Advertisement
HomeCollectionsVideo Card
IN THE NEWS

Video Card

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | March 12, 2001
Microprose's Starship Troopers is mildly entertaining - but really won't appeal to you unless you have lots of time and patience. This is a squad-based roleplaying strategy game in which you complete missions as a lieutenant in charge of a group of soldiers. The game is based on the interstellar space odyssey directed by Paul Verhoeven and released by TriStar Pictures back in 1997 with some references to the original 1950s sci-fi novel by Robert A. Heinlein. The story is pretty simple.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2010
A Laurel city police corporal was indicted in Howard County this week on charges that he secretly took video of his girlfriend's teenage daughter using a camera he had hidden in her bedroom closet. Edward Charles Schmitt, 37, of North Laurel, Howard County, is charged with one count of sexual abuse of a minor, two counts of visual surveillance and one count of camera surveillance. According to charging documents, he had hidden a video camera and photographed himself performing a lewd act, and also captured images of the girl from August 2009 until Feb. 28. He was prohibited from making any contact with the victim in the case.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2010
A Laurel city police corporal was indicted in Howard County this week on charges that he secretly took video of his girlfriend's teenage daughter using a camera he had hidden in her bedroom closet. Edward Charles Schmitt, 37, of North Laurel, Howard County, is charged with one count of sexual abuse of a minor, two counts of visual surveillance and one count of camera surveillance. According to charging documents, he had hidden a video camera and photographed himself performing a lewd act, and also captured images of the girl from August 2009 until Feb. 28. He was prohibited from making any contact with the victim in the case.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victor Godinez and Victor Godinez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 2, 2004
How good is Doom 3? After an intense, if not quite comprehensive, shootout on my PC, I must say that id Software has made the scariest game ever - but it's not a revolution in game play. The game starts off much like Half-Life as you arrive at a Mars research lab and make your way to a command post to get an assignment. At this point, there's a clear sense of, well, impending doom. You soon receive your first mission: Retrieve a scientist who has wandered off. Armed at first with nothing but your fists, and later a flashlight and pistol, you make your way into the shadowy depths of the base.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | March 29, 1998
TEN YEARS AGO, when computers were simpler and people asked me for help, I could usually offer some informed advice. Today's PCs and operating systems are so complex that I can barely figure out what's going on with my own machine.But occasionally, serendipity strikes, as it did last week when I got e-mail from a reader who complained that graphics and photos disappeared when he scrolled through Web pages with Microsoft Internet Explorer.As it turned out, I'd experienced the same glitch with a new Dell computer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn | September 21, 1998
A better idea: Rex Pro holds lots of data in credit-card sizeWhen the REX PC-Card Organizer premiered last winter, everyone went gaga over its tiny credit card size and crisp LCD screen. Powered by two lithium watch batteries, weighing 1.4 ounces and measuring 3 inches by 2 inches by 1/4 inch, the REX could be plugged into a laptop PC card slot or into a desktop computer with a docking station. It was bundled with with a personal information management software (address book, task organizer, appointment calendar, etc.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victor Godinez and Victor Godinez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 2, 2004
How good is Doom 3? After an intense, if not quite comprehensive, shootout on my PC, I must say that id Software has made the scariest game ever - but it's not a revolution in game play. The game starts off much like Half-Life as you arrive at a Mars research lab and make your way to a command post to get an assignment. At this point, there's a clear sense of, well, impending doom. You soon receive your first mission: Retrieve a scientist who has wandered off. Armed at first with nothing but your fists, and later a flashlight and pistol, you make your way into the shadowy depths of the base.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn | June 28, 1999
Adjustable joystick offers versatility, comfort for gamersSaitek's futuristic-looking Cyborg Stick 2000 joystick ($29.99) is a pleasure to use. Designed with comfort and versatility in mind, the 2000 works well for either left-handed or right-handed gamers. It allows you to adjust for hand size, thumb angle, thumb length, and throttle placement (left or right side).The Cyborg Stick 2000 has four analog buttons (three fire buttons and a trigger), a throttle, and a four-way hat switch. The only drawback to the Stick is that you must rely on your software to assign functions to the buttons.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DWIGHT SILVERMAN and DWIGHT SILVERMAN,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | March 15, 1999
It seems whenever Intel Corp. begins shipping a new processor, it comes with an unwanted feature -- controversy.When Intel's low-cost entry, the Celeron, was introduced, critics complained about its lack of onboard memory, or cache. And remember the floating-point math bug in the original Pentium? The Pentium Pro and Pentium II chips had similar problems.Now we have the Pentium III, with its built-in serial number that privacy groups say amounts to "Big Brother Inside." And there's the fact that the Pentium III is actually a Pentium II, with 70 extra software commands to boost multimedia performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JAMES COATES and JAMES COATES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 15, 1999
I was looking at a friend's new computer with Windows 98 and noticed that the program list, the one that appears when you click Start/Programs, was not alphabetized. Try as I will, I could not get these to sort "correctly." Is this a bug or a feature of Win98?The reason that the Start menu doesn't list programs alphabetically is because one can put each entry wherever one wants it simply by dragging it to the desired spot, a feature not in Windows 95, where alphabetization was the norm. The plus side is that you can list programs that have similar functions together even if they have different names, for example, putting Adobe Acrobat with Xerox Text Bridge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Doug Bedell and Jim Rossman and Doug Bedell and Jim Rossman,Knight Ridder/ Tribune | July 15, 2004
