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By Alix Christie and Alix Christie,Contributing Writer | April 11, 1993
PARIS -- Fifty years after they collaborated to send 76,00 Jews to their deaths in Nazi camps, two leaders of France's Vichy regime are being called to account.One, the former head of Vichy police, Rene Bousquet, is alive and may face charges for crimes against humanity. The other, long-dead Vichy chief of state Philippe Petain, is being tried in the court of public opinion with the appearance of an unprecedented film on his World War II government.Mr. Bousquet, who ordered the roundup of 12,884 Jews by French police in the summer of 1942 for deportation to Auschwitz, is the archetypal French administrator who went on to a brilliant banking career after the war.Petain, the World War I hero who stepped in to lead France after its defeat in 1940, incarnates a conservative, anti-international tradition in French society whose legacy is carried today by the extremist, right-wing group, the National Front.
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NEWS
December 3, 2013
Sunday in an op-ed in the Frederick News-Post , former delegate and county commissioner Charles Jenkins (no relation to Frederick County Sheriff Chuck Jenkins) waxed poetic at great length about how his former colleague Jan Gardner was a shoo-in to be the first Frederick County Executive next year.  I guess they can cancel the election, for a former delegate hath spoken... Clearly, Mr. Jenkins is still smarting about his 2010 Primary election defeat to current Del. Michael Hough in the Republican Primary.
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NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | November 11, 1990
PARIS -- The French government appears eager to drop prosecution of Rene Bousquet, the French Vichy chief of police who ordered the deportation of Jewish children, on charges of crimes against humanity.Recent reports that French President Francois Mitterrand had told associates he wanted to see the Bousquet case "buried" have aroused anger among survivors of the Holocaust, their families and human rights advocates. They are interpreting Mr. Mitterrand's alleged remarks as a signal that other French war criminals also will never be brought to trial.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | April 7, 1998
PARIS -- The verdict in France's trial of Maurice Papon for complicity in crimes against humanity -- "guilty," but with a sentence of just 10 years -- was apologetic, not Solomonic. It followed from the realization by the jury and by much of the public that they had the wrong man.They wanted a man of recognizable evil, defiant in his crimes or contemptible in his evasions. What they got was an arrogant old man whose crime was to have been a careerist.While the jury convicted him of the charge that had been brought, they did not impose the full possible sentence, life imprisonment, or the 20 years in prison that the prosecutor demanded.
NEWS
By Bernard D. Kaplan and Bernard D. Kaplan,Hearst News Service | September 8, 1994
PARIS -- All of France is intrigued by why President Francois Mitterrand cooperated in the writing of a new book that describes how he faithfully served the wartime Vichy government and remained friendly afterward with some of that pro-Nazi regime's most unsavory characters.The book, "A French Youth," lifts the veil on Mr. Mitterrand's World War II years. It details his role as a Vichy official so devoted to its chief, Marshal Philippe Petain, that he was awarded a high decoration attesting to his loyalty.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 23, 1992
Paris -- In 1972, Robert Paxton, an American historian, published a history of the wartime Petain government in France. He argued that it had been not only collaborationist but a dynamic and coherent attempt to create a new France -- conservative, corporatist and authoritarian.He said the Vichy regime produced technocratic and administrative innovations that greatly influenced postwar France. He also said that Vichy had its own racialist ideas, and that its policies toward the Jews were not simply dictated by the German occupation authorities.
NEWS
October 21, 1997
ONE OF THE MOST solemn memorials to the Holocaust lies in the heart of Paris. The visitor descends steep, narrow steps to a mausoleum-like chamber dedicated to the French citizens, mostly Jews, exported to Germany for extermination during World War II. That was the Deportation.The comfortable assumption was that it was all the act of hated German occupiers. This is now challenged in the trial of Maurice Papon for organizing the deportation of 1,560 Jews for the subservient French government at Vichy.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | September 15, 1994
Paris -- In the end, it is a question of character. During nearly a half-century Francois Mitterrand built a political career founded on ambition and dominated by his sense of rivalry with Charles De Gaulle.He is nearing the end of his second seven-year term as president of the Fifth French Republic, which De Gaulle founded. De Gaulle failed to complete a full term, resigning in 1969 as old age closed on him, and in the aftermath of the popular upheaval of May 1968.Mr. Mitterrand now is old too, and very ill from prostate cancer.
NEWS
September 15, 1994
A FEW years ago when Austrian Chancellor Kurt Waldheim's Nazi past was exposed, the former United Nations secretary general's first response was denial. When that didn't work, he tried to discredit his accusers, and when the uproar continued he adopted a stance of proud defiance.Now comes French President Francois Mitterrand, whose collaboration with his country's Nazi-dominated Vichy government during World War II is the subject of two new books due out this fall.Rather than deny his past, Mr. Mitterrand went out of his way to cooperate with one of the books' authors and publicly acknowledged his ties to right-wing political groups in the years leading up to the war.Mr.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | April 7, 1998
PARIS -- The verdict in France's trial of Maurice Papon for complicity in crimes against humanity -- "guilty," but with a sentence of just 10 years -- was apologetic, not Solomonic. It followed from the realization by the jury and by much of the public that they had the wrong man.They wanted a man of recognizable evil, defiant in his crimes or contemptible in his evasions. What they got was an arrogant old man whose crime was to have been a careerist.While the jury convicted him of the charge that had been brought, they did not impose the full possible sentence, life imprisonment, or the 20 years in prison that the prosecutor demanded.
