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By DAN RODRICKS | August 26, 2004
BEING AMONG the swarthy, I have been careful to shave when traveling, especially since September 2001. When you have dark hair and your father was from an island and, most summers, you brown up like a Jimmy Dean sausage - when you are about as far as humanly possible from looking like an Australian butterfly champion - you are self-conscious of security agents in public places. It doesn't fill my every waking hour. But it's there. I would never describe myself as being of "Middle Eastern descent," but I've been told I could play the part.
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NEWS
August 15, 2014
Seeing news reports about the recent shooting and its aftermath in Ferguson, Mo., makes me wonder whether all police officers should be armed with new weapon, the uniform-mounted video camera ( "'Another senseless death,'" Aug. 13). Arming officers with cameras and recording devices would document exactly what takes place in any police situation and action. Officers would be required to activate the device before each action, even in minor situations such as issuing traffic citations.
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NEWS
By Dianne Bates and Dianne Bates,Contributing Writer | January 10, 1993
Havre de Grace police officer Neil Crouch has a new partner that weighs in at less than 10 pounds, hangs above the --board and captures evidence on film.The latest addition to the 23-member city police force -- a video camera -- goes everywhere Officer Crouch goes in his patrol car and will be used primarily in traffic cases, especially those involving suspected drunken driving.The department added the camera three weeks ago as part of an experiment, following other law enforcement agencies in Maryland and elsewhere.
NEWS
September 16, 2013
Over the years there have any number of citizen complaints about police use of excessive force and other misconduct, including some high-profile cases where suspects died while in custody. But too often investigations into such complaints end in a situation where it's the witnesses' word against the officers', leaving neither side feeling that justice has been done. That's why we were intrigued by Baltimore City Del. Frank Conaway Jr.'s proposal last week to require police in Maryland to wear tiny cameras that record all their interactions with the public.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 23, 1999
PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- Nearly five dozen police officers -- 90 percent of the first two patrol shifts -- called in sick yesterday to register their disgust with the department for secretly operating a hidden video camera in a substation. Police administrators scurried to find replacements to patrol the city, asking officers from previous shifts to work overtime and assigning other officers who don't work patrol to do so. It was the first time in the department's 135-year history that officers had called in sick en masse.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | September 12, 1996
HAVRE DE GRACE -- It is early May of this year, a spring day in Baltimore. Leonard Kerpelman, to whom controversy clings like lint to a cheap suit, has ventured onto the campus of Frederick Douglass High School with his video camera.His mission is an innocent one. His wife had graduated from Western High School, as Douglass was then known, in 1946. But more has changed in 50 years than the name of the school, and soon Mr. Kerpelman encounters some of the less-appealing sights and sounds of the new era in which we live.
NEWS
By Kimberly Marselas and Kimberly Marselas,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 9, 2000
After four rock attacks on their son's parked car and bullets fired into their house, a fed-up Arnold couple finally caught a suspect themselves -- on videotape. Their late-night camera surveillance resulted in the arrest last week of a 15-year-old Severna Park boy. Police said he was caught on tape in a drive-by act of vandalism, tossing a rock from a moving pickup truck at the car of 18-year-old Josh Weiszhaar, parked outside his family's home on Long Meadow Way. "We didn't have any other way to catch him," said David Weiszhaar, Josh's father, explaining why the video camera was rolling nightly, aimed from an upstairs bedroom window.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy Tribune | September 10, 2009
SAN JOSE, Calif. - -Steve Jobs' appearance marked the only real surprise at Apple's press event Wednesday in San Francisco, an otherwise low-key affair in which the company announced some modest updates to its music products. Preshow rumors to the contrary, Apple didn't unveil its long-expected tablet computer, didn't introduce a new streaming video service and didn't kill the venerable iPod classic. Oh, and the Beatles still aren't available in the iTunes music store. Instead, the company added a video camera to its midrange iPod nano line, cut the prices on some other models and rolled out an update to its iTunes software and store that, among other things, adds digital liner notes to certain music albums.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2004
In the back yard of his Walkersville home, Ray Matlock sits in a gazebo as two Siamese cats spar. They'll be all right, he says. They make him smile, even today. The midday is perfectly weathered: a sneak of full fall in the air, football weather. Matlock wears a Ravens visor and talks so softly you wonder if he is always this soft-spoken, or whether the death of his boy has knocked the words out of him. A 1968 Oldsmobile is in the garage; his son had restored the classic. The car is a surviving point of pride.
