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NEWS
By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 23, 1999
AS CHRISTMAS DRAWS near, it's easy to be caught up in the shopping, last-minute cooking and general frenzy that the holiday season can bring. It might be difficult to remember the magic of Christmases gone by, when, as a child, your only worry was deciding which present to open first on Christmas morning. But one Carroll County resident needs only to look around his home during the holiday season to be reminded of a calmer, more relaxed time when holiday decorating and celebrations were revered and treated as sacred family traditions.
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NEWS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2009
Bob and Susan Lathroum had always dreamed of owning and operating a bed-and-breakfast. So 11 years ago, when Bob lost his third management job in 15 years, the couple decided the time was right to pursue that dream. The quest led them from Linthicum to Chestertown on the Eastern Shore. "The second time I crossed the bridge over the Chester River, I said, 'This is home,' " Susan Lathroum recalled of the historic little town. The Lathroums purchased the Widow's Walk Inn in 1997. Covered in yellow clapboard siding and trimmed with deep red shutters, the stately Victorian was built in 1877 and is listed in Chestertown's historic registry.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff writer | May 13, 1991
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.It was a time of sun-bathed croquet lawns and gentle breezes that carried the music of a glass harp. It was a time for Queen Victoria to sit under a white garden trellis and accept the curtsies of girls in long dresses.But, alas, it was not Kensington Gardens but Quiet Waters Park inAnnapolis. And assembled there were children of the '90s -- the 1990s. The students of Arundel Junior High School in Odenton strained against the steamy restrictions of their formal clothing and balked at the waltz.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to the Sun | July 18, 2008
Holly Greve has proven that it's never too late to start over. In her case, it was acquiring the right setting for a precious collection of furnishings from another place in time. "I found my dream house at the age of 58," said Greve, director of social catering for Loews Annapolis Hotel. "My son said to me, 'Mom, everyone goes forward, but you want to go backward,' and he's right!" In March 2007, Greve sold her condo in Columbia and purchased a two-story, vinyl-sided four-square in the Southwest Baltimore neighborhood of Westgate.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to the Sun | July 18, 2008
Holly Greve has proven that it's never too late to start over. In her case, it was acquiring the right setting for a precious collection of furnishings from another place in time. "I found my dream house at the age of 58," said Greve, director of social catering for Loews Annapolis Hotel. "My son said to me, 'Mom, everyone goes forward, but you want to go backward,' and he's right!" In March 2007, Greve sold her condo in Columbia and purchased a two-story, vinyl-sided four-square in the Southwest Baltimore neighborhood of Westgate.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | September 5, 1993
With Labor Day's arrival, folks are returning home from vacation, schools and offices are moving back into high gear, and thoughts are turning from sunburns to burning the midnight oil. Those not content with ordinary lighting increasingly are looking for lamps with age and character: lamps that can light up a room in more ways than one.People are searching attics, flea markets and dealers' shops for vintage lighting devices, and discovering that there were...
TRAVEL
By [LORI SEARS] | October 8, 2006
Victorian Week in Cape May Step into the Victorian era in Cape May, N.J., today through Oct. 15 at the town's annual Victorian Week. Sponsored by the Mid-Atlantic Center for the Arts, the weeklong event features historic home tours, Victorian music, a tea dance, architectural Cape Island boat tours, craft-beer tastings, winery tours, living history reenactments (including John Philip Sousa), a murder-mystery dinner, glassblowing demonstrations, antiques appraisals, craft shows and more.
NEWS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2009
Bob and Susan Lathroum had always dreamed of owning and operating a bed-and-breakfast. So 11 years ago, when Bob lost his third management job in 15 years, the couple decided the time was right to pursue that dream. The quest led them from Linthicum to Chestertown on the Eastern Shore. "The second time I crossed the bridge over the Chester River, I said, 'This is home,' " Susan Lathroum recalled of the historic little town. The Lathroums purchased the Widow's Walk Inn in 1997. Covered in yellow clapboard siding and trimmed with deep red shutters, the stately Victorian was built in 1877 and is listed in Chestertown's historic registry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | December 14, 2000
Holiday celebration, Victorian-style Samantha is a 9-year-old orphan being raised by her grandmother in the waning days of the Victorian era, the early 1900s. She couldn't be more excited about the Christmas holiday, and prepares by creating homemade gifts and readying the house for the guests who will soon arrive. Read more about adventures in "Samantha's Surprise: A Christmas Story," part of the American Girls book series. The Bel Air Branch Library takes cues from Samantha's story and celebrates Christmas Victorian-style Wednesday evening.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 6, 1994
Q: I recently inherited a Victorian-era oak bed that's so fabulous that I have to find a way to make it look at ease in our bedroom. The bed is truly gargantuan, however, and it really overwhelms the box-like room. Would it help to paint over the medium stain of the oak? Is there any other treatment that might make the bed seem more in keeping with its surroundings?A: I wouldn't tamper with the finish of such a wonderful piece. Instead, you should try to lighten up the room itself and give it a look that's at least vaguely Victorian.
