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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2011
Virginia Lambrow, a retired vice president of Baltimore Contractors who was an early pioneer in the construction industry, died of congestive heart failure Tuesday at her Graceland Park home. She was 92. Born in Clarksburg, W.Va., she attended Victory High School and earned a degree at West Virginia Wesleyan College. After moving to Baltimore in 1941, she received a degree at the old Mount Vernon School of Law. She was trained as a bookkeeper and joined Victor Frenkil at his Baltimore Contractors in the early 1940s.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Coppin State University suffered a $2.5 million revenue shortfall this fall because of a drop in enrollment, and school officials said Tuesday that the deficit is being offset with cuts to the administration and other cost-saving measures rather than tuition increases. Coppin State spokeswoman Tiffany Jones said Tuesday that the school enrolled 3,133 students this fall, 250 less than a year ago. Tuition, plus fees, for in-state students is about $6,000. To offset part of the shortfall, a school vice president and an assistant vice president have been let go, Jones said.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 21, 2014
One of the enduring misperceptions of American politics is that the vice presidency is a steppingstone to the presidency. Of the 47 men who have held the office, only four were elected to the Oval Office as sitting standbys: Adams, Jefferson, Van Buren and, 152 years later, the senior George Bush. And, of these, only Jefferson was given a second term. This bit of history has not discouraged the widespread impression that the individual "a heartbeat away" from the presidency has some kind of leg up on competitors for the office.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Vice President Joe Biden will be in town this weekend, to help Baltimore celebrate its "Star-Spangled Banner" bicentennial. The vice president, who hails from neighboring Delaware, will be at Fort McHenry Saturday night to deliver remarks during a concert that will be broadcast live on PBS, beginning at 8 p.m. His remarks are scheduled for 9:30 p.m. Following Biden's remarks, singer Jordin Sparks will lead a performance of "The Star-Spangled Banner,"...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Kathleen Polk, a retired T. Rowe Price vice president and activist for social issues who cultivated a wide circle of friends, died in her sleep Sunday at her Roland Park home. She was 65. "She embodied the idea that strength and compassion don't have to be opposing values," said Dr. Daniel Munoz, a Johns Hopkins cardiologist and friend. "She was fiery, smart, but full of warmth at the same time. " Born Kathleen Louise Gelinas in New York City, she attended the Academy of the Sacred Heart in Manhattan and earned a bachelor of arts degree from Newton College in Newton, Mass.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Coppin State University suffered a $2.5 million revenue shortfall this fall because of a drop in enrollment, and school officials said Tuesday that the deficit is being offset with cuts to the administration and other cost-saving measures rather than tuition increases. Coppin State spokeswoman Tiffany Jones said Tuesday that the school enrolled 3,133 students this fall, 250 less than a year ago. Tuition, plus fees, for in-state students is about $6,000. To offset part of the shortfall, a school vice president and an assistant vice president have been let go, Jones said.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1999
New positionsNextel appoints Rosenberg director of marketingNextel Communications appointed Ellis R. Rosenberg director of marketing for the wireless carrier's Bethesda-based mid-Atlantic area. The Wharton School and University of Maryland graduate will oversee advertising, public relations, pricing, product introduction and promotions.Hilliard is marketing chief for Comcast OnlineComcast Online Communications named Carrie Hilliard as marketing coordinator for the White Marsh Comcast Cable unit.
NEWS
January 31, 2013
Jules Witcover's commentary ("Don't count Biden out in 2016," Jan. 29) contrasts the vice president's potency with former vice presidents who had little influence or significance in American history. Indeed, when Lyndon Johnson was broached by John Kennedy in 1960 to be Kennedy's running mate, LBJ allegedly asked his mentor and fellow Texan, John Nance Garner, about the vice presidency. Garner, who was Roosevelt's veep between 1933 and 1941, allegedly replied, "Lyndon, the vice presidency isn't worth a bucket of spit!"
BUSINESS
February 15, 1999
New positionsLincoln is vice president of city tourism agencyThe Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association named Daniel M. Lincoln vice president of tourism and communications.He will be responsible for several departments, convention and leisure travel marketing, visitor services and publications. Before coming to Baltimore, the Ohio State University graduate was a vice president of the Greater Cincinnati Convention and Visitors Bureau.Whitmore Print appoints Goldscher vice presidentWhitmore Print and Imaging appointed Jay Goldscher vice president for sales and administration at the Annapolis-based printing services firm.
