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NEWS
By Steve Chapman | June 28, 2001
CHICAGO - If a sailor you know has been looking morose, it's not hard to guess why. During last year's campaign, George W. Bush made a solemn vow to upgrade our military readiness, which he accused the Clinton administration of grossly neglecting. But in one of his first major decisions, Mr. Bush ordered the Pentagon to stop using the Puerto Rican island of Vieques for critical training operations. "My attitude is that the Navy ought to find somewhere else to conduct its exercises," he said, causing great dissatisfaction in the Navy.
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TRAVEL
By Reed Johnson and Reed Johnson,Los Angeles Times | February 15, 2004
For 62 years, the U.S. Navy's hulking presence kept Vieques, a Puerto Rican tropical idyll, frozen in a Cold War time warp. During those decades when the military used Vieques' beaches for bombing practice, this serenely beautiful, 21-mile-long island off Puerto Rico's east coast saw only a few thousand visitors a year, mostly harried urbanites seeking a respite from noisy, crowded San Juan. Paradoxically, the Navy preserved the beauty of Vieques for posterity. Now the Navy is gone, driven away by protests after a fighter jet missed its target and a stray bomb killed a local civilian in 1999.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 19, 1999
WASHINGTON -- With U.S. and Puerto Rican officials deadlocked on the fate of the Vieques bombing range and time running out, the Navy is preparing to use the mainland to practice amphibious landings and aircraft bombing runs, Pentagon sources said yesterday.Under the plan, the battle group of the USS Eisenhower, which was to train on the Puerto Rican island of Vieques during the first week of December, would instead use two ranges in Florida for aircraft bombing practice and Camp Lejeune, N.C., for amphibious landings.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | January 24, 2002
VIEQUES, Puerto Rico - In the shade of a banana tree, they swayed to Lee Greenwood's anthem "God Bless the USA" ringing out from a powerful sound system. American flags fluttered in the gentle breeze, and in the center of town, the days of thunderous protest over military bombing exercises seemed a remote memory. "There were those who burned flags and yelled, `Yankee, go home,' but no more," said state Sen. Miriam Ramirez at a rally Sunday in support of the Navy's occupation of this island's eastern flank.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 5, 2001
WASHINGTON - Prominent Democrats such as Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, Robert F. Kennedy Jr. and former Gov. Mario M. Cuomo of New York have helped lead the charge against the Navy's bombing exercises on the Puerto Rican island of Vieques. But behind the scenes the national party is bitterly divided over the issue. Moderate and conservative Democrats from around the country are beginning to complain that the party, under pressure from its liberal wing, has gone too far in trying to stop the training operations.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | January 24, 2002
VIEQUES, Puerto Rico - In the shade of a banana tree, they swayed to Lee Greenwood's anthem "God Bless the USA" ringing out from a powerful sound system. American flags fluttered in the gentle breeze, and in the center of town, the days of thunderous protest over military bombing exercises seemed a remote memory. "There were those who burned flags and yelled, `Yankee, go home,' but no more," said state Sen. Miriam Ramirez at a rally Sunday in support of the Navy's occupation of this island's eastern flank.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton ordered the military yesterday to stop its live-fire exercises at a Puerto Rican bombing range that the Pentagon says is vital to combat-ready forces, and to end military training there within five years.Under Clinton's proposal, live-fire bombing could resume only if the residents of Vieques, who have demanded that the military leave, agree to it.The president said he will direct Defense Secretary William S. Cohen to work on a proposal for resuming live-fire training that would include a $40 million community development grant for the island.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Tom Bowman and Jonathan Weisman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 22, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton told his national security adviser in July that it was "wrong" for the Navy to continue using a bombing range in Puerto Rico that many island leaders want closed -- even though the president had just created an independent panel to determine the future of the 58-year-old range.In a handwritten note to his national security adviser, Samuel R. Berger, on July 26, the president signaled his support for a leading Puerto Rican activist who had urged Clinton to abandon the range on Vieques Island.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 25, 2001
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - The Puerto Rican government sued the U.S. Navy and Pentagon yesterday in an effort to block military training this weekend on Vieques. It was the first step in this week's long-awaited confrontation over bombing on the target range. The lawsuit, filed in federal court in Washington, calls for the Navy to follow local environmental noise regulations that Gov. Sila Maria Calderon signed into law minutes before going to court. The rules prohibit sonic booms and noise levels generated by shelling during land, air and amphibious training.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 9, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Navy officials acknowledged last night that they were delaying the departure of a two-star admiral for Puerto Rico, citing the reluctance of island officials to resume talks on the future of a controversial bombing range.Rear Adm. Kevin Green had been due to arrive in Puerto Rico tomorrow to open discussions with leaders on the use of the Vieques bombing range for nonexplosive bombs.Green's appointment was a key part of a plan announced this week by President Clinton and Defense Secretary William S. Cohen.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 5, 2001
WASHINGTON - Prominent Democrats such as Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, Robert F. Kennedy Jr. and former Gov. Mario M. Cuomo of New York have helped lead the charge against the Navy's bombing exercises on the Puerto Rican island of Vieques. But behind the scenes the national party is bitterly divided over the issue. Moderate and conservative Democrats from around the country are beginning to complain that the party, under pressure from its liberal wing, has gone too far in trying to stop the training operations.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | June 28, 2001
CHICAGO - If a sailor you know has been looking morose, it's not hard to guess why. During last year's campaign, George W. Bush made a solemn vow to upgrade our military readiness, which he accused the Clinton administration of grossly neglecting. But in one of his first major decisions, Mr. Bush ordered the Pentagon to stop using the Puerto Rican island of Vieques for critical training operations. "My attitude is that the Navy ought to find somewhere else to conduct its exercises," he said, causing great dissatisfaction in the Navy.
