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October 15, 1997
"A GRAND DESIGN: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum'' is one of the most ambitious museum shows in memory. Its 250-some objects, each of intense interest, collectively tell the story of the institution in London that largely defined the public museum. Subplots include how arts are made, the changing purposes of the museum and the transformations in taste dictating what is to be collected.The Museum of Manufactures grew out of the Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations at the Crystal Palace -- a marvel of modern iron and glass design -- in Hyde Park, London, in 1851.
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September 29, 2003
Chamber of Commerce plans luncheon, talks Oct. 7 in Columbia The Howard County Chamber of Commerce will hold its General Member Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Oct. 7 at the Sheraton Columbia Hotel, 10207 Wincopin Circle, Columbia. The theme is "Measure Up: The State of the Chamber and Business Update." Chamber Board Chairman Linda Burton will present a State of the Chamber Report and discuss key indicators of business growth. Economist Anirban Basu will present a program on the economy and opportunities for business growth in the region, "This Time the Economy Really is Getting Better ... Promise."
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 16, 1998
"A Grand Design" has been a mostly grand success.The exhibit of works from London's Victoria and Albert Museum opened Oct. 12 at the Baltimore Museum of Art and runs through Sunday. It has been the third-largest-drawing show in the museum's history, attracting 150,000 visitors, though it didn't quite reach the museum's projection of 170,000.The attendance leaders are the 1991-1992 show of works by Claude Monet from the Boston Museum of Fine Arts (215,000) and the 1996-1997 show of works by Andrew Wyeth (170,000)
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 16, 1998
"A Grand Design" has been a mostly grand success.The exhibit of works from London's Victoria and Albert Museum opened Oct. 12 at the Baltimore Museum of Art and runs through Sunday. It has been the third-largest-drawing show in the museum's history, attracting 150,000 visitors, though it didn't quite reach the museum's projection of 170,000.The attendance leaders are the 1991-1992 show of works by Claude Monet from the Boston Museum of Fine Arts (215,000) and the 1996-1997 show of works by Andrew Wyeth (170,000)
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 20, 1997
The Baltimore Museum of Art will sponsor a job fair Aug. 4 to fill nearly 100 temporary staff positions in preparation for "A Grand Design: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum," an exhibition on display Oct. 12 through Jan. 18."A Grand Design" will include 250 works of art, most never before exhibited in North America.Temporary staff members are needed in a variety of departments. Applicants must be available Sept. 1 through Jan. 31 and be able to work a minimum of 18 hours per week on a flexible schedule.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1997
LONDON -- Just past the 16th-century statue of Samson slaying a Philistine is a glass case of Marvel's Krazy Kat comic books. Works by Raphael are in the next wing. Down the hall is a windup wooden tiger from India, a gold-and-lacquer Japanese picnic box and an enormous Elizabethan bed.If it is collectible, there's an excellent chance that London's Victoria and Albert Museum has collected it. Many, many examples of it. Whatever it is. So, you like silver spoons? The V&A has them.Shoes? Tapestries?
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 12, 1997
From the tremendous to the tiny, the sublime to the silly, the demanding but rewarding exhibit "A Grand Design" has it all.A 19-foot-long Indian rug and an ivory box less than 2 inches high. A beautiful Chinese jade horse's head 2,000 years old and a hideous evening gown made last year. The plaster fig leaf hung strategically on the copy of Michelangelo's "David" whenever Queen Victoria came to call.Those and 251 other objects from London's Victoria and Albert Museum form the mammoth exhibit opening at the Baltimore Museum of Art today.
NEWS
October 6, 1997
In yesterday's editions of The Sun, a reference on page 1A to the Victoria and Albert Museum collection to be displayed in Baltimore beginning next weekend incorrectly identified the museum where the exhibit will be shown. The collection will open Sunday at the Baltimore Museum of Art.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 10/06/97
NEWS
September 29, 2003
Chamber of Commerce plans luncheon, talks Oct. 7 in Columbia The Howard County Chamber of Commerce will hold its General Member Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Oct. 7 at the Sheraton Columbia Hotel, 10207 Wincopin Circle, Columbia. The theme is "Measure Up: The State of the Chamber and Business Update." Chamber Board Chairman Linda Burton will present a State of the Chamber Report and discuss key indicators of business growth. Economist Anirban Basu will present a program on the economy and opportunities for business growth in the region, "This Time the Economy Really is Getting Better ... Promise."
