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By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
For sale: painstakingly restored Vietnam War-era Marine helicopter. Records missing, but mounts, gun replicas and rocket pods included. The blades spin, but the 1965 UH-1E Huey gunship is not flyable. To view, visit Cevon McLean's backyard in Lothian. "Everyone said, 'Why'd you buy that?'" McLean said. "Well, because I could. " Last month, McLean posted the "pinnacle" of his collection on Craigslist for $175,000. So far, a man has offered to trade him a Learjet for McLean's piece of military history.
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By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Joseph F. Nawrozki III, a retired investigative reporter who served on the staff of three Baltimore daily newspapers and was a Vietnam War combat veteran, died of leukemia Saturday at his Bel Air home. He was 70. "Joe had a real instinct for the underdog. He looked into their hearts," said Michael Olesker, a former Baltimore Sun columnist who was Mr. Nawrozki's investigative partner at the old News American. "His working-class background and his experience in Vietnam informed everything he wrote.
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NEWS
June 22, 2005
THIRTY YEARS after the fall of Saigon and a decade after ties resumed between the United States and Vietnam, the prime minister of America's former enemy met yesterday with President Bush. Earlier this week, Phan Van Khai paid other important calls - on a Boeing aircraft plant and Microsoft's Bill Gates in Seattle. Tomorrow, he's expected to be on Wall Street to ring the ceremonial bell opening trading on the New York Stock Exchange. And then he's off to Harvard and MIT. The message, of course, is that the Socialist Republic of Vietnam is eager for more investment and technology from the United States, its largest trading partner.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The photos of author Robert Timberg in recent years aren't as horrifying as his memoir leads readers to expect. His eyes are direct and unflinching, and his mouth expresses wry amusement. He has the kind of wrinkles normally found on a 74-year-old man and a patch of skin across his nose that at a casual glance appears sunburned. There's nothing about Timberg's appearance now that could be described as freakish, nothing that would cause young children to howl in fright. It's taken Timberg more than 35 operations - including one without anesthesia - and 47 years to achieve that face, and he's still not entirely reconciled to it. There are moments even now when he looks in the mirror and is first startled, then furious.
NEWS
By MICHAEL R. LEVENE | March 4, 1991
Theirs was fought in a dry, brown place. Mine was fought in a wet, green one.FTC Theirs began with a rapid buildup. Mine grew incrementally, over a period of years.They were volunteers. I was not.Yet many comparisons are being drawn between their war, in the Persian Gulf, and mine, in Vietnam. Some seem far-fetched, some on the money. But two in particular run so against the grain of my experience that I have long suspected they are in large part myth.In September of 1969, only days removed from my two years as an Army draftee, half of that time in Vietnam, I returned to the campus where I had not quite acquired a bachelor's degree.
NEWS
May 15, 1991
A 240-foot replica of Washington's Vietnam War Memorial will be on display June 14-16 at Meadowridge Memorial Park in Elkridge.The replica, constructed by the Habitat company from Tempe, Ariz., has a simulated black granite surface containing the more than 58,000 names of soldiers from the original wall.Activities, including a reading of names of local servicemen, memorial ceremonies, honor guards, as well as time for name-etching, arescheduled during the three-day event.The "Vietnam Wall Experience" is sponsored by a variety of volunteers, active duty and retired military personnel, veterans organizations, civic and citizens groups,and park employees.
NEWS
June 15, 2014
No one should be surprised at what's happening in Iraq ("Obama weighing action in Iraq: Militants' sweep toward Baghdad threatens to embroil region," June 13). Saddam Hussein was a Sunni Muslim, the minority sect in Iraq. He was cruel to the majority Shiites and kept a handle on them. When we killed him, it destroyed the balance of power. If former President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney were smart, they would have realized this. Now we are suffering the consequences.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 4, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton dropped a 19-year trade embargo against Vietnam yesterday in a major step toward reconciliation with the United States' old Cold War nemesis.The action, sought by U.S. companies eager for trade and investment ties with the poor but resource-rich Southeast Asian nation, moved the United States closer to normal relations with Vietnam. Already, banks, law firms, cigarette companies and other businesses have obtained licenses to open offices in Vietnam. Now, each nation will set up a liaison office in the other.
