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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2010
When Sid Meier and a partner launched the video game design firm MicroProse in the early 1980s, the industry was still in its infancy. Today, Meier is widely regarded as the "godfather" of computer gaming. Based in Hunt Valley, MicroProse grew over the years to become a beacon to computer geeks who wanted to be part of the growing market of video games on personal computers. More than two decades later, Meier, 56, is still designing video games — his most famous is Civilization, a virtual empire-building game — for another company he helped found, Firaxis Games, in Hunt Valley.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Cassidy Sterling | March 11, 2014
Joel Haddock and Chris Klimas regularly have, what they call, a "date night. " No dinner. No movie. Nothing like that. To them, "date night" is working on a personal project - Twofold Secret, an independent gaming studio the two founded in 2010. It consists of huddling at the kitchen table at one of their homes, hammering out issues and planning a week-by-week game plan for whatever project they're working on. The co-founders met as undergraduates at Washington College in Chestertown when the two were neighbors in their college dorm, and discovered they both had an interest in games.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
Deb Tillett has been around the world, pursuing a career in technology that started a few decades ago in the suburbs of Baltimore. She learned the ropes of the video game world while working at one of the local companies - MicroProse - that gave birth to an industry that's now thriving in Hunt Valley and other parts of Baltimore County and Maryland. Earlier this year, she took over the helm at the Emerging Technology Center, Baltimore's main technology business incubator, after that organization's longtime head, Ann Lansinger, retired.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
Deb Tillett has been around the world, pursuing a career in technology that started a few decades ago in the suburbs of Baltimore. She learned the ropes of the video game world while working at one of the local companies - MicroProse - that gave birth to an industry that's now thriving in Hunt Valley and other parts of Baltimore County and Maryland. Earlier this year, she took over the helm at the Emerging Technology Center, Baltimore's main technology business incubator, after that organization's longtime head, Ann Lansinger, retired.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rachel Osterman and Rachel Osterman,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 25, 2003
Like many in her generation, Leslie Lund likes nothing more than all-night video game sessions in which she builds armies, destroys villages and shapes the future of the world. But the 20-year-old is also part of a little-known subgroup - women gamers. The Entertainment Software Association found that 26 percent of video game users are women over the age of 18, confirming what many "game girl" advocates have long argued: women love video games. At the same time, they say, game makers haven't acknowledged that players aren't just young or teen-age boys who want to shoot, terminate, and conquer their way to virtual victory while using female characters with unrealistic curves and tight clothes.
FEATURES
By Dallas Morning News | September 26, 1990
The kids are finally in bed. Sound asleep. Time to slip that Game Boy or that Nintendo controller out of those weary little hands. Time to play.For years, adults hooked on video games have had to resort to subterfuge, sneaking behind their children's backs to snatch a few hours of stolen pleasure on a borrowed Game Boy or Nintendo or Atari Lynx. Those who don't have children have had to buy their own video games, skulking around the aisles at Toys "R" Us among the bicycles and the Barbie Dolls.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 9, 2005
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has signed a bill that makes it illegal to sell or rent violent video games to minors in California. The signing of the bill Friday, authored by Assembly Speaker Pro Tem Leland Yee, shows how far the video game industry has fallen out of political favor in a few months. California joins Illinois and Michigan in passing an anti-violent video game bill in the past year, and similar bills have been proposed in just about every state, though the courts have found prior prohibitions unconstitutional.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2012
For more than four years, a team of 40 or so people in Sparks secretly worked for this Tuesday. In perhaps the biggest day in Firaxis Games' history, the design studio releases " XCOM: Enemy Unknown," a richly detailed and immersive video game that already has gotten rave reviews. Firaxis and its parent company, 2K Games of Novato, Calif., need all the buzz they can get. Firaxis wouldn't say how much it spent developing the game, but large releases typically cost tens of millions of dollars.
BUSINESS
By Alex Pham and Alex Pham,Los Angeles Times | March 1, 2008
SAN FRANCISCO -- James Silva is one of the amateurs changing how the $40 billion video game industry defines fun. The 26-year-old from Utica, N.Y., paid his way through college by scrubbing dishes at a diner. That job might help him become the Quentin Tarantino of video games: He used it as inspiration for The Dishwasher, in which the title character becomes a ninja and slashes his way out of a kitchen overrun by villains. Microsoft Corp. agreed to publish his stylized action game on the Xbox 360 console and highlighted it at the Game Developers Conference here recently.