NEWS
June 16, 2001
PROBABLY NO one thought George W. Bush's election as president would doom the U.S. Navy's use of Vieques Island for target practice. The military, most Republicans and Puerto Rican demonstrators expected the opposite. President Bush's decision that the Navy go elsewhere within two years is cheering to many Puerto Rican citizens of the United States who found the bombardment of the island a relic of colonialism. It is welcome to the fewer than 10,000 persons, many of them fishermen, many of them hearing-impaired from years of bombardment, who live on Vieques, which is east of Puerto Rico but within the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 14, 2001
WASHINGTON - The Navy intends to halt training on the Puerto Rican island of Vieques by May 2003, reversing its long-running insistence that no other locale was suitable for battle simulations, defense officials said last night. Navy Secretary Gordon England plans to set up a commission as early as today to search for alternatives. A defense official cautioned that the Navy would leave only if acceptable alternatives can be found. But the Navy believes it will find those alternatives, which could range from another location for live-fire training, or simulation.
TOPIC
By Sheryl McCarthy | June 10, 2001
Al Sharpton had been in jail for only 16 days but, according to my unofficial estimate, the New York City press corps had done 6,487 stories about his incarceration. The headlines -- since his arrest May 23 for trespassing on Navy land on Puerto Rico's Vieques Island -- have gone something like this: "Sharpton and Three Others Jailed for Vieques Protest" "Supporters Hold `Free Sharpton' Rally at Jail" "Sharpton Announces Hunger Strike: Won't Eat Until Bombing Stops or Until He's Freed" "Sharpton's Typical Jail Day: Up by 5, in TV Room by 6" "Sharpton Weeps: Overcome With Angst Over Plight of Vieques Victims, Says He's More Serious Than Ever About Presidential Run" "Sharpton Denied Bail" "Sharpton to Renew Wedding Vows in Prison" "Sharpton Refuses to Renew Vows in Prison" "Says He's Fasting, Not on Hunger Strike: Announces Liquid Diet" "Sharpton Mom Visits: Urges Him to Eat Soup" "Sharpton Says He'll Eat Soup" This is what our obsession with Al Sharpton has come to: Every mood change, every change in eating habits, every new celebrity visitor and every new pronouncement by this canny showman gets a headline.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 25, 2001
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - The Puerto Rican government sued the U.S. Navy and Pentagon yesterday in an effort to block military training this weekend on Vieques. It was the first step in this week's long-awaited confrontation over bombing on the target range. The lawsuit, filed in federal court in Washington, calls for the Navy to follow local environmental noise regulations that Gov. Sila Maria Calderon signed into law minutes before going to court. The rules prohibit sonic booms and noise levels generated by shelling during land, air and amphibious training.
NEWS
June 16, 2001
PROBABLY NO one thought George W. Bush's election as president would doom the U.S. Navy's use of Vieques Island for target practice. The military, most Republicans and Puerto Rican demonstrators expected the opposite. President Bush's decision that the Navy go elsewhere within two years is cheering to many Puerto Rican citizens of the United States who found the bombardment of the island a relic of colonialism. It is welcome to the fewer than 10,000 persons, many of them fishermen, many of them hearing-impaired from years of bombardment, who live on Vieques, which is east of Puerto Rico but within the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.
NEWS
May 4, 2000
THE VIEQUES problem was solved in January. The Vieques crisis is something else -- real, unnecessary and irrelevant -- brought to a head by steely determination on both sides to have a showdown. The Jan. 31 agreement between President Clinton and Gov. Pedro J. Rossello of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico provides for a referendum of the 9,300 residents of Vieques on whether the eastern half of the small island may remain in use as a firing range for the U.S. Navy. There is an aid incentive to vote yes, but a likelihood the majority will vote no. If so, the Navy must clean up its range and end training by May 2003.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 21, 2001
WASHINGTON - In his last hours in office, President Clinton ordered the Defense Department to examine a new study that shows a high incidence of heart problems among the residents of Vieques, Puerto Rico, where the Navy has held bombing exercises for 50 years. Gov. Sila M. Calderon of Puerto Rico asked the president last week to order an immediate halt to the bombing, based on the preliminary findings of the study, which blamed the noise from huge exercises for a high rate of symptoms of an unusual disorder known as vibroacoustic disease.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | May 5, 2000
The Vieques demo was really about jump-starting the independence movement which no Puerto Ricans support. Didn't work. $200,000 or $10,000 for each month of loyal service is not bad severance, even in Columbia. Only London could elect Ken Livingstone. He is too kooky left for Beijing. All Norris has to do is reduce the shootings of Afro teens by other Afro teens and cops. He says he knows how.
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