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Victor Borge

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FEATURES
September 14, 2000
Victor Borge, the noted pianist and comedian, has had to cancel his scheduled performance with the Baltimore Symphony next week, due to the grave illness of his wife. Consequently, the BSO SuperPops season will open instead with the Smothers Brothers, who will perform four concerts, Sept. 21-24. The duo, known for their puckish wit and impish interplay, last appeared with the BSO in 1993. Newly appointed BSO Assistant Conductor Lara Webber will also be on the bill, conducting light pieces by Tchaikovsky and others.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Brandon Soderberg | August 15, 2012
Tonight's episode, a two-hour slog through 12 YouTube acts, began with Nick Cannon apologizing for the show before it even got started. He made sure to note that Season Five's YouTube shows yielded Jackie Evancho, who ended up being the runner-up that year. The implicit message was, "Hey, these aren't just some bums from the Internet. " Oh, but they are totally bums from the Internet. Let's meet them before the majority of them go away forever, tomorrow night: Clint Carvalho & His Extreme Parrots: A schlubby guy who trained a cockatoo named Kitten to fly into the "AGT" studio from a building across the street.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 24, 2000
Victor Borge, the irrepressible musical humorist, pianist and conductor saluted worldwide as "the comedian of the keyboard," died yesterday in his sleep at his home in Greenwich, Conn. He was 91. Mr. Borge made Broadway history in the 1950s when his show, "Comedy in Music," ran for 849 performances at the Golden Theater, a record for a one-man engagement. With that show, the Danish-born Borge perfected a blend of comedy and virtuosic pianism that combined musical satire with sight gags and verbal quips.
NEWS
October 28, 2006
LEONID HAMBRO, 86 Victor Borge's sidekick Leonid Hambro, a concert pianist who served as Victor Borge's comedic sidekick and was known for his ability to commit to memory a huge repertoire, died Monday at his Manhattan home of complications from a fall, said his wife, Barbara Hambro. He had a 10-year partnership with Mr. Borge, beginning in 1961, that earned him the most visibility. Mr. Borge's piano comedy act had Mr. Hambro playing the straight guy to his antics. He also had a 16-year career as pianist for WQXR radio station, where he played live weekly broadcasts and chamber music recitals.
NEWS
October 28, 2006
LEONID HAMBRO, 86 Victor Borge's sidekick Leonid Hambro, a concert pianist who served as Victor Borge's comedic sidekick and was known for his ability to commit to memory a huge repertoire, died Monday at his Manhattan home of complications from a fall, said his wife, Barbara Hambro. He had a 10-year partnership with Mr. Borge, beginning in 1961, that earned him the most visibility. Mr. Borge's piano comedy act had Mr. Hambro playing the straight guy to his antics. He also had a 16-year career as pianist for WQXR radio station, where he played live weekly broadcasts and chamber music recitals.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | October 27, 1996
150 years ago in The SunOct. 30: BY MAGNETIC TELEGRAPH -- Philadelphia -- The three o'clock train from Baltimore, when near Chester, ran over three cows, throwing the cars off the track and upsetting the express car.Nov. 2: Parade -- Should the weather prove not too unfavorable, the Sharp-Shooters, under Capt. Lilly, will make their first parade, since their re-organization, this afternoon.100 years ago in The SunOct. 27: The annual "point to point" cross-country run of the Green Spring Valley Hunt Club will take place Thursday afternoon.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | March 6, 1992
Although the special fare broadcast during public television fund-raising time soon seems awfully familiar, something new has been added to buttress the Maryland Public Television spring drive that begins tonight.Appropriately enough in an election year, when no candidate can run for office without a polling coordinator, a poll of viewers came out this week.Are you surprised that 79 percent of the 700 viewers who took part in the survey said MPT is "very important" when asked, "How important do you believe MPT is to the citizens of Maryland and neighboring states that also receive our signal?"
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1999
Every year, CBS uses the slowest TV week of the year -- the week between Christmas and New Year's -- to showcase the annual "Kennedy Center Honors" program and spotlight the careers of some of this country's most talented performers. This year, the spotlight falls on Victor Borge, Sean Connery, Judith Jamison, Jason Robards Jr. and Stevie Wonder."The Kennedy Center Honors" never wants for worthy honorees -- everyone from Leonard Bernstein to Fred Astaire to B.B. King to Bob Dylan has been feted, each with a segment in which fellow performers pay tribute.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brandon Soderberg | August 15, 2012
Tonight's episode, a two-hour slog through 12 YouTube acts, began with Nick Cannon apologizing for the show before it even got started. He made sure to note that Season Five's YouTube shows yielded Jackie Evancho, who ended up being the runner-up that year. The implicit message was, "Hey, these aren't just some bums from the Internet. " Oh, but they are totally bums from the Internet. Let's meet them before the majority of them go away forever, tomorrow night: Clint Carvalho & His Extreme Parrots: A schlubby guy who trained a cockatoo named Kitten to fly into the "AGT" studio from a building across the street.