FEATURES
By Anna Eisenberg and Anna Eisenberg,Sun reporter | July 5, 2007
A veteran of musical theater (think Hairspray, hon), Baltimore expands its range this month with a prominent role in a classic, equally well-coiffed comedy. The Young Victorian Theatre Company, devoted to the operatic works of William Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan, opens its 37th season this weekend with the duo's HMS Pinafore - but this time the audience favorite has a hometown twist. If you go HMS Pinafore runs through July 15 at Bryn Mawr School's Centennial Hall, 109 W. Melrose Ave. in Roland Park.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Jennifer Skalka and Andrew A. Green and Jennifer Skalka,SUN REPORTERS | March 20, 2007
One visit to the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup in February and new Corrections Secretary Gary D. Maynard knew it shouldn't remain a maximum-security prison. But when a correctional officer was stabbed on March 2, Maynard concluded that the facility built in 1878 needed to be shut down immediately - and Gov. Martin O'Malley quickly agreed. State prison officials have been complaining about the poor conditions, unsafe design and deteriorating structure of the House of Correction for at least 50 years.
TRAVEL
By [LORI SEARS] | October 8, 2006
Victorian Week in Cape May Step into the Victorian era in Cape May, N.J., today through Oct. 15 at the town's annual Victorian Week. Sponsored by the Mid-Atlantic Center for the Arts, the weeklong event features historic home tours, Victorian music, a tea dance, architectural Cape Island boat tours, craft-beer tastings, winery tours, living history reenactments (including John Philip Sousa), a murder-mystery dinner, glassblowing demonstrations, antiques appraisals, craft shows and more.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | December 18, 2005
Before she pours a spot of tea, Debbie Leister gets into character. The Carroll County Farm Museum volunteer pulls her auburn hair back into a dainty net, dons a gray Victorian gown, made fuller by several crinolines, and accessorizes the ensemble with black lace gloves, a fashion-must for ladies of the 19th century. Several times a year, the museum's Victorian parlor doubles as a tearoom with Leister presiding. The holiday teas, the most popular in the series, are the most festive and Leister's favorite.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2005
From the time he was a teenager, Dean Alexander, now 41, has had a love affair with old things. As a youth, his passion was restoring antique British cars. Now the professional photographer has a new obsession - a meticulously restored, 19th-century Victorian town home on Baltimore's east side. In 1988, not long after college, Dean Alexander purchased the three-story, end of group, brick house on East Pratt Street for $52,000. "The gasps at the price [need] to be taken in context," Alexander said.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 2002
SITTING ON the porch of their white-and-blue Victorian home in Woodbine, Robyn and Doug Abrams enjoy playing with their cats and listening to the sounds of the nearby river. The Abramses also share their home as a bed-and-breakfast with guests from around the country and even England. Inn the Hollow, in Carroll County -- just over the Howard County line -- was opened in 1999 after coaxing from family members. This is not an easy task because the Abramses work full-time jobs. Doug is manager of a software division in network services, and Robyn is a staff development coordinator in Howard County.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1996
Some of the prettiest trees in Christmas shops this season are labeled Victorian. Decorated with lacy, beribboned confections in pastel colors, they are lovely to look at and reminiscent of holidays past. But such ornaments would never have appeared on a Victorian Christmas tree."They have a feminine, boudoir look," says Carolyn Flaherty, editor of Victorian Homes magazine. "Very romantic. But the Victorians were dignified. They never would have had them in their parlors."It's easy enough, though, to duplicate how the Victorians actually decorated -- without spending a lot of money.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 30, 1995
In yesterday's LIVE section, a list of holiday open houses incorrectly reported the closing date for Victorian Holiday at Carroll County Farm Museum. The house is open through Sunday, Dec. 3, as the accompanying story reported.The Sun regrets the errors.House and garden tours are simply delightful, and fall festivals are great fun, too, but the sights and scents of a Christmas house tour make it the grandest tour of all. With fresh greens that help bring the outdoors inside, the scents of pine and spices, a cozy fire and the warm glow of candlelight, what could be more inviting?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | December 14, 2000
Holiday celebration, Victorian-style Samantha is a 9-year-old orphan being raised by her grandmother in the waning days of the Victorian era, the early 1900s. She couldn't be more excited about the Christmas holiday, and prepares by creating homemade gifts and readying the house for the guests who will soon arrive. Read more about adventures in "Samantha's Surprise: A Christmas Story," part of the American Girls book series. The Bel Air Branch Library takes cues from Samantha's story and celebrates Christmas Victorian-style Wednesday evening.
NEWS
By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 23, 1999
AS CHRISTMAS DRAWS near, it's easy to be caught up in the shopping, last-minute cooking and general frenzy that the holiday season can bring. It might be difficult to remember the magic of Christmases gone by, when, as a child, your only worry was deciding which present to open first on Christmas morning. But one Carroll County resident needs only to look around his home during the holiday season to be reminded of a calmer, more relaxed time when holiday decorating and celebrations were revered and treated as sacred family traditions.
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