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Victory Day

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NEWS
By Adam Lisberg and Adam Lisberg,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 9, 2002
BERGEN COUNTY, N.J. - They fought for a nation that no longer exists, a nation that turned its back on their sacrifices. As young men, they paid a horrible price to save their country and their people; as old men, they fled that country carrying suitcases and memories. Had they stayed in Russia they would at least have Victory Day - May 9, the day the Russians celebrate to mark the end of World War II in Europe - when old men parade through the streets in their uniforms, chests puffed with pride and festooned with medals.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | April 27, 2009
It was a late-April game in a long season for a club that has already lost more than it has won, but Sunday afternoon's 8-5 victory over the Texas Rangers apparently meant something to the Orioles. Something more than just an elusive Sunday win. "I think there was a little bit of an urgency there," said second baseman Brian Roberts, who had four of the Orioles' 14 hits. "It wasn't going to be the end of the world [if Texas won], but we need to get something positive going, for sure." After starting the season 6-2, the Orioles (9-10)
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 30, 2000
MOSCOW -- Suddenly, spring has broken out here, as it does only in Russia, with weeks and weeks of pent-up expectation finally giving way in all places at once, with flowers and verdant grasses and green growth erupting everywhere, with darkness in full retreat before ever-lengthening hours of daylight, with sunbathers and lovers on every bench. Just in time, Russians have before them the chance to celebrate not one, not two -- but six holidays between now and May 9. Head to the dacha, head to the lake, head to the park; turn the soil, plant potatoes, fix the car. Forget about work -- just forget about it. But one thing, please: no more ideology.
NEWS
By Adam Lisberg and Adam Lisberg,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 9, 2002
BERGEN COUNTY, N.J. - They fought for a nation that no longer exists, a nation that turned its back on their sacrifices. As young men, they paid a horrible price to save their country and their people; as old men, they fled that country carrying suitcases and memories. Had they stayed in Russia they would at least have Victory Day - May 9, the day the Russians celebrate to mark the end of World War II in Europe - when old men parade through the streets in their uniforms, chests puffed with pride and festooned with medals.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | April 27, 2009
It was a late-April game in a long season for a club that has already lost more than it has won, but Sunday afternoon's 8-5 victory over the Texas Rangers apparently meant something to the Orioles. Something more than just an elusive Sunday win. "I think there was a little bit of an urgency there," said second baseman Brian Roberts, who had four of the Orioles' 14 hits. "It wasn't going to be the end of the world [if Texas won], but we need to get something positive going, for sure." After starting the season 6-2, the Orioles (9-10)
NEWS
By John W. Frece and Doug Birch and John W. Frece and Doug Birch,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writers Thomas W. Waldron, Robert Erlandson and Michael James contributed to this article | November 15, 1994
Democrat Parris N. Glendening apparently clinched the Maryland governor's race yesterday, though his razor-thin lead may have to withstand a legal challenge from his Republican opponent, Ellen R. Sauerbrey.After six days of absentee ballot counting across the state and some review of the votes cast last Tuesday, Mr. Glendening led Mrs. Sauerbrey by 5,366 votes out of more than 1.4 million cast.Even if Mrs. Sauerbrey were to take all of the still uncounted absentee ballots -- about 2,500 statewide, including nearly 1,300 in Baltimore County -- she could not overtake Mr. Glendening unless she were successful in getting thousands of votes thrown out.The margin was big enough for Mr. Glendening to declare victory yesterday, and to say he intends to announce his transition plans later this week.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 9, 2000
MOSCOW -- Sometimes an offhand remark can sum up, unexpectedly, a whole different way of looking at the world. Andrei Klimov, 17, is a student at Moscow's prestigious diplomatic academy. Recently he was asked what he remembered about the Victory Day celebrations in the small town in Russia's northwest where he grew up. "I was proud," he said. "It was the West that sent this fascism, and it was the Soviet Union that stopped it." There it was. World War II in a nutshell: West vs. Soviets, and the Soviets won. In his schooldays in Karelia, Klimov was taught that the Americans and the British were mixed up in the fight against the Nazis, but the essence of it was that the attack on Russia came out of the West, as it always does, and the Russians, as they always do, managed to repel it with staggering losses.
SPORTS
June 27, 2004
Who's hot Garret Anderson of the Angels is hitting .349 (22-for-63) in 16 games since missing 42 games with back problems. Who's not Alex Rodriguez of the Yankees stranded seven runners, including five in scoring position. Line of the day Hank Blalock, Rangers 3B AB R H RBI HR 5 3 4 2 1 He said it "It was kind of weird to come up to Boston and hear so many of your fans chanting like that. I turned around and smiled." Jimmy Rollins, Phillies second baseman On deck Curt Schilling of the Red Sox goes for his 10th victory to day, facing the Phillies.
NEWS
May 6, 2005
As Victory Day brought World War II in Europe to a joyous close across America 60 years ago, there was one confined group in Maryland that shed tears of sympathy for Germany - the 2,500 German prisoners of war being held at Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County. Many of the prisoners wept when told of Germany's surrender to the Allies, The Sunreported. Many of the prisoners had fought with German Gen. Erwin Rommel in Africa. Living conditions for the POWs at Fort Meade were simple at best.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 9, 2000
MOSCOW -- Sometimes an offhand remark can sum up, unexpectedly, a whole different way of looking at the world. Andrei Klimov, 17, is a student at Moscow's prestigious diplomatic academy. Recently he was asked what he remembered about the Victory Day celebrations in the small town in Russia's northwest where he grew up. "I was proud," he said. "It was the West that sent this fascism, and it was the Soviet Union that stopped it." There it was. World War II in a nutshell: West vs. Soviets, and the Soviets won. In his schooldays in Karelia, Klimov was taught that the Americans and the British were mixed up in the fight against the Nazis, but the essence of it was that the attack on Russia came out of the West, as it always does, and the Russians, as they always do, managed to repel it with staggering losses.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 30, 2000
MOSCOW -- Suddenly, spring has broken out here, as it does only in Russia, with weeks and weeks of pent-up expectation finally giving way in all places at once, with flowers and verdant grasses and green growth erupting everywhere, with darkness in full retreat before ever-lengthening hours of daylight, with sunbathers and lovers on every bench. Just in time, Russians have before them the chance to celebrate not one, not two -- but six holidays between now and May 9. Head to the dacha, head to the lake, head to the park; turn the soil, plant potatoes, fix the car. Forget about work -- just forget about it. But one thing, please: no more ideology.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and Doug Birch and John W. Frece and Doug Birch,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writers Thomas W. Waldron, Robert Erlandson and Michael James contributed to this article | November 15, 1994
Democrat Parris N. Glendening apparently clinched the Maryland governor's race yesterday, though his razor-thin lead may have to withstand a legal challenge from his Republican opponent, Ellen R. Sauerbrey.After six days of absentee ballot counting across the state and some review of the votes cast last Tuesday, Mr. Glendening led Mrs. Sauerbrey by 5,366 votes out of more than 1.4 million cast.Even if Mrs. Sauerbrey were to take all of the still uncounted absentee ballots -- about 2,500 statewide, including nearly 1,300 in Baltimore County -- she could not overtake Mr. Glendening unless she were successful in getting thousands of votes thrown out.The margin was big enough for Mr. Glendening to declare victory yesterday, and to say he intends to announce his transition plans later this week.
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