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NEWS
March 17, 2005
On March 12, 2005, ELEANOR M. VICCHIO (nee Cortezi), beloved wife of the late Frank Vicchio, devoted aunt and godmother of Samuel Joseph Cortese and Ellen Cortezi-Kuder, dear sister of Michael James Cortezi and the late Samuel Joseph Cortezi. Services and Interment were private.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 17, 2005
On March 12, 2005, ELEANOR M. VICCHIO (nee Cortezi), beloved wife of the late Frank Vicchio, devoted aunt and godmother of Samuel Joseph Cortese and Ellen Cortezi-Kuder, dear sister of Michael James Cortezi and the late Samuel Joseph Cortezi. Services and Interment were private.
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NEWS
May 2, 2003
On Wednesday, April 30, 2003 JOHN ROCCO SR., beloved husband of Elmira C. Vicchio (nee Higgins), loving father of Gale and husband Dennis Clark, Dale Wolters, Stephen and wife Sandra Vicchio and J. Rocco Jr. and wife Kim, devoted brother of Donald Vicchio and the late Mary Louise Conway, cherished grandfather of Todd, Brent, Heather, Craig, Ryan, Tierney, Brad, Johsua, Chandler, Reed and Jack, cherished great grandfather of Ryleigh, Catie Flynn, Shaylan,...
NEWS
May 2, 2003
On Wednesday, April 30, 2003 JOHN ROCCO SR., beloved husband of Elmira C. Vicchio (nee Higgins), loving father of Gale and husband Dennis Clark, Dale Wolters, Stephen and wife Sandra Vicchio and J. Rocco Jr. and wife Kim, devoted brother of Donald Vicchio and the late Mary Louise Conway, cherished grandfather of Todd, Brent, Heather, Craig, Ryan, Tierney, Brad, Johsua, Chandler, Reed and Jack, cherished great grandfather of Ryleigh, Catie Flynn, Shaylan,...
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2002
For most of her college career, Georgetown women's lacrosse goalie Chandler Vicchio played the understudy. Waiting in the wings, she watched Bowen Holden perform the starring role for three years, earning All-America status twice and national Goalkeeper of the Year honors last season. Vicchio, like any good understudy, used the rehearsal time to hone her skills, filling in when necessary and prepping for the day when the star would depart. When her turn came, Vicchio was ready for the spotlight.
NEWS
By Story by Tom Dunkel and Story by Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
For in much wisdom is much grief; and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow. Ecclesiastes 1:18 A bomb went off inside Stephen Vicchio's head. The explosion occurred shortly before 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 25th. It was a crisp, cusp-of-autumn evening in Annapolis.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 2, 1995
John Vicchio looks like the Marlboro Man in his golden years. He's got this rugged face chiseled and weathered by half a century working on the rooftops of Baltimore. He is 67 years old but still has muscles where his flab ought to be. Also, there's a place in his heart for a beaten dog.The dog showed up when winter first dawned last year, and for some reason she stuck around the yards behind the 1800 block of Maryland Avenue, where Vicchio has his roofing company office. He spotted her back there.
NEWS
By Josephine Jacobsen | October 29, 1995
Books I have received from friends recently ... Barbara Howes, she was nominated for the National Book Award, Elizabeth Spires, a kind, distinguished Baltimore author, Stephen Vicchio ... I'm reading almost all poetry ... and at the moment, Grace Schulman, she's a New York poet.
NEWS
By Michael B. Sullivan | May 22, 1992
WHEN I read the article, "A brand new Frankenstein monster" (Other Voices, April 3), my reaction was one of disbelief. I know that the author, Stephen Vicchio, is chairman of the philosophy department at the College of Notre Dame. I found it difficult to accept that an article such as this could have been written by one in his position. I found the tone and manner of the article to be petty and mean-spirited, and Dr. Vicchio's assertion absurd that various acts of Presidents Reagan and Bush (the "creators of a monster . . . complete with a bolt through his neck . . ."
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | August 19, 1991
ORDINARY MYSTERIES: More Chronicles of Life, Love and Laughter. By Stephen J. Vicchio. Wakefield Editions. 245 pages. $17.95.IN ONE of the essays in this collection, Stephen Vicchio explains what he tries to do when he writes. Whether he's writing for radio or print, he says, he tries to "tell good stories -- tales about small events and those that often overwhelm the most thoughtful of us."In "Ordinary Mysteries," Vicchio, who teaches philosophy at the College of Notre Dame, largely succeeds in telling good stories, especially when they're not about himself.