NEWS
October 21, 1997
ONE OF THE MOST solemn memorials to the Holocaust lies in the heart of Paris. The visitor descends steep, narrow steps to a mausoleum-like chamber dedicated to the French citizens, mostly Jews, exported to Germany for extermination during World War II. That was the Deportation.The comfortable assumption was that it was all the act of hated German occupiers. This is now challenged in the trial of Maurice Papon for organizing the deportation of 1,560 Jews for the subservient French government at Vichy.
NEWS
By Susannah Patton and Susannah Patton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 3, 1997
PARIS -- In 1942, when he was 17, Michel Slitinsky fled the French police, who were searching for Jews in the city of Bordeaux. He escaped by hiding on rooftops, but his father and other Jews there were less fortunate: They were captured, deported and died in German concentration camps.Slitinsky ever since has sought to find and bring to justice the person he believed responsible for his father's death. After a 15-year legal battle, Slitinsky and 49 other families of Holocaust victims are about to encounter him in court.
NEWS
July 18, 1996
Paul Touvier, 81, the only Frenchman convicted of World War II crimes against humanity, died yesterday in a prison hospital near Paris after serving two years for the reprisal executions of seven Jews. Mr. Touvier, who ordered the 1944 executions to avenge the assassination of the Vichy propaganda chief, had prostate cancer. He spent much of his life on the run, sheltered by elements in the Roman Catholic Church. Twice convicted in absentia for treason, he was pardoned by President Georges Pompidou in 1971 at the behest of Catholic officials.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | September 15, 1994
Paris -- In the end, it is a question of character. During nearly a half-century Francois Mitterrand built a political career founded on ambition and dominated by his sense of rivalry with Charles De Gaulle.He is nearing the end of his second seven-year term as president of the Fifth French Republic, which De Gaulle founded. De Gaulle failed to complete a full term, resigning in 1969 as old age closed on him, and in the aftermath of the popular upheaval of May 1968.Mr. Mitterrand now is old too, and very ill from prostate cancer.
NEWS
September 15, 1994
A FEW years ago when Austrian Chancellor Kurt Waldheim's Nazi past was exposed, the former United Nations secretary general's first response was denial. When that didn't work, he tried to discredit his accusers, and when the uproar continued he adopted a stance of proud defiance.Now comes French President Francois Mitterrand, whose collaboration with his country's Nazi-dominated Vichy government during World War II is the subject of two new books due out this fall.Rather than deny his past, Mr. Mitterrand went out of his way to cooperate with one of the books' authors and publicly acknowledged his ties to right-wing political groups in the years leading up to the war.Mr.
NEWS
By Bernard D. Kaplan and Bernard D. Kaplan,Hearst News Service | September 8, 1994
PARIS -- All of France is intrigued by why President Francois Mitterrand cooperated in the writing of a new book that describes how he faithfully served the wartime Vichy government and remained friendly afterward with some of that pro-Nazi regime's most unsavory characters.The book, "A French Youth," lifts the veil on Mr. Mitterrand's World War II years. It details his role as a Vichy official so devoted to its chief, Marshal Philippe Petain, that he was awarded a high decoration attesting to his loyalty.
NEWS
July 18, 1996
Paul Touvier, 81, the only Frenchman convicted of World War II crimes against humanity, died yesterday in a prison hospital near Paris after serving two years for the reprisal executions of seven Jews. Mr. Touvier, who ordered the 1944 executions to avenge the assassination of the Vichy propaganda chief, had prostate cancer. He spent much of his life on the run, sheltered by elements in the Roman Catholic Church. Twice convicted in absentia for treason, he was pardoned by President Georges Pompidou in 1971 at the behest of Catholic officials.
NEWS
December 3, 2013
Sunday in an op-ed in the Frederick News-Post , former delegate and county commissioner Charles Jenkins (no relation to Frederick County Sheriff Chuck Jenkins) waxed poetic at great length about how his former colleague Jan Gardner was a shoo-in to be the first Frederick County Executive next year.  I guess they can cancel the election, for a former delegate hath spoken... Clearly, Mr. Jenkins is still smarting about his 2010 Primary election defeat to current Del. Michael Hough in the Republican Primary.
NEWS
By Alix Christie and Alix Christie,Contributing Writer | April 11, 1993
PARIS -- Fifty years after they collaborated to send 76,00 Jews to their deaths in Nazi camps, two leaders of France's Vichy regime are being called to account.One, the former head of Vichy police, Rene Bousquet, is alive and may face charges for crimes against humanity. The other, long-dead Vichy chief of state Philippe Petain, is being tried in the court of public opinion with the appearance of an unprecedented film on his World War II government.Mr. Bousquet, who ordered the roundup of 12,884 Jews by French police in the summer of 1942 for deportation to Auschwitz, is the archetypal French administrator who went on to a brilliant banking career after the war.Petain, the World War I hero who stepped in to lead France after its defeat in 1940, incarnates a conservative, anti-international tradition in French society whose legacy is carried today by the extremist, right-wing group, the National Front.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 23, 1992
Paris -- In 1972, Robert Paxton, an American historian, published a history of the wartime Petain government in France. He argued that it had been not only collaborationist but a dynamic and coherent attempt to create a new France -- conservative, corporatist and authoritarian.He said the Vichy regime produced technocratic and administrative innovations that greatly influenced postwar France. He also said that Vichy had its own racialist ideas, and that its policies toward the Jews were not simply dictated by the German occupation authorities.
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