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Victims Of Domestic

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NEWS
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,Contributing Writer | October 30, 1994
Harford County victims of domestic violence and sexual assault will be provided immediate refuge from potentially lethal situations when a new shelter opens next fall.Officials of the Sexual Assault/Spouse Abuse Resource Center Inc. unveiled architectural drawings Wednesday for the conversion of a county-owned building in Bel Air into a shelter for battered women and children.The group also launched a yearlong drive to secure contributions to complete renovation of the shelter and raise money to finance its operating costs.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2013
Jannah Tucker, the New Town basketball star who decided this summer not to play for Tennessee after the Lady Vols had signed her, said she has been a victim of domestic violence. Rumors began circulating after Tucker, rated the No. 8 recruit in the nation in ESPNU's 2013 HoopGurlz Super 60, cited “personal reasons” for not enrolling at Tennessee. In November 2012, she had signed with the Lady Vols and accepted a full scholarship. Last week, a report on social media alleged that Tucker had been beaten several times over the summer by her boyfriend and most recently, two weeks ago, so badly that she could no longer play basketball.
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NEWS
April 9, 2001
The Domestic Violence Program of the Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland will establish a lending library at its Woodlawn office to provide educational and self-help resources for low-income victims of domestic violence. The library, which will be open next month, is to be funded by a $10,000 grant from the Maryland attorney general's office. The Domestic Violence Program of the Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland has been serving victims of domestic violence since 1984.
NEWS
By Dorothy Lennig, Judith A. Wolfer and Deena Hausner | May 6, 2013
It takes incredible courage for a victim of domestic violence to apply for a protective order. Victims must make their way to the courthouse, often while they are still experiencing the effects of their abuse. At the courthouse, they must write a description of how they were abused, and then describe their abuse again to a judge, often in front of a courtroom filled with strangers. If the judge determines that there has been abuse, the judge will issue a temporary protective order that must be served by a law enforcement officer on the alleged abuser.
NEWS
By Pepper Ballard and Pepper Ballard,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2001
First Step Project, a domestic-abuse prevention team, has received a car - donated by a Westminster auto dealership - that will be used to take victims to Carroll County shelters or court hearings. The car will enable Amy Jarkiewicz, First Step Project's coordinator, to use something other than her own car to transport victims of domestic abuse. The program, which began in Westminster in 1997, recently expanded to include all of Carroll County. First Step Project is a joint effort of the police departments in Carroll County and Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1997
Just 15 minutes before she was to have seen a judge, Rhonda Romero was shot dead a block away from the courthouse in downtown Baltimore by the husband she was hoping the justice system would protect her from.The attack last year on the steps of the War Memorial Building was one of 1,500 slayings that were the focus of an emotional, national march against domestic violence yesterday afternoon in Washington.One by one, the victims' names were read, as thousands of marchers carried wood figures representing those who were killed.
NEWS
October 4, 2009
Last month, Theodore Blandford broke into the Lothian home of his estranged wife, Sheena Blandford, and shot her to death, along with her sister, Cheryl Timmons. Ms. Blandford knew she was in danger; two weeks earlier she had requested a protective order from the courts after her husband threatened to kill her by running over her with his truck and bashing her with a hammer. Ms. Blandford's death was only one of many well-publicized incidents this year that threw a bright spotlight on the problem of domestic violence in Maryland - a problem made more acute by the economic downturn, which has exacerbated the turmoil in troubled families and put thousands more women at greater risk of serious injury or death at the hands of abusive partners.
NEWS
February 3, 2009
Mary Crawford is alive today because her estranged husband wasn't a very good shot. During an argument in their Carroll County home in 2001, he pulled out a shotgun and twice fired at her and missed. At the time, she had a restraining order against him. But the law did not require that her husband surrender his gun despite his history of threats and abuse. Now, Ms. Crawford is a compelling advocate to change Maryland law to keep guns out of the hands of spouses and others with a record of domestic violence.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1998
The Howard County state's attorney's office has been awarded state grants for programs that will assist victims of domestic violence and juvenile crime, as well as alert parents to the dangers of drug, alcohol and tobacco use in children.The grants will fund the salaries of a part-time prosecutor who will specialize in domestic violence cases and a staff member who will supervise volunteers helping victims of domestic violence and juvenile crime.Howard County State's Attorney Marna L. McLendon said she is "grateful that we have added the positions to better focus on the issues of domestic violence and victim assistance in juvenile cases -- the largest growing group of cases in the county."
NEWS
March 24, 2009
We've said it before and we'll say it again: Firearms and domestic violence don't mix. So why is the Maryland Senate trying to wreck a bill intended to protect victims of abuse by tacking on an amendment that would keep guns on the table in domestic violence cases? This is cynical politics at its worst. The bill, sponsored by Gov. Martin O'Malley, would require judges to confiscate firearms from partners who are under final restraining orders as a result of domestic violence. The rationale is obvious: Given the explosive nature of abusive relationships, the presence of any firearm can quickly turn deadly.