FEATURES
By ELISE T. CHISOLM | September 15, 1995
How do you say goodbye to a newspaper, the one where you worked for 30 years?Well, it's not easy. It's like saying goodbye to a member of your family who has stood beside you, sometimes frustrated you, but whom you loved all the same. Someone, something that was a part of your daily life for so long.It was, in reality, a job. Yet a newspaper speaks to the world every day, and those who work there help it to talk. Unlike some large companies, a newspaper can be the voice and soul of its city.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 24, 2000
Victor Borge, the irrepressible musical humorist, pianist and conductor saluted worldwide as "the comedian of the keyboard," died yesterday in his sleep at his home in Greenwich, Conn. He was 91. Mr. Borge made Broadway history in the 1950s when his show, "Comedy in Music," ran for 849 performances at the Golden Theater, a record for a one-man engagement. With that show, the Danish-born Borge perfected a blend of comedy and virtuosic pianism that combined musical satire with sight gags and verbal quips.
FEATURES
September 14, 2000
Victor Borge, the noted pianist and comedian, has had to cancel his scheduled performance with the Baltimore Symphony next week, due to the grave illness of his wife. Consequently, the BSO SuperPops season will open instead with the Smothers Brothers, who will perform four concerts, Sept. 21-24. The duo, known for their puckish wit and impish interplay, last appeared with the BSO in 1993. Newly appointed BSO Assistant Conductor Lara Webber will also be on the bill, conducting light pieces by Tchaikovsky and others.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1999
Every year, CBS uses the slowest TV week of the year -- the week between Christmas and New Year's -- to showcase the annual "Kennedy Center Honors" program and spotlight the careers of some of this country's most talented performers. This year, the spotlight falls on Victor Borge, Sean Connery, Judith Jamison, Jason Robards Jr. and Stevie Wonder."The Kennedy Center Honors" never wants for worthy honorees -- everyone from Leonard Bernstein to Fred Astaire to B.B. King to Bob Dylan has been feted, each with a segment in which fellow performers pay tribute.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | October 27, 1996
150 years ago in The SunOct. 30: BY MAGNETIC TELEGRAPH -- Philadelphia -- The three o'clock train from Baltimore, when near Chester, ran over three cows, throwing the cars off the track and upsetting the express car.Nov. 2: Parade -- Should the weather prove not too unfavorable, the Sharp-Shooters, under Capt. Lilly, will make their first parade, since their re-organization, this afternoon.100 years ago in The SunOct. 27: The annual "point to point" cross-country run of the Green Spring Valley Hunt Club will take place Thursday afternoon.
FEATURES
By ELISE T. CHISOLM | September 15, 1995
How do you say goodbye to a newspaper, the one where you worked for 30 years?Well, it's not easy. It's like saying goodbye to a member of your family who has stood beside you, sometimes frustrated you, but whom you loved all the same. Someone, something that was a part of your daily life for so long.It was, in reality, a job. Yet a newspaper speaks to the world every day, and those who work there help it to talk. Unlike some large companies, a newspaper can be the voice and soul of its city.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | March 6, 1992
Although the special fare broadcast during public television fund-raising time soon seems awfully familiar, something new has been added to buttress the Maryland Public Television spring drive that begins tonight.Appropriately enough in an election year, when no candidate can run for office without a polling coordinator, a poll of viewers came out this week.Are you surprised that 79 percent of the 700 viewers who took part in the survey said MPT is "very important" when asked, "How important do you believe MPT is to the citizens of Maryland and neighboring states that also receive our signal?"
FEATURES
September 16, 1990
Three Marylanders were among the nominees for one of the more arcane Emmy Awards, camera-video technical direction in a miniseries or special, that were scheduled to be announced late last night in Beverly Hills, Calif.Donna Quante, Helene Haviland and Bill Greenback were cited for their camera work on "Wolftrap Presents Victor Borge: An 80th Birthday Celebration," which aired on PBS. Ms. Quante, who lives in Hampstead and works on "The Cosby Show," has been nominated 10 times for an Emmy and won three times.
NEWS
By Julius Westheimer | February 29, 2000
BECAUSE 2000 is a leap year, we receive an extra day on Feb. 29. And although today might not be your day off, here are suggestions for any bonus day: Take money and food to any soup kitchen. Our Daily Bread, 411 Cathedral St. serves more than 1,100 hungry men, women and children 365 days a year. Enjoy an hour in the Peabody Library, a local treasure we often overlook. Hop on the 6: 38 a.m. northbound Metroliner, enjoy breakfast over the Susquehanna River, arrive in Wilmington at 7: 23. Cross the platform, board a southbound train at 7: 46 and arrive in Baltimore at 8: 31 -- in time for work!
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