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Victor Hugo

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NEWS
By Michael H. Price and Michael H. Price,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | June 23, 1996
If Walt Disney were around to see the results of his cartoon studio's "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" adaptation, chances are he'd exclaim: "Gosh! This'll make Victor Hugo!"Disney had exclaimed similarly about his musically driven feature, "Fantasia," and Beethoven during the early 1940s, defining the true conceit of the popular culture: It actually fancies itself in a class with the higher forms.In a broader sense, however, Disney was also right about "Fantasia," for the arrogant concert-film experiment did introduce Beethoven and its other chosen composers to a whole new shirtsleeves audience.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts | December 13, 2009
There is nothing like a dream to create the future. Utopia today; flesh and blood tomorrow. - Victor Hugo in "Les Miserables" (1862) A lifetime ago, when she was a girl in North Linthicum, Addie Houston had a talk with her father, a successful engineer and inventor who traveled the world. "Some children aren't as lucky as you are," she remembers him saying. "They have to grow up without parents. It's just something you ought to know." The thought horrified Addie, then 5. She cried herself to sleep, but not before fixing a plan in her mind.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 9, 2000
"Les Miserables" bills itself as "The World's Most Popular Musical." And, now that "Cats," the longest running show in Broadway history, is slated to close in June, the "Les Mis" boast may not be overstated. With "Cats" out of the picture, "Les Mis" will be the longest running show that is, well, still running. When the national touring production opens its two-week run here Tuesday, it will be the fifth time Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg's musical adaptation of Victor Hugo's 1862 novel has played the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre, one of the smallest theaters this large production visits.
NEWS
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to the Sun | June 3, 2007
The Temptation of the Impossible Victor Hugo and "Les Miserables" By Mario Vargas Llosa Princeton University Press / 232 pages / $24.95 Known to Americans primarily as the author of The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Les Miserables, Victor Hugo (1802-1885) is considered France's greatest poet and one of its greatest prose writers. Hugo's stature, according to The Temptation of the Impossible by Mario Vargas Llosa, is due mainly to the impact of Les Miserables. Why did the novel exert such a profound influence on Hugo's literary status?
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | July 21, 1996
HAVRE de GRACE -- There's a tremendous intellectual debate raging right now about the Disney people's cartoon version of ''The Hunchback of Notre Dame,'' and trying to follow it can make a person feel a little like a cartoon character himself, a spectator at a sort of madcap tennis game.First, Disney serves up ''Hunchback'' as fare for adults in kiddie camouflage, which is exactly the way McDonalds offered us the Arch Deluxe. At last, the creators of Mickey and Donald seem to be saying, grown-ups can send the children to bed and enjoy a cartoon movie themselves without feeling mildly creepy about it.That's because, animated or not, this is Victor Hugo.
NEWS
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to the Sun | June 3, 2007
The Temptation of the Impossible Victor Hugo and "Les Miserables" By Mario Vargas Llosa Princeton University Press / 232 pages / $24.95 Known to Americans primarily as the author of The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Les Miserables, Victor Hugo (1802-1885) is considered France's greatest poet and one of its greatest prose writers. Hugo's stature, according to The Temptation of the Impossible by Mario Vargas Llosa, is due mainly to the impact of Les Miserables. Why did the novel exert such a profound influence on Hugo's literary status?
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 2000
"I read with reluctance the librettos that are sent me," wrote Giuseppe Verdi, the great opera composer. "It is impossible, or almost impossible, for someone else to divine what I want." In the case of "Rigoletto," the musical tale of murder, treachery and tragedy to be presented this weekend by the Annapolis Opera, Verdi wanted a script that almost no one else liked. That play was Victor Hugo's "Le roi s'amuse," which opened and closed Nov. 22, 1832, after a single disastrous performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 10, 1992
When "Les Miserables" came to the Mechanic Theatre two years ago, it looked and sounded better than any show ever had there. Now it's back, and although a few of the performances don't shine as brightly, the overall effect is as splendid as ever.No matter how often you see "Les Mis" -- and some fans have reportedly become addicted to it -- it's still breathtaking to behold the manner in which Victor Hugo's classic 19th century novel has been transformed into a modern musical classic.Credit for this belongs not only to French songwriters Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg and co-directors John Caird and Trevor Nunn, but also to set designer John Napier, who employs a giant turntable to propel one of the most relentless and resonant chase scenes in literary history -- a chase in which the mightiness of the law pursues the righteousness of the just.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 10, 1992
When "Les Miserables" came to the Mechanic Theatre two years ago, it looked and sounded better than any show ever had there. Now it's back, and although a few of the performances don't shine as brightly, the overall effect is as splendid as ever.No matter how often you see "Les Mis" -- and some fans have reportedly become addicted to it -- it's still breathtaking to behold the manner in which Victor Hugo's classic 19th century novel has been transformed into a modern musical classic.Credit for this belongs not only to French songwriters Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg and co-directors John Caird and Trevor Nunn, but also to set designer John Napier, who employs a giant turntable to propel one of the most relentless and resonant chase scenes in literary history -- a chase in which the mightiness of the law pursues the righteousness of the just.
