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By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 2, 1992
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. -- The right hand trembles, so he has to drink his Pepsi with both hands. Controlling his vision has become maddening. And when he stands, his legs quiver as if he were going to fall to the floor.In another time, Carlos Norman Hathcock II was the ultimate terminator. As a sniper for the U.S. Marine Corps in Vietnam -- when the hands were rock steady, the eyes keen, the legs durable -- he was officially credited with killing 93 North Vietnamese and Viet Cong. No sniper killed more people in the 216-year history of the Marines.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Franklin Waters "Buck" Trapnell Jr., a retired Army colonel who served in Vietnam, died of a heart attack May 31 while visiting family near Richmond, Va. The former Roland Park resident was 77. Born in Baltimore and raised on Lake Avenue in Cedarcroft, he was the son of Franklin Waters Trapnell, an attorney who became an Office of Strategic Services and Central Intelligence Agency officer. His mother was Emily Willson Rieman Smith, a homemaker and volunteer. According to an autobiographical sketch, he spent much of his youth in Berlin, Germany, and Vienna, Austria, after World War II during the military occupation.
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By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2001
In the fall of 1969 in Bing Duong province of Vietnam, a North Vietnamese soldier sat at a table in a large underground tunnel, taking notes. "Do you know about the heavy artillery warning yet?" he scribbled in English as an American soldier's voice crackled over his radio. "Negative," another American responded. "The coordinates are 550 600, 3/5/31 until 1130 hours," the first soldier said. In the margin, the North Vietnamese soldier wrote "heavy artillery = B52 Strike, at [11:30 a.m.]"
NEWS
By Ron Smith | December 4, 2009
Did you see the looks on the faces of the West Point cadets Tuesday night as President Barack Obama promised them a future of intensified war in Central Asia? They didn't seem thrilled, even as their commander-in-chief reminded them they volunteered for service. Applause was scarce and tepid. That was the only good thing about this occasion. As predicted, the strategy - a troop surge in Afghanistan - laid out in this long-anticipated speech was one of compromise, deception and self-delusion, delivered with all the man's oratorical flair, but as empty at its core as any political speech I have ever watched or listened to. We are supposed to believe him when he says we will exit Afghanistan by sending 30,000 more soldiers and Marines there, by becoming more involved in its affairs and those of neighboring Pakistan, and that we will be able to begin some disengagement within a year and a half.
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By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1999
WESTMINSTER, Calif. -- In this heart of Little Saigon, Southern California's Vietnamese community, a video store owner is insisting on his First Amendment rights to display the flag of the Viet Cong and a poster of the late dictator Ho Chi Minh. That has enraged members of the community, most of them refugees who fled Vietnam after the fall of Saigon in 1975. They say they have rights, too: to stop the flaunting of such painful reminders of the Vietnam War and the Communist government that rules their homeland.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | May 2, 2001
FORMER Nebraska Sen. Bob Kerrey recently confessed that when he commanded a Navy SEAL team 32 years ago during the Vietnam War, his unit killed unarmed women and children. Kerrey's revelation came at the same time that New York City police exonerated the four officers who shot Amadou Diallo to death. Yes, there is a connection. I could go off on the standard diatribe against "white supremacy" so common among black race-baiters these days. You know it: the one that says both incidents show how white folks devalue the lives of nonwhites and how in both cases a bunch of white guys got away with murdering "people of color," the politically correct phrase these days.
NEWS
By S. M. Khalid | July 16, 1991
A disabled Vietnam veteran who built an authentic Viet Cong village in the back yard of his Northeast Baltimore home surrendered early yesterday to police negotiators and SWAT officers who had been called on reports of disorderly conduct after holding them off for more than three hours.Dennis Alvez, 43, of the 4600 block of Moravia Road, was depressed from learning he has cancer rather than suffering from Vietnam flashbacks, said police negotiator Lt. Samuel Tress. Police were called to the home after reports of disorderly conduct.