Getting a balky computer to behave can be a Dr. Phil experience: You confess your problems to some know-it-all geek, and he insults your intelligence. Now that Internet access is available in multiple spots in our daily lives, such indignities can be more easily avoided. Here are the five glitches that most often interrupt computing life and some commonsense ways to restore sick machines to good health. 1. Can't send or receive e-mail Your e-mail has been working flawlessly, then boom M-y instead of receiving the daily dose of junk, you are faced with the error: M-tHost M-fmail.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2001
If you're a couch potato, get yourself a comfy office chair as well, because these days you can sit at your computer and participate in America's favorite pastime - watching television. With hardware such as ATI Technologies' Radeon All-In-Wonder video card, you'll also have more control over what you watch - and when you watch it - than with a regular television. As I write this, I'm flipping through dozens of cable channels with my PC mouse. The picture quality is good, and any time I want to, I can hit the "record" button on my screen to start "taping" the show on my hard disk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | March 12, 2001
Microprose's Starship Troopers is mildly entertaining - but really won't appeal to you unless you have lots of time and patience. This is a squad-based roleplaying strategy game in which you complete missions as a lieutenant in charge of a group of soldiers. The game is based on the interstellar space odyssey directed by Paul Verhoeven and released by TriStar Pictures back in 1997 with some references to the original 1950s sci-fi novel by Robert A. Heinlein. The story is pretty simple.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | November 15, 1999
Windows 98 offers a program called Microsoft Windows TV. I installed it and have the little TV screen icon on my task bar. When I log on, I get fancy diagrams but nothing moves when I try to use the mouse to turn on the television.Using that old cliche, when all else fails, read the instructions, I did and see where I missed the last instruction that said "install antenna." There is no port on the back of my PC that says "antenna." Can you help me?Count yourself among the hordes of Microsoft customers who have had their hopes built up about getting television programs on their PCs by misleading directions built into Windows 98.As your experience underscores, the Windows setup screens falsely indicate that any PC running Windows 98 can receive broadcast video in the WinTV module of Windows.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn | June 28, 1999
Adjustable joystick offers versatility, comfort for gamersSaitek's futuristic-looking Cyborg Stick 2000 joystick ($29.99) is a pleasure to use. Designed with comfort and versatility in mind, the 2000 works well for either left-handed or right-handed gamers. It allows you to adjust for hand size, thumb angle, thumb length, and throttle placement (left or right side).The Cyborg Stick 2000 has four analog buttons (three fire buttons and a trigger), a throttle, and a four-way hat switch. The only drawback to the Stick is that you must rely on your software to assign functions to the buttons.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | March 29, 1999
Nothing will drive you crazy faster than a PC that works just fine one moment and goes haywire the next. It happened to a friend the other day. He had just finished installing an updated version of Internet Explorer (not the one released this month, but Version 4.0), and suddenly, everything in his browser window looked like a Mondrian painting. This is great if you're browsing an online museum, but not if you're trying to check out your soccer league's Web page.My friend tried everything he could think of -- he checked his monitor connection, rebooted his computer and reinstalled the browser.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | March 29, 1999
Nothing will drive you crazy faster than a PC that works just fine one moment and goes haywire the next. It happened to a friend the other day. He had just finished installing an updated version of Internet Explorer (not the one released this month, but Version 4.0), and suddenly, everything in his browser window looked like a Mondrian painting. This is great if you're browsing an online museum, but not if you're trying to check out your soccer league's Web page.My friend tried everything he could think of -- he checked his monitor connection, rebooted his computer and reinstalled the browser.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Doug Bedell and Jim Rossman and Doug Bedell and Jim Rossman,Knight Ridder/ Tribune | July 15, 2004
Getting a balky computer to behave can be a Dr. Phil experience: You confess your problems to some know-it-all geek, and he insults your intelligence. Now that Internet access is available in multiple spots in our daily lives, such indignities can be more easily avoided. Here are the five glitches that most often interrupt computing life and some commonsense ways to restore sick machines to good health. 1. Can't send or receive e-mail Your e-mail has been working flawlessly, then boom M-y instead of receiving the daily dose of junk, you are faced with the error: M-tHost M-fmail.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DWIGHT SILVERMAN and DWIGHT SILVERMAN,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | March 15, 1999
It seems whenever Intel Corp. begins shipping a new processor, it comes with an unwanted feature -- controversy.When Intel's low-cost entry, the Celeron, was introduced, critics complained about its lack of onboard memory, or cache. And remember the floating-point math bug in the original Pentium? The Pentium Pro and Pentium II chips had similar problems.Now we have the Pentium III, with its built-in serial number that privacy groups say amounts to "Big Brother Inside." And there's the fact that the Pentium III is actually a Pentium II, with 70 extra software commands to boost multimedia performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JAMES COATES and JAMES COATES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 15, 1999
I was looking at a friend's new computer with Windows 98 and noticed that the program list, the one that appears when you click Start/Programs, was not alphabetized. Try as I will, I could not get these to sort "correctly." Is this a bug or a feature of Win98?The reason that the Start menu doesn't list programs alphabetically is because one can put each entry wherever one wants it simply by dragging it to the desired spot, a feature not in Windows 95, where alphabetization was the norm. The plus side is that you can list programs that have similar functions together even if they have different names, for example, putting Adobe Acrobat with Xerox Text Bridge.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.