NEWS
By Steven Bodzin and Alex Pham and Steven Bodzin and Alex Pham,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 15, 2005
WASHINGTON - Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, a New York Democrat, called yesterday for a federal investigation into a downloadable modification that turns the best-selling computer game Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas into an interactive pornographic movie. Clinton's comments are part of the latest skirmish in the continuing battle between the entertainment industry and those seeking to keep children away from programs with sexual and violent content. "We should all be deeply disturbed that a game which now permits the simulation of lewd sexual acts in an interactive format with highly realistic graphics has fallen into the hands of young people across the country," she said in a letter to the head of the Federal Trade Commission.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2012
For more than four years, a team of 40 or so people in Sparks secretly worked for this Tuesday. In perhaps the biggest day in Firaxis Games' history, the design studio releases " XCOM: Enemy Unknown," a richly detailed and immersive video game that already has gotten rave reviews. Firaxis and its parent company, 2K Games of Novato, Calif., need all the buzz they can get. Firaxis wouldn't say how much it spent developing the game, but large releases typically cost tens of millions of dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | July 13, 2012
"The future belongs to crowds. "  - Don DeLillo, Mao II If the 20th century version of video game marketing is attempting to observe what customers wanted, than the 21st has become a time about flat-out asking them. Steam, Valve's online gaming store and community hub, announced "Greenlight," a crowdsourcing-inspired move aimed at letting the users have more say in what games are available to buy and play on the service. "The community should be deciding what gets released," Valve announced.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2010
When Sid Meier and a partner launched the video game design firm MicroProse in the early 1980s, the industry was still in its infancy. Today, Meier is widely regarded as the "godfather" of computer gaming. Based in Hunt Valley, MicroProse grew over the years to become a beacon to computer geeks who wanted to be part of the growing market of video games on personal computers. More than two decades later, Meier, 56, is still designing video games — his most famous is Civilization, a virtual empire-building game — for another company he helped found, Firaxis Games, in Hunt Valley.
BUSINESS
By Alex Pham and Alex Pham,Los Angeles Times | March 1, 2008
SAN FRANCISCO -- James Silva is one of the amateurs changing how the $40 billion video game industry defines fun. The 26-year-old from Utica, N.Y., paid his way through college by scrubbing dishes at a diner. That job might help him become the Quentin Tarantino of video games: He used it as inspiration for The Dishwasher, in which the title character becomes a ninja and slashes his way out of a kitchen overrun by villains. Microsoft Corp. agreed to publish his stylized action game on the Xbox 360 console and highlighted it at the Game Developers Conference here recently.
BUSINESS
By TYEESHA DIXON and TYEESHA DIXON,SUN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
University of Baltimore student Brittany Steiner enrolled in a beginner's multimedia design class three years ago to fulfill a graduation requirement. She didn't know the course would help jump-start her career. The area's abundance of video game developers has pushed local high schools and colleges to tailor their multimedia programs. They've created specialized courses, degree programs and internships to help students sharpen their video game skills. The goal is to teach students that the games business is about more than entertainment, as software continues to have applications in medicine, defense and corporate training.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 9, 2005
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has signed a bill that makes it illegal to sell or rent violent video games to minors in California. The signing of the bill Friday, authored by Assembly Speaker Pro Tem Leland Yee, shows how far the video game industry has fallen out of political favor in a few months. California joins Illinois and Michigan in passing an anti-violent video game bill in the past year, and similar bills have been proposed in just about every state, though the courts have found prior prohibitions unconstitutional.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Monty Phan and Monty Phan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 2002
The top-selling video game of the past year was rated "Mature." You could say that about the entire video-game industry, too. It's an industry whose life span has reached young adulthood. The average gamer is a twentysomething male. And, not coincidentally, more games these days have adult themes - from the over-the-top violence that has become almost commonplace to a new game from Acclaim Entertainment that will have actual video of topless dancers. Revenues from video games rival those of Hollywood box-office receipts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2002
LOS ANGELES--Only six months after the video game war began, console makers are launching another battle for the hearts, minds and trigger fingers of their players this time in cyberspace. Sony, Microsoft and Nintendo detailed their Internet war plans to gamers, reporters and analysts this week at the annual Electronic Entertainment Expo, where hardware and software companies roll out the technology they plan to have ready by the winter holiday season. All the new services will give console gamers what PC owners have had for years the ability to play opponents across town, across the country and even around the world.
NEWS
By Steven Bodzin and Alex Pham and Steven Bodzin and Alex Pham,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 15, 2005
WASHINGTON - Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, a New York Democrat, called yesterday for a federal investigation into a downloadable modification that turns the best-selling computer game Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas into an interactive pornographic movie. Clinton's comments are part of the latest skirmish in the continuing battle between the entertainment industry and those seeking to keep children away from programs with sexual and violent content. "We should all be deeply disturbed that a game which now permits the simulation of lewd sexual acts in an interactive format with highly realistic graphics has fallen into the hands of young people across the country," she said in a letter to the head of the Federal Trade Commission.
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