrome," proclaimed The Wall Street Journal's editorial page. "This is part of a basic media mistrust of the military that goes back to Vietnam and has shown itself with a vengeance during the Iraq conflict and the war on terror." Conservative columnists and talk shows accuse the media of undermining the troops.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcoverand Jack W.Germond | November 18, 1990
Washington -- When the United States finally pulled out of Vietnam in 1975, much of the credit -- or blame -- was assigned to the aggressive anti-war movement that had developed slowly but inexorably during the American involvement there. That involvement could not be sustained because there no longer was sufficient support for it at home.Furthermore, a product of the experience was what came to be known as "the Vietnam syndrome" -- an attitude of never-again to American military adventures abroad in which U.S. interests were not so unambiguously present that home-front solidarity would be assured.
NEWS
By Cokie & Steven V. Roberts | August 11, 1995
THE JUXTAPOSITION could not have been more striking: Hiroshima and Hanoi -- two wars with two very different endings, and two very different lessons.The bang that concluded World War II, in addition to ushering in the atomic age and all that implies, taught us anew that victory requires might. In the half-century that's followed we've spent much of our treasure making sure no one is mightier. Candidates soft on defense" have seen their political lives comes to untimely ends. And now in Congress, Republican senators, convinced they can't trust the Defense Department of a Democratic administration, are busy adding more money to the Pentagon budget than the generals have asked for, including funding for Ronald Reagan's missile defense system, Star Wars.
NEWS
March 3, 1991
President Bush has at last rid the country of its Vietnam syndrome, of the inferiority complex that for two decades caused many Americans to doubt their government and even themselves.The United States now knows that its armed forces can shoot straight and its national security is in good hands. With its self-confidence restored, it need no longer approach its world role apologetically or to feel it cannot compete effectively in international commerce.This frame of mind has its dangers. If the country swaggers too much or gets an exaggerated idea of its manifest destiny, it can get carried away in imposing what Mr. Bush calls the "new world order."
NEWS
By The Providence (R.I.) Sunday Journal | March 19, 1991
TRUE TO his gentleman's code, President Bush refrained from gloating the other evening as he stood before Congress, and listened and watched as wave after wave of applause washed over him, and standing ovations greeted various phrases in his half-hour speech.The president certainly had reason to feel gratified.Yet it is worth noting that humility, as much as pride, was the note that the president repeatedly struck last Wednesday evening.This tells us a lot about George Bush as well. The president would be foolish to waste the political capital he has accumulated, but it is evident that Bush does not expect to settle scores or cause havoc or seek vengeance in the capital.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | June 12, 1994
BELGRADE -- While the southern Serbian town of Valjevo awaits an exceptional event, the country's first war crimes trial, retribution of a different kind already is being meted out to countless Serbian men who have returned from Yugoslavia's dirty wars.They have succumbed to post-traumatic stress disorder -- known popularly as "Vietnam syndrome." The luckiest suffer sleeplessness, recurring nightmares, erratic behavior and a feeling of alienation. The worst-affected are being driven to frenzies of killing and suicide.
NEWS
March 15, 1991
"By God," President Bush declared after the Persian Gulf War was won, "we have kicked the Vietnam syndrome."Many interpretations may be put on this statement, but generally the president was taken to mean that 17 years after a humiliating defeat in Vietnam, America had banished self-doubt and emerged once again as the self-confident colossus of the globe. Margaret Thatcher, visiting America last week, verified this belief by declaring that Bush got it right when he said the United States is the sole nation which has both the moral authority and the military wherewithal to make the world's miscreants behave.
NEWS
By J. Herbert Altschull | March 20, 1991
NOW THAT the war is over and the killing has stopped, it's surprising that so many politicians, journalists and academics have adopted without question President Bush's assertion that the war was fought to achieve what he calls a "new world order."That argument is pure nonsense. There is nothing "new." There is no "world" involved and there is certainly no question of "order." Repetition of that phrase must simply be the result of a highly successful public relations campaign.There is nothing new about a mighty military power utterly vanquishing a weaker power.
NEWS
October 9, 1992
Clinton toured Moscow at war's peakClinton does not recollect much of tripAs Clinton toured, Moscow shunned PerotBush: Clinton should tell all about Moscow* * * The four headlines quoted above were bannered in the right-wing Washington Times on Oct. 5, 6, 7 and 8. They represent the latest Republican foray into the ungentle art of negative campaigning, a euphemism for slinging mud with abandon. Having just about wrung the cloth dry on Bill Clinton as skirt-chaser and draft-skirter, the Bush team came up with the specter of Bill Clinton as peacenik organizer, USA trasher and dupe of the KGB.Never one to be squeamish under duress, President Bush joined in the fun by questioning his opponent's patriotism and promising he would have more later on this juicy subject.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- It was easy for members of the Senate to cast crowd-pleasing votes to end the arms embargo against Bosnia. No one can watch the television films of the Serbs' savage "ethnic cleansing" without being horrified.And the notion of the Bosnians being denied the weapons they need to defend themselves is abhorrent. Besides, senators don't have to carry out the policies they set. Their idea of dealing with a problem usually is to hold a public hearing.But it would be a mistake to view the Senate vote as simply a political expression designed by Majority Leader Bob Dole to embarrass the White House and further his own campaign for the Republican presidential nomination.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | June 12, 1994
BELGRADE -- While the southern Serbian town of Valjevo awaits an exceptional event, the country's first war crimes trial, retribution of a different kind already is being meted out to countless Serbian men who have returned from Yugoslavia's dirty wars.They have succumbed to post-traumatic stress disorder -- known popularly as "Vietnam syndrome." The luckiest suffer sleeplessness, recurring nightmares, erratic behavior and a feeling of alienation. The worst-affected are being driven to frenzies of killing and suicide.