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By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1996
Harry S. Freedman, 53, formerly of Pimlico, a decorated Vietnam War fighter pilot who later flew for Eastern Airlines, died Friday of a massive heart attack at his home in Stone Mountain, Ga.Mr. Freedman was born in Baltimore and was a 1959 graduate of City College.As a member of the 612th Tactical Fighter Squadron, the Screaming Eagles, Mr. Freedman flew scores of missions in F-100 Supersabres over South Vietnam and across the border into Laos in 1966 and 1967 in support of American and South Vietnamese ground troops and bombing Viet Cong and North Vietnamese bases.
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By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2001
Sweltering and gripped with fear, 19-year-old Marine Rob Coughlin slithered on his belly with a flashlight and semi-automatic pistol through one of Vietnam's underground tunnels when he came face to face with his worst nightmare - a deadly bamboo viper. "I was afraid to move a muscle but I was shaking so," said Coughlin, a member of an earlier generation of American "tunnel rats" - troops with the mission of scouring subterranean labyrinths in Vietnam for the enemy. When he made it back above ground, Coughlin slammed his tunnel gear to the ground and told his sergeant that this unnerving crawl was his last.
NEWS
May 7, 1996
SPY THRILLER fanatics will be deprived of many a fantasy now that the body of former CIA William E. Colby, 76, has been found in the waters off his Charles County home, apparently the victim not of foul play but of the foul weather that capsized his canoe April 27. Viet Cong veterans will not claim revenge; CIA ultras will not feel he got his come-uppance; old Kremlin agents will not be under suspicion.In his career of espionage and intelligence that spanned more than half a century, Mr. Colby made plenty of enemies -- a fact that heightened conjecture during the nine days of his disappearance.
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By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2005
Retired Marine Sgt. Maj. Cornelius Dorsey remembers how the coming of a quiet morning over South Vietnam suddenly got thrown into reverse. Everything grew dark and noisy: As the Baltimore native looked overhead, a swarm of incoming American helicopters and jets stretched as far as he could see, steadily blotting out the sky. "It was like a swarm of bees. I never saw so many helicopters," said Dorsey, 69, reflecting on the morning of Aug. 18, 1965, and his role in the initial stages of Operation Starlite, the first major battle of the Vietnam War. Back then, Dorsey was part of a mortar unit that formed a wall to block Viet Cong troops from escaping an assault of American ground, air and sea forces.
NEWS
By Myrna Oliver and Myrna Oliver,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 2004
Eddie Adams, whose Pulitzer Prize-winning photo of a Vietnamese officer executing a Viet Cong prisoner in the streets of Saigon became an enduring symbol of the brutality of the Vietnam War, died yesterday in his New York home. He was 71. Mr. Adams died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, known as Lou Gehrig's disease, his assistant, Jessica Stuart, told the Associated Press. In May, he received a diagnosis of a rapid strain of the incurable neurological disorder and quickly lost his speech and became increasingly incapacitated.
NEWS
August 8, 2004
FROM A TACTICAL standpoint, it makes some sense for backers of President Bush to run campaign ads questioning the military heroism of Democratic challenger John Kerry. The comfort level Americans feel with Mr. Bush as their commander in chief is currently his greatest advantage over Senator Kerry in the presidential campaign. President Bush can't afford to let Mr. Kerry succeed in his drive to use his decorated wartime service to neutralize that advantage. Even if the claims of the anti-Kerry veterans featured in one ad are "dishonest and dishonorable," as Republican Sen. John McCain charged, they raise questions that inevitably make the challenger's job of winning voter confidence more difficult.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | April 29, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Critics of Sen. John Kerry may be barking up the wrong tree when they attack his record in Vietnam, especially when they question whether he deserved the three Purple Hearts he was awarded. The putative Democratic presidential nominee has made his Vietnam service the centerpiece of his political biography, touting his bravery in combat and, most recently, attacking President Bush, "who can't even show or prove that he showed up for duty in the National Guard." But Mr. Kerry's problem isn't whether he deserved the medals he was awarded.
