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By John Guinn and John Guinn,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 2, 1994
Bras and Brahms. Panties and Prokofiev. Slips and Schubert.You might think those pairings are as incompatible as venison and vegetarians, but you'd be wrong. Women's intimate apparel and classical music have, uh, climbed into bed together with surprisingly successful results.The pairing of two such apparently disparate elements comes courtesy of Victoria's Secret, the firm that sells what were once considered "women's unmentionables" through catalog sales and retail outlets.It all started when the Victoria's Secret folks decided to use classical selections for the background music piped into their stores.
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NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | July 1, 2007
Victoria's Secret advertises seven "must-have" bras, which is already four more than I have. I own three bras. The beige one. The black one. And the one that is in the wash. For my 21-year-old daughter and her tribe, seven bras would only amount to a starter set. They have more bras in their dresser drawers -- or on their bedroom floors -- than they have dollars in their wallets. Among these young women, bras are the new shoes. Something different for every outfit. And you can't have too many.
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FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | April 22, 2004
IT WAS AFTER GETTING another alarming glimpse of Bob Dylan's frozen mug in that commercial for Victoria's Secret that I realized the whole concept behind celebrity product endorsements escapes me. Let's examine that Victoria's Secret commercial for a moment. OK, here's a company selling a product, namely sexy lingerie. It's a company that promotes a certain image of itself. An image of eternal youth. An image of playfulness. An image of sex appeal. In fact, the image of sex is promoted so relentlessly you get the feeling Victoria's Secret believes most of the world's ills - including war, poverty and environmental degradation - would largely disappear if only women would show more cleavage.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | June 3, 2007
As Susan Rohr approached her mid-30s, it dawned on her that her sexy Victoria's Secret lingerie was made more for her former self -- Susan in her 20s. Or maybe even her teens. "It wasn't fitting so well anymore," says Rohr, 42. "It wasn't quality." A move to the lingerie sections in more-expensive department stores didn't help much. "They do the job," says Rohr, of Patterson Park. "But they're not very pretty. They're not creative. Lots of beige, lots of white. Lots of black." And the ultra high-end lines, such as La Perla, a celebrity favorite, were well out of reach on her salary as a freelance nurse anesthetist.
NEWS
December 29, 1993
A FELLOW we know wondered why women don't have X-ray vision. If only they could see into the brains of the men they love, he suggested, they would discover their partner's fantasies -- and dress accordingly.This odd observation followed our friend's visit to a Victoria's Secret shop during the Christmas rush. Victoria's Secret peddles a line of women's apparel designed to, shall we say, enhance their attractiveness? Frilly stuff.Yet our friend ventured there somewhat shyly, half expecting the salesclerks to insinuate a)
NEWS
By David Boldt | September 21, 1999
FURTHER evidence that American taste may have deteriorated beyond repair comes from two recent articles in the Wall Street Journal on declining standards of dress in the workplace: "Tight T-shirts, stretch sweaters, bare legs," the Journal reported in a fashion article, "and that's the men."The larger problem, that story and another suggest, is women. They are now headed for work in clingy sweaters with plunging V-necks, tight shirts, micro-miniskirts and stiletto heels.The opening example was of a woman making a formal presentation in a tube top. All of which requires further contemplation of that most ponderable of questions facing modern man: What would they wear if they wanted to be regarded as sex objects?
NEWS
By Judith Green Grilling the neighbors | October 19, 1997
Close to the altogetherTHREE ELEGANTLY slim women modeling fancy underwear in Victoria's Secret at the Annapolis Mall one day last week were no ordinary lingerie buyers.They were dancers Sandra Prehoda, Anmarie Touloumis and Shari Vazquez of Ballet Theater of Annapolis, looking for costumes to wear in their roles as the naked brides of Dracula in BTA's production this weekend of the vampire thriller.Their attire had to be as close to the altogether as possible. Which is what brought them to Victoria's Secret.
