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By Peter D. Franklin and Peter D. Franklin,Universal Press Syndicate | March 9, 1994
Probably the last place anyone would think to look for fish is in the garden -- until now."The Victory Garden Fish and Vegetable Cookbook," by Marian Morash (Knopf, $35), is a real find among the cabbage, carrots, tomatoes and zucchini.Ms. Morash is no stranger to those who have watched the "Victory Garden" series on public television; she has been cooking on the show since 1977. She also is the author of "The Victory Garden Cookbook" (Knopf, 1982) A few basic recipes from that widely acclaimed book are included in the fish book "because they go so well with fish," she says.
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NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | June 15, 2003
Picture yourself on an exotic tropical island. Living in paradise in your own little world. Relaxing, savoring the sun, sipping something tasty. You could have the life -- well, almost -- in your own backyard. Yes, your own lovely backyard. Home designer John Hardy, who has lived in Bali for the past 27 years, has created a backyard paradise for average folks. OK, not exactly average folks. But for homeowners who can afford to toss around $15,000. Hardy's creation is a Bale, an open-sided bamboo pavilion with grass-thatched roof, like ancient Hindu living quarters.
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NEWS
February 20, 1998
Marie-Louise von Franz,83, who worked with Swiss psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung and wrote books based on his theories, died Tuesday in Zurich, Switzerland.Arthur Cohn,87, a versatile composer, conductor and author specializing in classical music, died Sunday in New York.Kenneth Cowan,35, an associate producer of the public television series "This Old House" and "The Victory Garden," was among the 203 people who died in Monday's crash of a China Airlines jet. He was returning from a location scouting trip in Bali, Indonesia, for the new season of "The Victory Garden."
NEWS
February 20, 1998
Marie-Louise von Franz,83, who worked with Swiss psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung and wrote books based on his theories, died Tuesday in Zurich, Switzerland.Arthur Cohn,87, a versatile composer, conductor and author specializing in classical music, died Sunday in New York.Kenneth Cowan,35, an associate producer of the public television series "This Old House" and "The Victory Garden," was among the 203 people who died in Monday's crash of a China Airlines jet. He was returning from a location scouting trip in Bali, Indonesia, for the new season of "The Victory Garden."
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | June 15, 2003
Picture yourself on an exotic tropical island. Living in paradise in your own little world. Relaxing, savoring the sun, sipping something tasty. You could have the life -- well, almost -- in your own backyard. Yes, your own lovely backyard. Home designer John Hardy, who has lived in Bali for the past 27 years, has created a backyard paradise for average folks. OK, not exactly average folks. But for homeowners who can afford to toss around $15,000. Hardy's creation is a Bale, an open-sided bamboo pavilion with grass-thatched roof, like ancient Hindu living quarters.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau | May 3, 1992
SALISBURY -- It may be a reversal of the movie cliche, but university officials here have discovered that even if they don't build a ball field, people will come.Faced with budget cuts that prevented them from turning 9 acres of land into new athletic fields, Salisbury State University administrators decided to let campus employees and students use some of the property to grow vegetables and flowers.The idea quickly took root. So far, 26 plots have been set aside for faculty members, university staff and students who are testing their green thumbs by planting tomatoes, corn, peppers, watermelon and other vegetables and flowers that traditionally flourish in the rich Lower Eastern Shore soil.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | November 16, 1995
According to a survey in the November issue of the trade magazine Food Arts, Americans may be more health conscious than ever; but when it comes to eating out, they want their beef.My survey was slightly less scientific. I went to McCafferty's on a rainy weeknight and saw that the place was packed -- when other restaurants would be languishing on the vine. Everybody, young and old, was eating great slabs of beef, rosy and juicy, with mounds of mashed potatoes.I like to think of McCafferty's as the Prime Rib of the '90s.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
Getting kids interested in gardening doesn't require a lot of plotting and planning. They are drawn to dirt, and they're ready to become budding horticulturists as soon as they're old enough to grasp one crucial concept: They're supposed to put seeds and plants in the ground, not take them out.Of course, if your vegetable beds become as weed-choked as many did during last summer's dry spells, a youngster given to yanking might come in handy. Just don't expect anyone under age 3 to discriminate between crab grass and corn seedlings.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro | April 20, 1991
In the truest sense of the word, Gloria Luster has built a victory garden. When she adopted her cluttered Pimlico lot from Baltimore City a decade ago, she could not get a pick ax into the hard pan that had replaced a razed house.To "help the soil become alive," Mrs. Luster fed her lot with organic matter; grass clippings and leaf compost, mostly. She fought what few pests plagued the garden with "beneficial" insects, such as praying mantises, and if absolutely necessary, made judicial use of Rotenone and Pyrethrum, powerful organic insecticides.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Staff Writer | February 16, 1992
The dream of spring can become a reality for those who attend the 1992 Maymont Flower and Garden Show next weekend at the Richmond Convention Centre."A Midwinter's Dream" is the theme of this year's show, which fills the 62,000-square-foot convention center with 18 large landscape exhibits, numerous floral displays and 103 flower- and garden-related booths. One of the landscape exhibits depicts a tropical rain forest; another features a pastoral setting and a water garden.Nationally known garden experts will speak on a variety of topics, including orchids, bonsai, flower arrangements, house plants and natural pest control.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | November 16, 1995
According to a survey in the November issue of the trade magazine Food Arts, Americans may be more health conscious than ever; but when it comes to eating out, they want their beef.My survey was slightly less scientific. I went to McCafferty's on a rainy weeknight and saw that the place was packed -- when other restaurants would be languishing on the vine. Everybody, young and old, was eating great slabs of beef, rosy and juicy, with mounds of mashed potatoes.I like to think of McCafferty's as the Prime Rib of the '90s.
