Advertisement
HomeCollectionsVictor Frankenstein
IN THE NEWS

Victor Frankenstein

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 31, 2012
The talents of students from three local schools will be on stage beginning this evening, Friday, Oct. 26, when the Loyola Blakefield Players present its fall drama, "Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus," the classic tale of horror about a scientist who re-animates a corpse. The story was originally published in 1818, and has had numerous screen and stage re-creations. It was was modified for the stage by Victor Gialanella from the novel by Mary Shelley. The Loyola Blakefield production stars senior Tim Neil as scientist Victor Frankenstein, and freshman Nigel Goldsborough as The Creature.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 31, 2012
The talents of students from three local schools will be on stage beginning this evening, Friday, Oct. 26, when the Loyola Blakefield Players present its fall drama, "Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus," the classic tale of horror about a scientist who re-animates a corpse. The story was originally published in 1818, and has had numerous screen and stage re-creations. It was was modified for the stage by Victor Gialanella from the novel by Mary Shelley. The Loyola Blakefield production stars senior Tim Neil as scientist Victor Frankenstein, and freshman Nigel Goldsborough as The Creature.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Diane Cameron | October 31, 2006
One of the scariest moments in the horror movie genre is when the baby-sitter gets the telephone call telling her, "He's in the house with you!" The "he," of course, is the bad guy/murderer/monster. The week leading up to today's celebration of Halloween has given us lots of spine chillers to entertain us. One of the classic scary bad-guy stories is Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley. A best-seller in 1816 and rarely out of print since, Frankenstein is probably the most beautifully written of all scary books.
NEWS
By Diane Cameron | October 31, 2006
One of the scariest moments in the horror movie genre is when the baby-sitter gets the telephone call telling her, "He's in the house with you!" The "he," of course, is the bad guy/murderer/monster. The week leading up to today's celebration of Halloween has given us lots of spine chillers to entertain us. One of the classic scary bad-guy stories is Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley. A best-seller in 1816 and rarely out of print since, Frankenstein is probably the most beautifully written of all scary books.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | June 12, 1993
More than a half-century before Freud thought up the science of psychoanalysis, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley plotted out a pretty insightful understanding of some of the mind's inner conflicts in her 1818 novel, "Frankenstein, Or The Modern Prometheus."Now, most viewers remember "Frankenstein," the landmark 1931 film with Boris Karloff, as the prototypical horror/monster movie, followed by many more versions. But a new cable television telling of the story delves more deeply into Shelley's original psycho-study.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 4, 1994
And who was the most important stylistic influence on Kenneth Branagh for his version of "Mary Shelley's Frankenstein"? Was it James Whale, director of the 1931 original? Was it Robert Wiene, director of the archetypal German expressionist monster masterpiece, "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari"? Or possibly even Terrence Fischer, who did the Frankenstein movies for Hammer Films in England in the delirious early '60s?No. I think it was . . . Roone Arledge.What Branagh has done is turn the Mary Shelley novel into "Monday Night Football."
NEWS
By CHARLES M. OLIVER | October 31, 1991
Once again, as Halloween approaches, the semi-comic image of Frankenstein's monster lurches toward us from movies and ads and costume shops, his stiff arms akimbo and neck bolts glowing red. But lost in the frivolity is the idea that the original source -- Mary Shelley's horror novel, ''Frankenstein'' -- is an allegory on the industrial revolution of the 19th century and an increasingly relevant warning against uncontrolled scientific experimentation.Shelley's...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | March 29, 2009
Just like the inventor's assistant concealed inside a chess-playing robot, The Mechanical beats with a human heart and soul. But there are so many distracting gears and wheels involved in this world premiere at Theatre Project, so many hidden compartments with false bottoms, it can be difficult for the audience to penetrate to the living core. The MacArthur Award-winning Bond Street Theatre has a fascinating story to tell, a stunning visual theatrical vocabulary, and skilled performers to pull both off. The play, written and directed by Michael McGuigan, melds the familiar, fictitious story of Frankenstein's monster with the less well-known, but equally strange real-life story of a machine named "The Turk."
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUN STAFF | July 10, 2003
Olney Theatre Center's fifth annual Potomac Theatre Festival opens Wednesday with Neal Bell's Monster, adapted from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Updating some of the language, but not the 19th century setting, Bell's play focuses on the issue of personal accountability. An Obie Award winner and playwright-in-residence at the Yale School of Drama, Bell also scripted the adaptation of Emile Zola's Therese Raquin that was produced at Olney three summers ago. Monster stars Christopher Lane as the title character, Jeffries Thaiss as Victor Frankenstein and Valerie Leonard in the dual roles of Frankenstein's mother and a servant.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | October 25, 1998
Turn back the clock to an era when truth was taken to be beauty and beauty truth, and a pre-eminent poet could declare with conviction that "that is all ye know on earth, and all ye need to know."John Keats' odes, including that glory addressed to a Grecian Urn, were published about 1820, the very peak of Romanticism. Keats was a pal of Percy Bysshe Shelley and his child-bride, Mary. Romantics all, they were a rough crowd, nonetheless, breaking marriage vows all over the place, living mainly in Italy more or less to avoid creditors and aggrieved spouses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 4, 1994
And who was the most important stylistic influence on Kenneth Branagh for his version of "Mary Shelley's Frankenstein"? Was it James Whale, director of the 1931 original? Was it Robert Wiene, director of the archetypal German expressionist monster masterpiece, "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari"? Or possibly even Terrence Fischer, who did the Frankenstein movies for Hammer Films in England in the delirious early '60s?No. I think it was . . . Roone Arledge.What Branagh has done is turn the Mary Shelley novel into "Monday Night Football."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | June 12, 1993
More than a half-century before Freud thought up the science of psychoanalysis, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley plotted out a pretty insightful understanding of some of the mind's inner conflicts in her 1818 novel, "Frankenstein, Or The Modern Prometheus."Now, most viewers remember "Frankenstein," the landmark 1931 film with Boris Karloff, as the prototypical horror/monster movie, followed by many more versions. But a new cable television telling of the story delves more deeply into Shelley's original psycho-study.
NEWS
By CHARLES M. OLIVER | October 31, 1991
Once again, as Halloween approaches, the semi-comic image of Frankenstein's monster lurches toward us from movies and ads and costume shops, his stiff arms akimbo and neck bolts glowing red. But lost in the frivolity is the idea that the original source -- Mary Shelley's horror novel, ''Frankenstein'' -- is an allegory on the industrial revolution of the 19th century and an increasingly relevant warning against uncontrolled scientific experimentation.Shelley's...
NEWS
By Stephen Vicchio | April 3, 1992
Prejudice is a raft onto which the ship-wrecked mind clambers and paddles to safety.-- Ben Hecht (1947)John Frohnmayer, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, broke weeks of silence since his firing to attack President Bush bluntly yesterday for lacking the courage to stand up to Patrick J. Buchanan's assaults on the federal arts agency. "Pat Buchanan is a Frankenstein monster that George Bush helped to create," Frohnmayer said in a speech to the National Press Club.* -- The Sun, March 24, 1992 MARY SHELLEY'S novel, "Frankenstein," has always been more complicated than the American popular imagination would have it. I was thinking about Shelley's book the other day when I heard another of Patrick Buchanan's attacks on the National Endowment for the Arts.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.