NEWS
By Story by Tom Dunkel and Story by Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
For in much wisdom is much grief; and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow. Ecclesiastes 1:18 A bomb went off inside Stephen Vicchio's head. The explosion occurred shortly before 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 25th. It was a crisp, cusp-of-autumn evening in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2003
IS THERE a gene that causes humans to engage in warfare? Well, a case could be made, says Stephen Vicchio, a philosophy professor at the College of Notre Dame. Since the fifth century, he says, there have been 962 armed conflicts, which means that on any day, the chances are quite high that humans somewhere in the world are killing each other. "It's an appalling statistic," says Vicchio. Vicchio is recovering from a stroke, so he has no students this semester. But he's busy speaking and writing about the Iraq war. And his colleagues in college and university classrooms everywhere are grappling with the compelling issues it raises.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2002
For most of her college career, Georgetown women's lacrosse goalie Chandler Vicchio played the understudy. Waiting in the wings, she watched Bowen Holden perform the starring role for three years, earning All-America status twice and national Goalkeeper of the Year honors last season. Vicchio, like any good understudy, used the rehearsal time to hone her skills, filling in when necessary and prepping for the day when the star would depart. When her turn came, Vicchio was ready for the spotlight.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2001
SOME YEARS AGO, Stephen Vicchio, a philosophy professor at the College of Notre Dame, was the luncheon guest of a group of proper Roland Park ladies. "Tell me, young man," asked one of the ladies over a cucumber sandwich, "just what does a philosopher do?" That set Vicchio thinking. A short time later, the professor altered his philosophy about philosophy. He vowed never to write an obscure essay "that didn't matter in some important way. Philosophy shouldn't be something people do in private places and academic journals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | November 4, 2001
In the realm of intellect in 20th century Maryland, the single most striking event may have happened in Annapolis in 1937, when the Great Books Program began at St. John's College. There are no statues to the two founders, and the obstacles they overcame have dimmed; but Charles A. Nelson gives their flame new brilliance in his book, Radical Visions: Stringfellow Barr, Scott Buchanan and Their Efforts on Behalf of Education and Politics in the Twentieth Century (Bergin & Garvey, 226 pages, $59)
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2001
Even before the United States launched air attacks on Afghanistan, Francesca Coviello weighed in with a reasoned opinion that the American response was ethically unwarranted. "I felt it was unjust to the innocent people of Afghanistan who might be killed or wounded even though they're not combatants," says Coviello, a 21-year-old senior at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. Coviello, who is from Garrett County, didn't shout her opinion in an anti-war protest. She crafted it in a paper assigned by Stephen Vicchio, a professor of philosophy at the north Baltimore college.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2001
SOME YEARS AGO, Stephen Vicchio, a philosophy professor at the College of Notre Dame, was the luncheon guest of a group of proper Roland Park ladies. "Tell me, young man," asked one of the ladies over a cucumber sandwich, "just what does a philosopher do?" That set Vicchio thinking. A short time later, the professor altered his philosophy about philosophy. He vowed never to write an obscure essay "that didn't matter in some important way. Philosophy shouldn't be something people do in private places and academic journals.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2001
Even before the United States launched air attacks on Afghanistan, Francesca Coviello weighed in with a reasoned opinion that the American response was ethically unwarranted. "I felt it was unjust to the innocent people of Afghanistan who might be killed or wounded even though they're not combatants," says Coviello, a 21-year-old senior at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. Coviello, who is from Garrett County, didn't shout her opinion in an anti-war protest. She crafted it in a paper assigned by Stephen Vicchio, a professor of philosophy at the north Baltimore college.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1997
At parties when people ask Steve Vicchio the classic American question, "What do you do?", he replies: "I'm a teacher."He's learned that if he says, "I'm a philosopher," they look at him funny, mumble something incoherent and head for the bar. After all, when you meet a doctor of medicine at a party you can ask about your lumbago. But who asks a doctor of philosophy about a dysfunctional Weltanschauung?He's perhaps the most visible teacher of philosophy in these parts. He has taught at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland since 1981, usually about 100 students a semester, in three or four courses that range from introductory philosophy to graduate studies.
NEWS
By Jill L. Kubatko | March 30, 1996
The publisher of Dr. Stephen Vicchio's book, "The I of the Beholder," was incorrectly identified in yesterday's Religion Digest. The publisher is Cathedral Foundation Press.The Sun regrets the error.Stephen Vicchio plans book signingDr. Stephen Vicchio, author of "The I of the Beholder," will sign books at 7 p.m. April 17 at the Howard County library Miller branch, 9421 Frederick Road, Ellicott City.Dr. Vicchio is a professor of philosophy at the College of Notre Dame. His book was published by Cathedral Fountain Press.
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