NEWS
July 11, 1995
Resumption of full diplomatic relations with Vietnam, which President Clinton is expected to announce this afternoon, will fulfill the road map of reconciliation that the Bush administration drew with that country's regime in 1991.The carefully orchestrated normalization began with the opening of a U.S. office in Hanoi that year, to seek information on servicemen missing in action from the Vietnam war. President Bush eased the embargo to permit humanitarian sales. Before leaving office, he allowed U.S. companies to open offices in Vietnam and do feasibility studies.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | April 24, 1994
The local Vietnam Veterans of America group wants the state to rename the eight-mile stretch of Route 24 from Aberdeen Proving Ground to the U.S. 1 bypass the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Parkway and to allow the construction of a privately funded monument at one end of the route.Members of Northeastern Maryland Chapter 588 appeared before the Harford County Council on Tuesday seeking a resolution urging the state Department of Transportation and the Maryland Transportation Commission to approve the proposal.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Robert W. Weinhold Sr., a decorated Army Airborne Ranger in the Vietnam War who later worked for several financial institutions, died Monday at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center of kidney failure. He was 75. The son of Herman W. Weinhold, a textile millworker, and Mary Alice Weinhold, a homemaker, Robert Winway Weinhold was born and raised in Methuen, Mass., where he graduated in 1956 from Methuen High School. He enrolled at Norwich University in Northfield, Vt., where he was captain and quarterback for the university's football team.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Hundreds of mourners bid farewell Thursday to Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene, the highest-ranking Army officer killed in combat since the Vietnam War. General Greene, a former leader at Aberdeen Proving Ground who was shot to death last week in Afghanistan, was laid to rest during a somber ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery. His wife, retired Col. Sue Myers, and their son, Lt. Matthew J. Greene, saluted his flag-draped coffin as a howitzer fired a 13-gun salute. The burial followed a private memorial service attended by 800 mourners, many in uniform, at Joint Base Myers-Henderson Hall.
NEWS
June 15, 2014
No one should be surprised at what's happening in Iraq ("Obama weighing action in Iraq: Militants' sweep toward Baghdad threatens to embroil region," June 13). Saddam Hussein was a Sunni Muslim, the minority sect in Iraq. He was cruel to the majority Shiites and kept a handle on them. When we killed him, it destroyed the balance of power. If former President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney were smart, they would have realized this. Now we are suffering the consequences.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Franklin Waters "Buck" Trapnell Jr., a retired Army colonel who served in Vietnam, died of a heart attack May 31 while visiting family near Richmond, Va. The former Roland Park resident was 77. Born in Baltimore and raised on Lake Avenue in Cedarcroft, he was the son of Franklin Waters Trapnell, an attorney who became an Office of Strategic Services and Central Intelligence Agency officer. His mother was Emily Willson Rieman Smith, a homemaker and volunteer. According to an autobiographical sketch, he spent much of his youth in Berlin, Germany, and Vienna, Austria, after World War II during the military occupation.
NEWS
June 10, 2014
I served 24 years in the United States Army, 21 of them in Special Forces, and I fought in two combat campaigns, El Salvador and Operation Iraqi Freedom. Command Sgt. Major Dan Pitzer, a former prisoner of war in Vietnam and later a senior civilian instructor for the Army's SERE school was a close friend of mine. He shared many experiences with me about his four years as a captive of the Viet Cong. Unlike Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, Sergeant Pitzer did not "walk away" from his unit and actively seek refuge with the enemy ( "Bergdahl is free, but at what cost," June 9)
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
Truc Thi Ly Nguyen was learning English and studying for her driver's license. Everyone drove in the United States, so the Vietnamese immigrant told others she wanted to, as well. She worked at T&T Nails, an East Baltimore salon across from a chicken shack and a tax shop. Manicures with color gel finishes sell for $20, according to a sign tacked to the wall near a Safe Streets poster admonishing people to "Stop shooting, start living. " On Monday, Nguyen was crouched at the foot basin of a man receiving a pedicure, when a man walked in, aimed a gun at the seated customer, exchanged words and fired repeatedly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Asher and By James Asher,Sun Staff | October 14, 2001
Lost Soliders, by James Webb. Bantam. 367 pages. $25. Thank you, James Webb. Your newest book, Lost Soldiers, is terrific. Lost Soldiers is, of course, about Vietnam. Not the Vietnam of back then. Not the booby traps, the napalm or the carpet bombs. But the Vietnam of now, the nation still living with the ghosts of so many dead. Reconstructed, reunited and pursuing a future for its people, the Vietnam Webb describes is seductive, seeking its own political and economic version of progress.
NEWS
By Ernest B. Furgurson | October 21, 1990
Washington--Fifteen years after the fall of Berlin in 1945, the United States counted West Germany as its most important ally in NATO. Fifteen years after the surrender ceremonies aboard the U.S.S. Missouri in Tokyo Bay, we were economically, diplomatically and militarily linked to Japan.But fifteen years after North Vietnamese troops took Saigon, 17 years after U.S. troops ended their active role there, we still have no formal relations with Vietnam.There are many reasons why, none so difficult that it would block normalization with any major country.
ENTERTAINMENT
Denise Weiss and For The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Welcome to my Episode 5 recapo. We are in Vietnam, and Juan Pablo sails down a river that looks like a cesspool while he reflects upon his "adventura. " “I've got 11 girls left,” he says, promising that he will keep his eyes open and focus on the ladies he hasn't spent much time with. The ladies "ooohh" and "ahhhh" as they check into their hotel. Nikki admits she was the cause of some tension last week; she hopes to put it all behind her, but desperately wants a one-on-one date.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
Virginia Bates, a poet and artist who opposed the Vietnam War and was a founder of the Howard County Peace Action Community, died of complications from the flu Dec. 9 at Bridgepoint of Los Altos, an assisted-living facility in California. The former Woodbine resident was 88. Virginia Neumann was born in Baltimore. She was the daughter of William Neumann, a plumber, and Elinor Neumann, a homemaker. She was a 1942 graduate of Western High School and earned a degree in literature from Case-Western Reserve University in Cleveland.
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