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SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
Secretariat's legend hardly needs bolstering. But, his supporters feel, the race he ran on the third Saturday in May at Pimlico back in 1973 does require revisiting. The Maryland Racing Commission agrees, and will consider a proposal to change Secretariat's Preakness time during its meeting next week. At issue is whether the colt had set a track record - as he had already done at the Kentucky Derby and would do at the Belmont. While hardcore racing fans have long felt that the strapping chestnut colt did, indeed, run the fastest Preakness to date, supporters - including owner Penny Chenery and Maryland Jockey Club president Tom Chuckas - are seeking to have the record officially changed as the 40th anniversary of his Triple Crown win nears.
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SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | January 18, 2014
Now that Major League Baseball has been dragged kicking and screaming into the 21st century, we can all take comfort in the fact that truth, justice and the National Pastime will forever be protected by modern video technology. Don't misunderstand the sarcastic tone. The decision to dramatically expand the use of video replay to reverse bad umpire rulings is the correct one for our time. There's no reason to let bad calls stand when there is an almost foolproof way to replace them with good ones.
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BUSINESS
By TANYA JONES and TANYA JONES,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1995
Marylanders will have a chance to talk face to face with their legislators tomorrow night in the state's first video town meeting.State delegates and senators in four locations around the state will lead the meeting, where people in one room can see, hear and speak to those in three other rooms miles away using a network of video cameras, monitors, microphones and fiber-optic cable.Legislators and residents will gather in video-equipped rooms in Owings Mills, Aberdeen, Rockville and Salisbury at 7 p.m. tomorrow in a discussion on Maryland's economic development and job creation.
NEWS
By Graham Dodge | December 2, 2013
In 1998, I had a start-up called NotFilms.com that provided an online platform for home videos.  At that time, online video was the size of a matchbook and very few people had a broadband connection capable of uploading video (let alone watching it), so users sent us their VHS tapes and DVDs via snail mail for us to digitize/encode it in glorious Quicktime, RealPlayer and Windows Media Player formats.  This was obviously a barrier to entry, and the start-up failed along with numerous others during that early dot-com era.  It wasn't until broadband was more widely adopted that a little website called YouTube was then able to succeed at what we had attempted seven years prior.  Broadband has since enabled the success of many streaming video sites and apps.  Its importance cannot be overstated, but today broadband is mostly taken for granted, and may seem less obvious to some in its enabling of other technologies.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1997
Forget scratchy fight songs booming from a tower of speakers and a black-and-white scoreboard endlessly flickering downs, points and timeouts remaining.The $220 million Ravens stadium being built downtown is incorporating audio and video technology so cutting-edge that its planners say it will revolutionize the fan experience with animated graphics, multiple replay screens, computer-synchronized speakers -- and perhaps even a Barry Levinson film short.More than $10 million in specialized electronics will give controllers the ability to re-create the effect of a thundering squadron of jets swooping through the seating bowl, entering at one end zone and exiting at the opposite.
NEWS
By Graham Dodge | December 2, 2013
In 1998, I had a start-up called NotFilms.com that provided an online platform for home videos.  At that time, online video was the size of a matchbook and very few people had a broadband connection capable of uploading video (let alone watching it), so users sent us their VHS tapes and DVDs via snail mail for us to digitize/encode it in glorious Quicktime, RealPlayer and Windows Media Player formats.  This was obviously a barrier to entry, and the start-up failed along with numerous others during that early dot-com era.  It wasn't until broadband was more widely adopted that a little website called YouTube was then able to succeed at what we had attempted seven years prior.  Broadband has since enabled the success of many streaming video sites and apps.  Its importance cannot be overstated, but today broadband is mostly taken for granted, and may seem less obvious to some in its enabling of other technologies.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 16, 1990
Washington--Think of it as "Star Trek" meets "Sesame Street," an educational voyage where no man has gone before: It's Tech World 2000's gallery of interactive technology.Since opening in February at the Techworld Plaza in Washington, Tech 2000 has provided a glimpse into the future of computer technology. The permanent display features more than exhibits aimed at demonstrating how the marriage of the computer and video technology is changing the way America learns, entertains, communicates and runs its businesses.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | December 30, 2010
Nobody gets a shiny new bike for Christmas anymore. They get a video game version of the Tour de France. Nobody gets a sweater or a shirt or a tie these days. They get an iPhone, an iPad, a Kindle or Xbox Kinect. And stockings are stuffed with controllers, headsets and AA batteries instead of candy. It was a high-tech holiday this year, and the grown-ups in my family were scrambling to keep up with the kids. We were faking that look of composure, the one we save for the self-checkout lines at Home Depot.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | January 18, 2014
Now that Major League Baseball has been dragged kicking and screaming into the 21st century, we can all take comfort in the fact that truth, justice and the National Pastime will forever be protected by modern video technology. Don't misunderstand the sarcastic tone. The decision to dramatically expand the use of video replay to reverse bad umpire rulings is the correct one for our time. There's no reason to let bad calls stand when there is an almost foolproof way to replace them with good ones.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1996
To hear Ed Goldberg tell it, he and his students at Carroll Community College are some of the first witnesses to the next wave of the computer revolution.They're getting an early look at a new computer video editing system that makes it possible to edit videotape on a computer screen, much like editing copy on a word processor.According to Mr. Goldberg, the technology, called nonlinear video editing, will eventually allow the average person to produce high quality videos using a computer, just as desktop publishing made it possible for anyone with a computer and the proper software to be a graphic designer.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