FEATURES
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1999
PARIS -- Only a few days after I arrived in Paris to cover the French Open for The Sun, a friend said to me, "Why is it you go to Paris and everyone goes on strike?"I laughed. After all, only the museums and the baggage handlers at the airport had gone on strike.But then, two days ago, the Metro went on strike too, and it was no longer funny.The Metro is the Paris subway. With its workers on strike, the City of Light snarled to a halt. Buses, if you could figure out the routes and transfers, were packed and slow.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 2000
"I read with reluctance the librettos that are sent me," wrote Giuseppe Verdi, the great opera composer. "It is impossible, or almost impossible, for someone else to divine what I want." In the case of "Rigoletto," the musical tale of murder, treachery and tragedy to be presented this weekend by the Annapolis Opera, Verdi wanted a script that almost no one else liked. That play was Victor Hugo's "Le roi s'amuse," which opened and closed Nov. 22, 1832, after a single disastrous performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 9, 2000
"Les Miserables" bills itself as "The World's Most Popular Musical." And, now that "Cats," the longest running show in Broadway history, is slated to close in June, the "Les Mis" boast may not be overstated. With "Cats" out of the picture, "Les Mis" will be the longest running show that is, well, still running. When the national touring production opens its two-week run here Tuesday, it will be the fifth time Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg's musical adaptation of Victor Hugo's 1862 novel has played the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre, one of the smallest theaters this large production visits.
FEATURES
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1999
PARIS -- Only a few days after I arrived in Paris to cover the French Open for The Sun, a friend said to me, "Why is it you go to Paris and everyone goes on strike?"I laughed. After all, only the museums and the baggage handlers at the airport had gone on strike.But then, two days ago, the Metro went on strike too, and it was no longer funny.The Metro is the Paris subway. With its workers on strike, the City of Light snarled to a halt. Buses, if you could figure out the routes and transfers, were packed and slow.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | July 21, 1996
HAVRE de GRACE -- There's a tremendous intellectual debate raging right now about the Disney people's cartoon version of ''The Hunchback of Notre Dame,'' and trying to follow it can make a person feel a little like a cartoon character himself, a spectator at a sort of madcap tennis game.First, Disney serves up ''Hunchback'' as fare for adults in kiddie camouflage, which is exactly the way McDonalds offered us the Arch Deluxe. At last, the creators of Mickey and Donald seem to be saying, grown-ups can send the children to bed and enjoy a cartoon movie themselves without feeling mildly creepy about it.That's because, animated or not, this is Victor Hugo.
NEWS
By Michael H. Price and Michael H. Price,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | June 23, 1996
If Walt Disney were around to see the results of his cartoon studio's "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" adaptation, chances are he'd exclaim: "Gosh! This'll make Victor Hugo!"Disney had exclaimed similarly about his musically driven feature, "Fantasia," and Beethoven during the early 1940s, defining the true conceit of the popular culture: It actually fancies itself in a class with the higher forms.In a broader sense, however, Disney was also right about "Fantasia," for the arrogant concert-film experiment did introduce Beethoven and its other chosen composers to a whole new shirtsleeves audience.
NEWS
January 14, 1993
Tough GoingIn answer to William Hudson Jr., president of AFSCME Council 92 ("State Business," letters, Jan. 4), I would say let's stop having the tail wag the dog.He was not elected to represent the citizens of Maryland. He represents the interest of the public employees, who are in reality hired by us the citizens. Please do not tell us that we are not being taxed enough.I believe that it is really arrogant to compare what citizens of individual states are paying in taxes based on their relative incomes.
NEWS
January 14, 1993
Tough GoingIn answer to William Hudson Jr., president of AFSCME Council 92 ("State Business," letters, Jan. 4), I would say let's stop having the tail wag the dog.He was not elected to represent the citizens of Maryland. He represents the interest of the public employees, who are in reality hired by us the citizens. Please do not tell us that we are not being taxed enough.I believe that it is really arrogant to compare what citizens of individual states are paying in taxes based on their relative incomes.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts | December 13, 2009
There is nothing like a dream to create the future. Utopia today; flesh and blood tomorrow. - Victor Hugo in "Les Miserables" (1862) A lifetime ago, when she was a girl in North Linthicum, Addie Houston had a talk with her father, a successful engineer and inventor who traveled the world. "Some children aren't as lucky as you are," she remembers him saying. "They have to grow up without parents. It's just something you ought to know." The thought horrified Addie, then 5. She cried herself to sleep, but not before fixing a plan in her mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 10, 1992
When "Les Miserables" came to the Mechanic Theatre two years ago, it looked and sounded better than any show ever had there. Now it's back, and although a few of the performances don't shine as brightly, the overall effect is as splendid as ever.No matter how often you see "Les Mis" -- and some fans have reportedly become addicted to it -- it's still breathtaking to behold the manner in which Victor Hugo's classic 19th century novel has been transformed into a modern musical classic.Credit for this belongs not only to French songwriters Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg and co-directors John Caird and Trevor Nunn, but also to set designer John Napier, who employs a giant turntable to propel one of the most relentless and resonant chase scenes in literary history -- a chase in which the mightiness of the law pursues the righteousness of the just.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 10, 1992
When "Les Miserables" came to the Mechanic Theatre two years ago, it looked and sounded better than any show ever had there. Now it's back, and although a few of the performances don't shine as brightly, the overall effect is as splendid as ever.No matter how often you see "Les Mis" -- and some fans have reportedly become addicted to it -- it's still breathtaking to behold the manner in which Victor Hugo's classic 19th century novel has been transformed into a modern musical classic.Credit for this belongs not only to French songwriters Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg and co-directors John Caird and Trevor Nunn, but also to set designer John Napier, who employs a giant turntable to propel one of the most relentless and resonant chase scenes in literary history -- a chase in which the mightiness of the law pursues the righteousness of the just.
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