Advertisement
HomeCollectionsVials
IN THE NEWS

Vials

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1996
Police are trying to determine if a substance passed among four first-graders in a city school Friday was cocaine.One of the youngsters at Charles Carroll of Carrollton Elementary School brought nine vials of a powdery white substance to school and shared the contents of two of the vials with three classmates while they worked on a group project Friday afternoon.Two of the vials were empty when their teacher, Dorothy Polk-Bostic, took them away from the children, said Robyn Washington, city schools' spokeswoman.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By D. A. Henderson | August 6, 2014
The only known stocks of the deadly smallpox virus are now kept in two designated research laboratories, one in Russia and one in the United States. This has troubled many who believe that destruction of the virus would provide greater assurance that it would never again threaten the world. Some scientists, however, insist that the intact smallpox virus is essential for their studies of new vaccines - even though the vaccines themselves are entirely different viruses. The decision to destroy the virus has thus been debated and postponed repeatedly in the World Health Assembly over the past 15 years.
Advertisement
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 11, 2001
Baltimore County police have charged a 12-year-old Franklin Middle School pupil with possession of an explosive/incendiary device after school officials found vials of household chemicals in his locker Tuesday. Cpl. Vickie Warehime, a police spokeswoman, said the seventh-grader was arrested on the felony charge late Tuesday. Police are withholding his name because he is charged as a juvenile. The chemicals are being analyzed, but the boy told police the vials contained a mixture of an anti-static spray and hydrogen peroxide, Warehime said.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 13, 2012
Health officials Saturday confirmed a 15th fungal meningitis case in Maryland as a multi-state outbreak of the disease linked to a steroid injection continued to spread. Meningitis cases have reached 198 in 13 states. One person in Maryland has died, while 15 have died nationwide. The contaminated steroid, methylprednisolone acetate, was produced and distributed by the New England Compounding Center in Framingham, Mass. Vials were sent to 76 clinics in 23 states, including seven in Maryland.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Michael James and Sheridan Lyons and Michael James,Staff Writers | October 2, 1992
Radio personality Alfred Jerome Stewart was shot and killed in a drug-infested area of East Baltimore, and police say he died with two vials of suspected crack cocaine in his hand.Mr. Stewart, a morning drive-time disc jockey for gospel radio station WWIN-AM, was shot several times in the back at 11:25 p.m. Wednesday at the corner of Cliftview Avenue and Harford )) Road.Mr. Stewart apparently parked in his Mercedes-Benz in front of a carryout restaurant shortly before he was shot. Police found him lying beside the car, its engine still running.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2004
In a case that has drawn protests from leading scientists, a prominent plague researcher who touched off a brief bioterrorism scare last year when he reported germ vials missing was sentenced yesterday to two years in prison by a federal judge in Lubbock, Texas. Dr. Thomas C. Butler, 62, was acquitted in a three-week trial of lying to the FBI about the missing vials and of most charges alleging that he mishandled plague samples. But he was convicted of 47 criminal counts, including theft, embezzlement and fraud in connection with consulting contracts.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Richard Irwin and Robert Hilson Jr. and Richard Irwin,Evening Sun Staff | May 14, 1991
A 12-year-old boy who was allegedly carrying 23 vials of cocaine is the third pre-teen to be arrested by city police in the past two weeks on drug offenses.The youth, a sixth-grade student whose name was not released, was arrested Sunday by Eastern District police officers in the 1900 block of E. Lanvale St.The boy's arrest came two days after Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke directed police to focus on city playgrounds, where a 10-year-old and an 11-year-old were arrested in separate incidents on recent days.
NEWS
By D. A. Henderson | August 6, 2014
The only known stocks of the deadly smallpox virus are now kept in two designated research laboratories, one in Russia and one in the United States. This has troubled many who believe that destruction of the virus would provide greater assurance that it would never again threaten the world. Some scientists, however, insist that the intact smallpox virus is essential for their studies of new vaccines - even though the vaccines themselves are entirely different viruses. The decision to destroy the virus has thus been debated and postponed repeatedly in the World Health Assembly over the past 15 years.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2002
The Army has suspended an environmental cleanup at Fort Detrick after workers discovered 18 vials containing potentially infectious bacteria that may have been left over from biological weapons research carried out decades ago. The three kinds of bacteria pose no threat to residents of Frederick, because the entire excavation site is covered with a containment structure and exhaust air is passed through high-efficiency filters, said Fort Detrick spokesman...