Secretariat's legend hardly needs bolstering. But, his supporters feel, the race he ran on the third Saturday in May at Pimlico back in 1973 does require revisiting. The Maryland Racing Commission agrees, and will consider a proposal to change Secretariat's Preakness time during its meeting next week. At issue is whether the colt had set a track record - as he had already done at the Kentucky Derby and would do at the Belmont. While hardcore racing fans have long felt that the strapping chestnut colt did, indeed, run the fastest Preakness to date, supporters - including owner Penny Chenery and Maryland Jockey Club president Tom Chuckas - are seeking to have the record officially changed as the 40th anniversary of his Triple Crown win nears.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | December 30, 2010
Nobody gets a shiny new bike for Christmas anymore. They get a video game version of the Tour de France. Nobody gets a sweater or a shirt or a tie these days. They get an iPhone, an iPad, a Kindle or Xbox Kinect. And stockings are stuffed with controllers, headsets and AA batteries instead of candy. It was a high-tech holiday this year, and the grown-ups in my family were scrambling to keep up with the kids. We were faking that look of composure, the one we save for the self-checkout lines at Home Depot.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | December 28, 2007
Baltimore County District Judge Marshall Alexander took the bench one recent afternoon for bail reviews. But instead of facing a line of suspects in jumpsuits handcuffed and shackled together in front of him, he looked out at two gigantic television screens and a state-of-the-art video camera. Baltimore County has started using a video conference system to conduct bail reviews, beaming live images of suspects from the county jail into the courthouse and vice versa. The new process has consolidated all of the county's bail hearings in a single courtroom in Towson -- instead of three courthouses -- and allows officials with pretrial services to conduct a more thorough review of an inmate's background for the judge who will decide whether to free the suspect.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2002
Most schools have a newsletter they send home periodically to parents. Some even post the newsletter online as part of the school's Web site. But a computer-savvy eighth-grader at Glenwood Middle School has found a way to combine the ubiquitous parent newsletter and the latest technology - sending the week's news and tidbits home on the Internet in an innovative and informative way. Joey Spurrier, 13, has developed an online video newscast that he...
BUSINESS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 10, 1999
CHICAGO -- Boys and girls, can you say "twisted pair"?You say you don't know what "twisted pair" means? You say you don't care?You say you glaze over during explanations of high-tech household features? Yes, I know. It's not that you don't recognize the potential benefits of having a house that's wired for the future; it's just that you'd be just as happy to be told, instead: "Plug it in here and go on with your life."Alas, the leaders of the Geek Chic movement take a certain pleasure in your inability to differentiate POTS from Category 5, LANS from RG-6 dual co-ax.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1997
Forget scratchy fight songs booming from a tower of speakers and a black-and-white scoreboard endlessly flickering downs, points and timeouts remaining.The $220 million Ravens stadium being built downtown is incorporating audio and video technology so cutting-edge that its planners say it will revolutionize the fan experience with animated graphics, multiple replay screens, computer-synchronized speakers -- and perhaps even a Barry Levinson film short.More than $10 million in specialized electronics will give controllers the ability to re-create the effect of a thundering squadron of jets swooping through the seating bowl, entering at one end zone and exiting at the opposite.
BUSINESS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 10, 1999
CHICAGO -- Boys and girls, can you say "twisted pair"?You say you don't know what "twisted pair" means? You say you don't care?You say you glaze over during explanations of high-tech household features? Yes, I know. It's not that you don't recognize the potential benefits of having a house that's wired for the future; it's just that you'd be just as happy to be told, instead: "Plug it in here and go on with your life."Alas, the leaders of the Geek Chic movement take a certain pleasure in your inability to differentiate POTS from Category 5, LANS from RG-6 dual co-ax.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | December 28, 2007
Baltimore County District Judge Marshall Alexander took the bench one recent afternoon for bail reviews. But instead of facing a line of suspects in jumpsuits handcuffed and shackled together in front of him, he looked out at two gigantic television screens and a state-of-the-art video camera. Baltimore County has started using a video conference system to conduct bail reviews, beaming live images of suspects from the county jail into the courthouse and vice versa. The new process has consolidated all of the county's bail hearings in a single courtroom in Towson -- instead of three courthouses -- and allows officials with pretrial services to conduct a more thorough review of an inmate's background for the judge who will decide whether to free the suspect.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1996
To hear Ed Goldberg tell it, he and his students at Carroll Community College are some of the first witnesses to the next wave of the computer revolution.They're getting an early look at a new computer video editing system that makes it possible to edit videotape on a computer screen, much like editing copy on a word processor.According to Mr. Goldberg, the technology, called nonlinear video editing, will eventually allow the average person to produce high quality videos using a computer, just as desktop publishing made it possible for anyone with a computer and the proper software to be a graphic designer.
BUSINESS
By TANYA JONES and TANYA JONES,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1995
Marylanders will have a chance to talk face to face with their legislators tomorrow night in the state's first video town meeting.State delegates and senators in four locations around the state will lead the meeting, where people in one room can see, hear and speak to those in three other rooms miles away using a network of video cameras, monitors, microphones and fiber-optic cable.Legislators and residents will gather in video-equipped rooms in Owings Mills, Aberdeen, Rockville and Salisbury at 7 p.m. tomorrow in a discussion on Maryland's economic development and job creation.
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