FEATURES
By Peter D. Franklin and Peter D. Franklin,Universal Press Syndicate | March 9, 1994
Probably the last place anyone would think to look for fish is in the garden -- until now."The Victory Garden Fish and Vegetable Cookbook," by Marian Morash (Knopf, $35), is a real find among the cabbage, carrots, tomatoes and zucchini.Ms. Morash is no stranger to those who have watched the "Victory Garden" series on public television; she has been cooking on the show since 1977. She also is the author of "The Victory Garden Cookbook" (Knopf, 1982) A few basic recipes from that widely acclaimed book are included in the fish book "because they go so well with fish," she says.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
Getting kids interested in gardening doesn't require a lot of plotting and planning. They are drawn to dirt, and they're ready to become budding horticulturists as soon as they're old enough to grasp one crucial concept: They're supposed to put seeds and plants in the ground, not take them out.Of course, if your vegetable beds become as weed-choked as many did during last summer's dry spells, a youngster given to yanking might come in handy. Just don't expect anyone under age 3 to discriminate between crab grass and corn seedlings.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau | May 3, 1992
SALISBURY -- It may be a reversal of the movie cliche, but university officials here have discovered that even if they don't build a ball field, people will come.Faced with budget cuts that prevented them from turning 9 acres of land into new athletic fields, Salisbury State University administrators decided to let campus employees and students use some of the property to grow vegetables and flowers.The idea quickly took root. So far, 26 plots have been set aside for faculty members, university staff and students who are testing their green thumbs by planting tomatoes, corn, peppers, watermelon and other vegetables and flowers that traditionally flourish in the rich Lower Eastern Shore soil.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Staff Writer | February 16, 1992
The dream of spring can become a reality for those who attend the 1992 Maymont Flower and Garden Show next weekend at the Richmond Convention Centre."A Midwinter's Dream" is the theme of this year's show, which fills the 62,000-square-foot convention center with 18 large landscape exhibits, numerous floral displays and 103 flower- and garden-related booths. One of the landscape exhibits depicts a tropical rain forest; another features a pastoral setting and a water garden.Nationally known garden experts will speak on a variety of topics, including orchids, bonsai, flower arrangements, house plants and natural pest control.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro | April 20, 1991
In the truest sense of the word, Gloria Luster has built a victory garden. When she adopted her cluttered Pimlico lot from Baltimore City a decade ago, she could not get a pick ax into the hard pan that had replaced a razed house.To "help the soil become alive," Mrs. Luster fed her lot with organic matter; grass clippings and leaf compost, mostly. She fought what few pests plagued the garden with "beneficial" insects, such as praying mantises, and if absolutely necessary, made judicial use of Rotenone and Pyrethrum, powerful organic insecticides.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1998
A Parsnip-Pecan Bread recipe was the request of Dolores Greenberg of Kelso, Wash. The recipe, she wrote, "was given out on the 'Victory Garden,' PBS Channel 10, but I couldn't get it. It sounds something like zucchini bread, but I think it had less sugar because parsnips are sweeter."Similar responses - some identifying the recipe as bread, others as cake - arrived from Debbie Holter of Fallston, Bettie Nyquist of Sioux Falls, S.D., Rose J. Katen of Falls Church, Va., Elizabeth Sykes of Towson and Anne Tallarico of Laurel.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 5, 1996
Favored Cashell Lassie scored a half-length victory over Garden Street yesterday at Pimlico in the $53,025 Toddler Breeder's Cup.Cashell Lassie, Maryland-bred and owned by Dumberton Farm, defeated five other 2-year-old fillies to remain unbeaten after two races.Cashel Lassie paid $5.80, $3 and $2.10. Garden Street paid $3.40 and $2.10. Fancy Fred paid $2.10 to show.The morning-line favorite Clandestine Caller was scratched early yesterday.Pub Date: 8/05/96
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