NEWS
June 11, 1996
Police logScaggsville: 9300 block of Gorman Road: A burglar entered a home through an unlocked side window Saturday and took a shotgun and a video camera.North Laurel: 9100 block of Bourbon St.: A 1979 Buick LeSabre with Maryland tags CXB-516 was stolen Saturday or Sunday.Pub Date: 6/11/96
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
Howard County police are searching for a man who installed a video camera in the bedrooms and bathroom of an Ellicott City condominium where two young women live, unbeknownst to the women. Police released footage of the suspect that was found on the camera after its discovery last month, and are asking for the public's help identifying him following an unsuccessful investigation to date. The man allegedly entered the condo of the women, both in their 20s, multiple times over a period of four months to change the location of the hidden camera, police said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
An Edgewood man was sentenced to 40 years in prison Thursday after he pleaded guilty to three counts of sexual assault of a 4-year-old Harford County girl who lived in a house where he was temporarily residing. Jhugh Joshua Metcalf, 28, was charged in November 2009. The assaults took place in the girl's bedroom from October to November of 2009, according to court papers. Harford County Circuit Judge William O. Carr sentenced Metcalf to a total of 60 years, with 20 years suspended.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2010
The video surveillance camera captured security guards ejecting two groups of men who had gotten into a fight inside the Velvet Rope, a nightclub on Redwood Street near Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Cameras recorded two of the men as they walked to South and Water streets, where they met with a man standing near a white Chevrolet van at the curb, according to law enforcement authorities. Police said they watched on video as the driver directed the men to a "specific part of the front engine compartment" and removed an object.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2010
The way Omar Broadway sees it, Maryland prisons are overrun with gangs, disciplinary rules are ignored and inmates pass the time playing video games and making wine in their cells. You don't have to take his word for it: He says he's getting it on film. Broadway, a New Jersey native serving a 12-year sentence for carjacking, has gained notoriety as an amateur documentarian of life behind bars. The choppy footage he captured in a Newark prison was turned into a full-length feature ("An Omar Broadway Film")
NEWS
August 11, 2010
Cameras don't eliminate crime. They don't patrol neighborhoods. They can't interview suspects. They don't make arrests. But as the evidence of recent years suggests, they can be a helpful tool in both deterring and solving certain kinds of crime. Five years ago, a science teacher was murdered in a parking garage at Towson Town Center, and public outrage over the event gave rise to a Baltimore County law requiring shopping centers with big-box stores or 15 or more retail businesses to install enough security cameras to monitor at least 75 percent of parking spaces.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy Tribune | September 10, 2009
SAN JOSE, Calif. - -Steve Jobs' appearance marked the only real surprise at Apple's press event Wednesday in San Francisco, an otherwise low-key affair in which the company announced some modest updates to its music products. Preshow rumors to the contrary, Apple didn't unveil its long-expected tablet computer, didn't introduce a new streaming video service and didn't kill the venerable iPod classic. Oh, and the Beatles still aren't available in the iTunes music store. Instead, the company added a video camera to its midrange iPod nano line, cut the prices on some other models and rolled out an update to its iTunes software and store that, among other things, adds digital liner notes to certain music albums.
NEWS
March 2, 1993
POLICE LOG* Town Center: 10500 block of Little Patuxent Parkway: Someone broke the passenger window on a 1987 Nissan 300ZX between 8:45 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. Thursday, and stole several items including a $25 purple gym bag, an $80 pair of purple Nike shoes and two T-shirts valued at $10 each.* Hickory Ridge: 6500 block of Freetown Road: Someone stole $235 in cash, an $800 video camera and a $780 video camera from the coaches' locker room at Atholton High School between Feb. 18 and 4 p.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
An Edgewood man was sentenced to 40 years in prison Thursday after he pleaded guilty to three counts of sexual assault of a 4-year-old Harford County girl who lived in a house where he was temporarily residing. Jhugh Joshua Metcalf, 28, was charged in November 2009. The assaults took place in the girl's bedroom from October to November of 2009, according to court papers. Harford County Circuit Judge William O. Carr sentenced Metcalf to a total of 60 years, with 20 years suspended.
NEWS
May 27, 2009
There's no question that Baltimore County has experienced an increase in vandalism in its parks in recent years. Some of it - setting fire to playgrounds or bathrooms, for instance - is alarming, but most of it falls into a less dire category of graffiti and petty crime, an all-too-familiar problem not only in urban areas and national parks but in small-town America as well. That doesn't make it acceptable behavior, of course, but does it justify spending $600,000 on "smart" cameras to keep five of the county's regional parks under constant video surveillance?
NEWS
May 21, 2008
Big Brother hasn't yet arrived in Baltimore, but he's knocking on the door. There are more than 450 surveillance cameras perched around the city - high on street corner poles, spotting cars crossing the Key Bridge from an Inner Harbor rooftop, recording comings and goings in subway and light rail stations, monitoring every movement in dozens of other locations, both discreet and highly visible. While the cameras collect a dizzying montage of the city in motion, they have been of limited use in solving crimes and have been only moderately helpful in deterring illegal conduct, security experts agree.
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