FEATURES
By Richard Seven and Richard Seven,The Seattle Times | July 26, 2007
What's the best way for you to exercise? Well, that depends, say the authors of Zodiaction, a book that bills itself as "the first-ever workout program based on your astrological sign." Authors Ellen Barrett and Barrie Dolnick reason that millions of people seek guidance from horoscopes in their personal lives, so why not when exercising? The book breaks down the best workouts -- and the ones to avoid -- for each sign. It's clearly female-centric, too, but for what it's worth, here's a quick spin through the Zodiac wheel: Aries (March 21-April 19)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Bernard I.H. "Bernie" Kramer, a retired Baltimore public school vice principal who earlier had been an English department head and reading teacher, died Aug. 14 at Autumn Ridge Nursing Center in Pikesville of complications from a stroke. He was 92. The son of Harry Krasner, a plasterer, and Vivian Levita Krasner, Bernard Herman Krasner was born in Pruzhany, Poland, which is now part of Belarus. He was 4 when he and his family left Poland and arrived at Ellis Island in New York Harbor.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
The new superintendent of the Naval Academy said Thursday that the institution is a national leader in confronting sexual assault and sexual harassment among students, and should be helping other schools tackle what he described as a widespread problem. The Naval Academy has drawn national attention for the alleged assault of a female midshipman at a party in Annapolis and the subsequent investigation of three members of the Navy football team. The prosecution came amid a growing public focus on sexual assaults both in the military and on college campuses.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
Howard Marion Gamse, a former vice president of Gamse Lithographing Co., died Aug. 11 of cancer in his North Baltimore home. He was 89. Mr. Gamse was the son of Herman Gamse, co-founder of Gamse Lithographing Co., and Lily Gamse, a schoolteacher, and grew up the fourth of five children in Windsor Hills. Originally, the company operated on Lombard Street before moving to its current location on Pulaski Highway. The family sold the company in 1983. A graduate of City College, Mr. Gamse served in the Air Force as a radio operator before going to Kutztown State Teachers College where he trained to become an art teacher.
NEWS
Jules Witcover | August 4, 2014
What if Hillary Clinton doesn't seek the presidency in 2016? Waiting patiently and noncommittally in the wings is Vice President Joe Biden. He might well be reluctant to take her on, considering the powerhouse she has become, with an army of Democratic women "Ready for Hillary" to unleash them. But almost certainly Mr. Biden would run if she didn't, and why not? Many, particularly Republicans relieved at not having to face her in the general election, would peddle their favorite impression: that Mr. Biden is a loose cannon who would run the country with his foot in his mouth.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
Charles N. "Norm" Murphy, a retired CSX executive and a collector of Baltimore & Ohio Railroad memorabilia, died Monday of lymphoma at Howard County General Hospital. He was 87. Charles Norman Murphy was born in Baltimore into a B&O family. His father, Norman Murphy, had been in the railroad's operating and labor relations departments. Two uncles each had 40 years' service in the purchasing and passenger traffic departments. His mother, Bertha Murphy, was a homemaker. He was raised on Augusta Avenue, and while a junior at City College, began his railroad career in 1943 as a part-time messenger in the "GO" central telegraph office in the B&O's headquarters building at North Charles and Baltimore streets.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Ober S. Herr Jr., a retired Carroll County banker and community activist, died Thursday of renal failure at his Westminster home. He was 87. Ober Samuel Herr Jr. was born and raised in Westminster, where he grew up in a home on Ridge Road. He was a grandson of William Roberts McDaniel, who had spent 65 years at Western Maryland College as a student, professor, administrator and trustee. In 2002, college trustees changed the name to McDaniel College in his honor. Mr. Ober was a 1944 graduate of Westminster High School and interrupted his college education at Western Maryland College to enlist in 1945 in the Navy, where he served as an aviation machinist's mate.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- With the first presidential caucuses and primaries still nearly four months away, Vice President Al Gore is facing another test of his political credibility next week -- a decision by the AFL-CIO on whether to endorse him or delay the decision.The informed opinion now is that Gore will get the endorsement, though it is by no means assured. In most presidential election cycles, Big Labor's support for a sitting Democratic vice president would be pro forma.But Gore's uncertain campaign has given his rival for the nomination, Bill Bradley, the grounds to question whether the unions might be moving too fast.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 21, 2014
One of the enduring misperceptions of American politics is that the vice presidency is a steppingstone to the presidency. Of the 47 men who have held the office, only four were elected to the Oval Office as sitting standbys: Adams, Jefferson, Van Buren and, 152 years later, the senior George Bush. And, of these, only Jefferson was given a second term. This bit of history has not discouraged the widespread impression that the individual "a heartbeat away" from the presidency has some kind of leg up on competitors for the office.
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