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | December 16, 1990
The comprehensive collection of Indian art and artifacts at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London is now displayed in the museum's new Nehru Gallery. The collection comprises 35,000 objects, some dating to 200 B.C.A representative selection of the collection, drawn from the period 1550 to 1900, is on permanent display and includes paintings, sculpture, textiles and decorative arts. Other work will be changed regularly.The permanent display focuses first on the establishment of the Mogul dynasty in the 16th century and moves on to show the effect of European colonial rule on Indian art. Indian music will be played and storytelling will take place occasionally in the raised central pavilion.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 11, 1998
The Baltimore Museum of Art has extended viewing hours to accommodate visitors during the final week of the exhibition "A Grand Design: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum."The artwork from the London museum will be on display through next Sunday.Since "A Grand Design" opened to the public in October, 130,000 people from nearly every state have visited the BMA to see what the New York Times hailed as "a beautiful exhibition, worth a trip from New York or anywhere else within reason."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | November 23, 1997
IN THE MID-19th century, the world's great museums were founded to educate the public through morally uplifting works of art. A century and a half later, museums still aim at moral uplift, but the art of today seems reluctant to cooperate.At least that's one implication of "A Grand Design," the exhibition of 200 or so objects from Britain's Victoria and Albert Museum currently on display at the Baltimore Museum of Art.The V&A show is as much about the changing role of the museum as it is about art. As a consequence, it raises -- if only indirectly -- a pressing and politically pertinent question for our own time: Just what are museums for?
NEWS
October 15, 1997
"A GRAND DESIGN: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum'' is one of the most ambitious museum shows in memory. Its 250-some objects, each of intense interest, collectively tell the story of the institution in London that largely defined the public museum. Subplots include how arts are made, the changing purposes of the museum and the transformations in taste dictating what is to be collected.The Museum of Manufactures grew out of the Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations at the Crystal Palace -- a marvel of modern iron and glass design -- in Hyde Park, London, in 1851.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1997
Bagpipes wailed. Punch squabbled with Judy. And Queen Victoria, or someone who looked remarkably like her, strolled regally through the Baltimore Museum of Art.The museum marked the opening yesterday of its most expensive and ambitious exhibition yet with free admission and festivities that ranged from tea parties to puppet shows -- and drew an estimated 4,500 people to view the art, nibble cookies or just make merry."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 12, 1997
From the tremendous to the tiny, the sublime to the silly, the demanding but rewarding exhibit "A Grand Design" has it all.A 19-foot-long Indian rug and an ivory box less than 2 inches high. A beautiful Chinese jade horse's head 2,000 years old and a hideous evening gown made last year. The plaster fig leaf hung strategically on the copy of Michelangelo's "David" whenever Queen Victoria came to call.Those and 251 other objects from London's Victoria and Albert Museum form the mammoth exhibit opening at the Baltimore Museum of Art today.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1997
It is after hours at the Baltimore Museum of Art. The ticket window is closed. The day's visitors have gone home, and so have the volunteer tour guides.But a sort of art is being made.In a large gallery, designer Karen Nielsen is high above the floor in a cherry picker, tinkering with the lights. Curator Brenda Richardson stands below, contemplating the placement of several art objects. Since early summer, the two women and a team of staff members have been working nearly round-the-clock to install the museum's next exhibition.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1996
The Baltimore Museum of Art will announce today its most ambitious and costly exhibition to date, an eclectic display of 255 art objects from the collections of London's renowned Victoria and Albert Museum.The exhibition -- which includes paintings, sculptures, examples of high fashion and decorative arts -- will open Oct. 12, 1997.It will remain at the BMA for three months before traveling to Boston, Toronto, Houston and San Francisco.Visitors will be able to see part of the Victoria and Albert's vast holdings, a collection that is, in effect, a portrait of the British Empire and of the instinct for acquiring objects.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 14, 1996
LONDON -- And then there's the gigantic plaster cast of Michelangelo's David. The one that comes complete with attachable fig leaf.That about sums up the Victoria and Albert Museum -- an amazing place with a rich and varied collection where anything goes.Raphael's Cartoons hang next door to Christian Dior's Bar suit. There's a Frank Lloyd Wright-designed plywood office. Without windows. There are Persian carpets, jewels from India, tables from China, armor from Japan, Wedgwood vases, Chippendale furniture and 4.5 million other items of decorative art spilling over 7 1/2 miles of galleries and hallways.
NEWS
October 6, 1997
In yesterday's editions of The Sun, a reference on page 1A to the Victoria and Albert Museum collection to be displayed in Baltimore beginning next weekend incorrectly identified the museum where the exhibit will be shown. The collection will open Sunday at the Baltimore Museum of Art.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 10/06/97
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1997
LONDON -- Just past the 16th-century statue of Samson slaying a Philistine is a glass case of Marvel's Krazy Kat comic books. Works by Raphael are in the next wing. Down the hall is a windup wooden tiger from India, a gold-and-lacquer Japanese picnic box and an enormous Elizabethan bed.If it is collectible, there's an excellent chance that London's Victoria and Albert Museum has collected it. Many, many examples of it. Whatever it is. So, you like silver spoons? The V&A has them.Shoes? Tapestries?
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