NEWS
October 6, 1995
County police arrested a Bowie man and a 17-year-old Bowie girl Tuesday on theft charges after a stolen credit card was used to buy $747 worth of clothing from five stores at Marley Station.Police said a Macy's security guard called shortly after 4:30 p.m. when he saw two people picking up clothes without looking at size or price. He warned the sales clerk to ask for a second identification if one tried to use a credit card.When the girl attempted to pay with a card, the clerk asked for identification.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | April 10, 1993
It's probably safe to say that no other lingerie display has ever whipped up so much concern in Towson.The display in the window of the Love Ones Lingerie shop at 402 1/2 York Road features a female mannequin dressed in leather scanties. She is holding a bullwhip that is looped around the neck of a male mannequin, who is similarly attired in a leather jockstrap and a harness.The shop's arrival in early December startled many shoppers.It also offended York Road merchants' sense of the town's family image.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Phil Kloer and Phil Kloer,Cox News Service | April 4, 2004
How many bust lines can a bra push up / Before they see the sky? The answer, my friend, is in a new Victoria's Secret television commercial starring Bob Dylan. In one of the strangest marriages of art and commerce imaginable, the poet laureate of the counterculture, an iconic heavyweight of hip detachment, is shilling young women in lingerie. Dylan appears in the ads, which made its debut Tuesday during American Idol and will run on The O.C., Will & Grace and other shows in 15-, 30- and 60-second versions.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | April 22, 2004
IT WAS AFTER GETTING another alarming glimpse of Bob Dylan's frozen mug in that commercial for Victoria's Secret that I realized the whole concept behind celebrity product endorsements escapes me. Let's examine that Victoria's Secret commercial for a moment. OK, here's a company selling a product, namely sexy lingerie. It's a company that promotes a certain image of itself. An image of eternal youth. An image of playfulness. An image of sex appeal. In fact, the image of sex is promoted so relentlessly you get the feeling Victoria's Secret believes most of the world's ills - including war, poverty and environmental degradation - would largely disappear if only women would show more cleavage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Phil Kloer and Phil Kloer,Cox News Service | April 4, 2004
How many bust lines can a bra push up / Before they see the sky? The answer, my friend, is in a new Victoria's Secret television commercial starring Bob Dylan. In one of the strangest marriages of art and commerce imaginable, the poet laureate of the counterculture, an iconic heavyweight of hip detachment, is shilling young women in lingerie. Dylan appears in the ads, which made its debut Tuesday during American Idol and will run on The O.C., Will & Grace and other shows in 15-, 30- and 60-second versions.
NEWS
November 29, 2001
The following editorial appeared in the Chicago Tribune Nov. 24: IN THE battle of the networks to compete with cable TV's edgy and uncensored fare, a recent special on ABC scored unexpected attention - from the government. The Victoria's Secret Fashion Show opened more than a few eyelids when its televised lingerie exhibition uncovered body areas seldom seen on network TV. It also prompted about 600 telephone calls and e-mails to the Federal Communications Commission, according to Commissioner Michael Copps.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | November 14, 2001
On ABC's Monday Night Football this week, announcer Al Michaels dutifully was plugging the network's prime-time special featuring Victoria's Secret lingerie models. Without skipping a beat, Dennis Miller retorted: "You know what Victoria's secret is? It's sweeps." And with that snappy repartee, the comedic ranter turned sports broadcaster explained television in November. "Sweeps" periods help local stations set advertising rates, while this month is one of the industry's most important of these periods.
NEWS
By David Boldt | September 21, 1999
FURTHER evidence that American taste may have deteriorated beyond repair comes from two recent articles in the Wall Street Journal on declining standards of dress in the workplace: "Tight T-shirts, stretch sweaters, bare legs," the Journal reported in a fashion article, "and that's the men."The larger problem, that story and another suggest, is women. They are now headed for work in clingy sweaters with plunging V-necks, tight shirts, micro-miniskirts and stiletto heels.The opening example was of a woman making a formal presentation in a tube top. All of which requires further contemplation of that most ponderable of questions facing modern man: What would they wear if they wanted to be regarded as sex objects?
NEWS
By Judith Green Grilling the neighbors | October 19, 1997
Close to the altogetherTHREE ELEGANTLY slim women modeling fancy underwear in Victoria's Secret at the Annapolis Mall one day last week were no ordinary lingerie buyers.They were dancers Sandra Prehoda, Anmarie Touloumis and Shari Vazquez of Ballet Theater of Annapolis, looking for costumes to wear in their roles as the naked brides of Dracula in BTA's production this weekend of the vampire thriller.Their attire had to be as close to the altogether as possible. Which is what brought them to Victoria's Secret.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | December 20, 1994
Somewhere out there, someone is buying me a Christmas present, and it is probably clothes.They will probably fit. I have been the same size my whole life. But will these clothes be me?You know what I mean. Will they be my colors? Will they make a statement? Will they say something about me? Will they define me, my age, my lifestyle, my generation? Will they show my personal flair, my imagination, my good taste?Did the gift-giver see them on the department store rack and say, "My god, this is Susan.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | November 14, 2001
On ABC's Monday Night Football this week, announcer Al Michaels dutifully was plugging the network's prime-time special featuring Victoria's Secret lingerie models. Without skipping a beat, Dennis Miller retorted: "You know what Victoria's secret is? It's sweeps." And with that snappy repartee, the comedic ranter turned sports broadcaster explained television in November. "Sweeps" periods help local stations set advertising rates, while this month is one of the industry's most important of these periods.
NEWS
October 6, 1995
County police arrested a Bowie man and a 17-year-old Bowie girl Tuesday on theft charges after a stolen credit card was used to buy $747 worth of clothing from five stores at Marley Station.Police said a Macy's security guard called shortly after 4:30 p.m. when he saw two people picking up clothes without looking at size or price. He warned the sales clerk to ask for a second identification if one tried to use a credit card.When the girl attempted to pay with a card, the clerk asked for identification.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | December 20, 1994
Somewhere out there, someone is buying me a Christmas present, and it is probably clothes.They will probably fit. I have been the same size my whole life. But will these clothes be me?You know what I mean. Will they be my colors? Will they make a statement? Will they say something about me? Will they define me, my age, my lifestyle, my generation? Will they show my personal flair, my imagination, my good taste?Did the gift-giver see them on the department store rack and say, "My god, this is Susan.
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