NEWS
By Leigh Goodmark | October 20, 2011
After learning that Topeka, Kan., District Attorney Chad Taylor planned to stop prosecuting misdemeanor domestic violence cases in response to county budget cuts, the Topeka City Council this month repealed its misdemeanor domestic violence statute - effectively decriminalizing some domestic violence offenses in Topeka. Abuse survivor Claudine Dombrowski responded to the city's action by hurling a pair of dice at the City Council, arguing that they were rolling the dice with women's lives.
NEWS
August 18, 2011
Susan Reimer highlights several positive steps that insurance companies are taking (with a nudge from the federal government) to enhance the physical and emotional well-being of women in this country ("Big step forward for women's health," Aug. 15). Included among the preventative care measures is a mandate that counseling for domestic violence victims be provided without a co-pay or deductible. Yet while this provision is to be applauded, it does not ensure that similar services are available for male victims of domestic violence.
NEWS
By Naomi Sternlicht | May 31, 2011
What would you do if your spouse punched out your television? What if he (or she) threw a table across the room and it smashed to pieces against the wall in a fit of rage? Even if you weren't touched during this episode of violence and intimidation, aren't you a victim of it? Do you deserve protection? By Maryland's narrow definition of abuse, you may not. It virtually all cases, it will take more than destroyed property, incessant and harassing text messages, or even your abuser coming to your home uninvited to convince a judge that you deserve the protection of the state.
NEWS
October 4, 2009
Last month, Theodore Blandford broke into the Lothian home of his estranged wife, Sheena Blandford, and shot her to death, along with her sister, Cheryl Timmons. Ms. Blandford knew she was in danger; two weeks earlier she had requested a protective order from the courts after her husband threatened to kill her by running over her with his truck and bashing her with a hammer. Ms. Blandford's death was only one of many well-publicized incidents this year that threw a bright spotlight on the problem of domestic violence in Maryland - a problem made more acute by the economic downturn, which has exacerbated the turmoil in troubled families and put thousands more women at greater risk of serious injury or death at the hands of abusive partners.
NEWS
September 14, 2009
Sheena Blandford might still be alive if the judge who issued a final protective order against her abusive husband had also confiscated the gun he used to murder her. Ms. Blandford clearly feared for her life when she applied for a protective order in August after her estranged husband, Theodore Blandford, threatened to kill her. But on her petition for court protection she failed to check a box requesting a judge to confiscate her husband's firearms -...
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Arin.Gencer@baltsun.com | June 18, 2009
With Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon maintaining a public hands-off stance for now, some are waiting to see how she handles assault charges that have been filed by two city officials who previously were romantically involved. Beyond reiterating Wednesday that she has "a no-tolerance level for domestic violence," Dixon declined to comment further on the accusations that Elizabeth C. Smith, a liquor board commissioner, and Demaune Millard, her chief of staff, have made against each other. "This is a private matter - I want to give them that privacy to move through that process as we move forward," Dixon said.
NEWS
September 9, 1997
The Sexual Assault/Spouse Abuse Resource Center Inc. (SARC), a nonprofit organization in Bel Air that assists victims of domestic violence and sexual assault, is seeking volunteers to answer a 24-hour help line, accompany victims and provide office assistance.Volunteer training will begin next month. Each volunteer will be trained in crisis counseling, crisis intervention and the dynamics of domestic violence and sexual assault. Information: Anne Stockwell, 410-836-8431.Pub Date: 9/09/97
NEWS
By Dan Harsha and Dan Harsha,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2003
Anne Arundel County officials began participation yesterday in a national program intended to collect unwanted wireless phones, refurbish them and donate them to victims of domestic abuse. The goal is to gather 300 wireless phones from nine collection centers around the county through April 30. The effort is being jump-started by a donation of 25 phones - complete with limited emergency service - from Nextel Communications Inc. and Motorola Inc. "Victims of domestic violence feel themselves in danger," said State's Attorney Frank R. Weathersbee, who joined with Sheriff George F. Johnson IV to announce participation in the Call to Protect program.
NEWS
March 24, 2009
We've said it before and we'll say it again: Firearms and domestic violence don't mix. So why is the Maryland Senate trying to wreck a bill intended to protect victims of abuse by tacking on an amendment that would keep guns on the table in domestic violence cases? This is cynical politics at its worst. The bill, sponsored by Gov. Martin O'Malley, would require judges to confiscate firearms from partners who are under final restraining orders as a result of domestic violence. The rationale is obvious: Given the explosive nature of abusive relationships, the presence of any firearm can quickly turn deadly.
NEWS
February 3, 2009
Mary Crawford is alive today because her estranged husband wasn't a very good shot. During an argument in their Carroll County home in 2001, he pulled out a shotgun and twice fired at her and missed. At the time, she had a restraining order against him. But the law did not require that her husband surrender his gun despite his history of threats and abuse. Now, Ms. Crawford is a compelling advocate to change Maryland law to keep guns out of the hands of spouses and others with a record of domestic violence.
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