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By Kevin Cowherd | April 15, 2004
THERE ARE 125 million people over the age of 40 in this country, and if they turn on the 11 o'clock news and watch the fighting in Baghdad and the helicopters circling Fallujah and don't see Vietnam, then we have the worst case of collective amnesia in the history of mankind. U.S. troops fighting a guerrilla war in a far-off land, Americans divided on whether they should be there at all, presidents and generals smiling and telling us everything's going great while the body-count goes up, nobody in the White House or the Pentagon with a clue about how to get the hell out - this doesn't sound vaguely familiar?
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | April 9, 2004
WASHINGTON -- We are at a perilous juncture in Iraq. Two things are clear, and there's only one question left to be answered. What's clear is that there are no weapons of mass destruction in Iraq and there are no Viet Cong in Iraq. The key unanswered question is: Are there any Iraqis in Iraq? Is there a critical mass ready to identify themselves not as Shiites, Kurds and Sunnis, but as Iraqis, who are ready to fight for the chance of self-determination for the Iraqi people as a whole? When I say that there are no Viet Cong in Iraq, I mean that the Iraqi "insurgents" opposing the United States today cannot plausibly claim to be the authentic expressions of Iraqi nationalism -- as the Viet Cong claimed to be in the Vietnam War. The forces killing Americans and Iraqi police are primarily Sunni Muslims who want to restore the rule and privileges of their minority community and Baath Party, or foreign and local Islamists who are trying to undermine any prospect of modernism, pluralism and secularism in Iraq.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | April 9, 2004
WASHINGTON -- We are at a perilous juncture in Iraq. Two things are clear, and there's only one question left to be answered. What's clear is that there are no weapons of mass destruction in Iraq and there are no Viet Cong in Iraq. The key unanswered question is: Are there any Iraqis in Iraq? Is there a critical mass ready to identify themselves not as Shiites, Kurds and Sunnis, but as Iraqis, who are ready to fight for the chance of self-determination for the Iraqi people as a whole? When I say that there are no Viet Cong in Iraq, I mean that the Iraqi "insurgents" opposing the United States today cannot plausibly claim to be the authentic expressions of Iraqi nationalism -- as the Viet Cong claimed to be in the Vietnam War. The forces killing Americans and Iraqi police are primarily Sunni Muslims who want to restore the rule and privileges of their minority community and Baath Party, or foreign and local Islamists who are trying to undermine any prospect of modernism, pluralism and secularism in Iraq.
NEWS
By ADAM PIORE and ADAM PIORE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 1999
CU CHI, Vietnam -- Camera-toting foreigners and young tour guides now occupy the dark tunnels of this old Viet Cong stronghold where "hero American-killers" once planned ambushes and hunkered down while American B-52 bombers attacked from the sky.But Vo Van Nam, 80, hasn't forgotten the way it used to be.From his modest farm down the road, the frail old man with the white Ho Chi Minh beard sometimes visits this place where he helped tend the wounded, and...
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2004
New wars come and go and young men die anew and the warriors who survive recall the battles of their youth. Robert Tonsetic remembers Vietnam. Bob Tonsetic served 27 years in the Army, in a career that took him from Vietnam to Germany to Alaska to the NATO Defense College in Rome. But he's written his first book about the six months in 1968 when he commanded Charlie Company, Fourth Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 199th Light Infantry Brigade. The combat infantrymen of the 12th Infantry had been called Warriors since the Indian wars of the 19th century.
NEWS
By Gordon Livingston | November 28, 2003
BAGHDAD (Nov. 21) - More than a dozen rockets fired from donkey carts slammed into Iraq's Oil Ministry and two hotels Friday - attacks dismissed by a U.S. general as "militarily insignificant" but which also exposed weaknesses gathering intelligence on insurgents."
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