NEWS
October 9, 1992
Clinton toured Moscow at war's peakClinton does not recollect much of tripAs Clinton toured, Moscow shunned PerotBush: Clinton should tell all about Moscow* * * The four headlines quoted above were bannered in the right-wing Washington Times on Oct. 5, 6, 7 and 8. They represent the latest Republican foray into the ungentle art of negative campaigning, a euphemism for slinging mud with abandon. Having just about wrung the cloth dry on Bill Clinton as skirt-chaser and draft-skirter, the Bush team came up with the specter of Bill Clinton as peacenik organizer, USA trasher and dupe of the KGB.Never one to be squeamish under duress, President Bush joined in the fun by questioning his opponent's patriotism and promising he would have more later on this juicy subject.
NEWS
By Tom Wicker | August 9, 1991
NEW YORK -- AFTER QUICK military victory in the desert war, President Bush exulted that the nation had "kicked the Vietnam syndrome" -- its supposed reluctance, after defeat in Indochina, to send U.S. troops to fight elsewhere in the world. Did that conviction embolden Bush to embark on military intervention against the Shining Path in Peru?Or have presidents suffered more, and for longer, from what might be called "the Peru syndrome" -- the idea that U.S. forces are required, and can prevail, anywhere U.S. interests appear to be threatened, or might be advanced?
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | June 11, 1991
NEW YORK -- Even in his euphoria, after marching off Broadway at the end of New York's welcome home parade, Army Spc. Michael Prins wondered how long the feeling would last."
NEWS
By J. Herbert Altschull | March 20, 1991
NOW THAT the war is over and the killing has stopped, it's surprising that so many politicians, journalists and academics have adopted without question President Bush's assertion that the war was fought to achieve what he calls a "new world order."That argument is pure nonsense. There is nothing "new." There is no "world" involved and there is certainly no question of "order." Repetition of that phrase must simply be the result of a highly successful public relations campaign.There is nothing new about a mighty military power utterly vanquishing a weaker power.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | May 27, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - After Newsweek's retraction of its Quran desecration story, some conservative media know exactly why this error occurred. "The press corps suffers from its own Vietnam syndrome," proclaimed The Wall Street Journal's editorial page. "This is part of a basic media mistrust of the military that goes back to Vietnam and has shown itself with a vengeance during the Iraq conflict and the war on terror." Conservative columnists and talk shows accuse the media of undermining the troops.
NEWS
By Tom Wicker | August 9, 1991
NEW YORK -- AFTER QUICK military victory in the desert war, President Bush exulted that the nation had "kicked the Vietnam syndrome" -- its supposed reluctance, after defeat in Indochina, to send U.S. troops to fight elsewhere in the world. Did that conviction embolden Bush to embark on military intervention against the Shining Path in Peru?Or have presidents suffered more, and for longer, from what might be called "the Peru syndrome" -- the idea that U.S. forces are required, and can prevail, anywhere U.S. interests appear to be threatened, or might be advanced?
NEWS
By The Providence (R.I.) Sunday Journal | March 19, 1991
TRUE TO his gentleman's code, President Bush refrained from gloating the other evening as he stood before Congress, and listened and watched as wave after wave of applause washed over him, and standing ovations greeted various phrases in his half-hour speech.The president certainly had reason to feel gratified.Yet it is worth noting that humility, as much as pride, was the note that the president repeatedly struck last Wednesday evening.This tells us a lot about George Bush as well. The president would be foolish to waste the political capital he has accumulated, but it is evident that Bush does not expect to settle scores or cause havoc or seek vengeance in the capital.
NEWS
March 15, 1991
"By God," President Bush declared after the Persian Gulf War was won, "we have kicked the Vietnam syndrome."Many interpretations may be put on this statement, but generally the president was taken to mean that 17 years after a humiliating defeat in Vietnam, America had banished self-doubt and emerged once again as the self-confident colossus of the globe. Margaret Thatcher, visiting America last week, verified this belief by declaring that Bush got it right when he said the United States is the sole nation which has both the moral authority and the military wherewithal to make the world's miscreants behave.
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