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2002
Chesapeake Biological Laboratories Inc. cut the ribbon yesterday on a $16 million plant where it will put smallpox vaccine into vials, the final step in a manufacturing process designed to stockpile enough of the vaccine to protect every U.S. civilian. The southwest Baltimore contract manufacturer, a subsidiary of Winnipeg, Manitoba-based Cangene Corp., built the 12,000-square-foot plant under a shroud of secrecy in just three months - years faster than usual for biotechnology plant construction.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
Anne Arundel County residents can get a free "vial of life" kit, a container designed to hold emergency medical and contact information, starting Friday at county fire stations. Fire Chief John Robert Ray said residents should complete the form in the 3-inch "lifesaving information for emergency" vial and place the vial in the refrigerator, which protects it from fire. A refrigerator sticker will alert emergency workers that there is a vial inside. The vial can be especially useful for people who are elderly, disabled or live alone, he said.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,david.wood@baltsun.com | February 10, 2009
The biodefense lab at Fort Detrick in Frederick began a thorough search of its freezers yesterday to ensure that it has an accurate inventory of the deadly bacteria, viruses and toxins accumulated there over a period of 40 years, Defense Department officials said. Col. John P. Skvorak, commander of the U.S. Army Medical Institute of Infectious Diseases, ordered a "stand-down," or pause in ordinary operations, and a complete inventory last week after 20 vials of "biological select agents and toxin" (BSAT)
NEWS
May 1, 2008
A man who was shot by Baltimore police officers during a traffic stop two years ago was sentenced yesterday to more than eight years in prison after pleading guilty to drug trafficking, according to the Maryland U.S. attorney's office. Cornell Slater, 22, admitted in court to selling cocaine, prosecutors said. He qualified for a longer sentence because he has been convicted twice before in state court of offenses that include crimes of violence and drugs. Baltimore police said officers stopped Slater's car Oct. 12, 2006, at Cottage and Violet avenues in Northwest Baltimore for a traffic infraction.
NEWS
September 8, 2007
A Catonsville man was sentenced to six months' home detention and ordered to perform 100 hours of community service for distributing vials and tablets of anabolic steroids over the Internet, according to the U.S. attorney's office in Baltimore. Michael Schlanger, 48, a former personal trainer for Bally's Total Fitness in Glen Burnie, was arrested last year after federal authorities said they intercepted a package of steroids at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. Prosecutors said Schlanger imported the drugs from foreign sources and had them sent to rented mailboxes reserved in phony names.
NEWS
June 15, 2007
A Catonsville man pleaded guilty yesterday in U.S. District Court to distributing vials and tablets of anabolic steroids over the Internet by importing the drugs from foreign sources and sending them to rented mailboxes reserved in false names, federal prosecutors said. Michael Schlanger, 48, a former personal trainer for Bally's Total Fitness in Glen Burnie, could receive a maximum five years in prison and three years of supervised probation when he is sentenced Sept. 7, prosecutors said.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | June 8, 2007
In more than two decades with the Drug Enforcement Administration, Carl Kotowski had never seen anything like it. At the conclusion of a nine-month heroin task force investigation that led to more than 100 federal agents and Baltimore police officers fanning out yesterday morning and arresting 11 people, authorities made a most unusual find: a woman's purse made entirely of $100 bills. The illegal drug organization was "very unique in some of its concealment," Kotowski, the assistant special agent in charge of the DEA's Baltimore office, said of the suspects' hollowed-out cans of bathroom cleanser and soda cans with secret compartments to store drugs.
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON | July 4, 1992
There are many ways to make money from the drug trade besides selling addictive chemicals. What do we call the people who sell things that support the deadly business, keeping well back from the scenes of violence and depravity playing out on the streets but just as critically involved as the ''pushers''?A couple of recent raids, executed by the ''Zone Rangers'' drug-enforcement unit, brought new attention to this mostly unseen side of the problem. Tuesday, the Rangers, plainclothes officers from the Eastern Police District, swooped downtown to seize suspected drug paraphernalia from the Sonja Wholesale shop, a showroom and warehouse near the Lexington Market.
NEWS
By Raymond L.Sanchez and Raymond L.Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | February 12, 1991
A former technician at Francis Scott Key Medical Center has been charged with stealing large quantities of morphineDaniel Chodnicki, 30, of the first block of Duntore Place in Fullerton, was indicted by the Baltimore grand jury last week on 235 counts of possession with intent to distribute morphine and Fentanyl, powerful analgesics, and diazepam (Valium), a tranquilizer. He also was charged with felony theft in what city prosecutors called the largest case of its kind in recent memory."Both the size and the scope are alarming," said State's Attorney Stuart O. Simms.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | November 18, 2006
Three workers at Aberdeen Proving Ground were taken for medical observation yesterday after a laboratory vial containing dilute mustard agent broke, officials said. The Harford County military base's emergency personnel responded to an accident in a laboratory at the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center at 11:30 a.m. after a worker handling a small quantity of the blister agent was exposed, said George Mercer, a spokesman for APG. The worker was decontaminated and sent to an on-post medical clinic for observation, Mercer said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.