Advertisement
HomeCollectionsVeterinary School
IN THE NEWS

Veterinary School

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | March 30, 2007
Robert Redford, star of the movie adaptation of Nicolas Spark's The Horse Whisperer, has nothing on Clarksville veterinarian Dr. Fred Lewis. On a superficial level, Lewis - like Redford - has sparkling blue eyes, a trim physique and a full head of hair. But on a more profound level, Lewis is a practicing horse whisperer. "I've always kind of communicated with [horses]," said Lewis, 80. "They respond to me very well. I wanted to be an animal doctor from the time I was 5. It's a good thing I got into veterinary school - if I hadn't, I don't know what I'd have done."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | March 30, 2007
Robert Redford, star of the movie adaptation of Nicolas Spark's The Horse Whisperer, has nothing on Clarksville veterinarian Dr. Fred Lewis. On a superficial level, Lewis - like Redford - has sparkling blue eyes, a trim physique and a full head of hair. But on a more profound level, Lewis is a practicing horse whisperer. "I've always kind of communicated with [horses]," said Lewis, 80. "They respond to me very well. I wanted to be an animal doctor from the time I was 5. It's a good thing I got into veterinary school - if I hadn't, I don't know what I'd have done."
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Atlanta Journal-Constitution | April 8, 1999
What we're missing is Air Fidos, expensive sneakers to allow your dog to reach its full athletic potential. Instead, there's a new sports beverage -- for dogs. Rebound, developed and marketed by Atlanta-based National Pet Supply, comes in two flavors -- Original (lemon-lime) and Ice Cool -- and retails for $1.99-$2.50 per 1.5-liter bottle. The marketers of this Gatorade for dogs promise it will replenish your canine's fluids lost in the heat of play and invigorate older dogs -- all without a smidgen of caffeine.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2006
The catastrophic injury that ended Barbaro's Triple Crown bid at Pimlico on May 20 - and the extraordinary effort by University of Pennsylvania surgeons to save him - have turned a spotlight on veterinary medicine in the United States. Enjoying little of the attention that doctors of human medicine receive, veterinary researchers are using much of the same science to understand, prevent and treat animal injuries, and to fight diseases that affect agriculture and the food supply. Veterinarians are also working on such illnesses as avian flu, West Nile virus, Lyme disease and mad cow disease in a joint effort with public health officials to safeguard human health.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2006
The catastrophic injury that ended Barbaro's Triple Crown bid at Pimlico on May 20 - and the extraordinary effort by University of Pennsylvania surgeons to save him - have turned a spotlight on veterinary medicine in the United States. Enjoying little of the attention that doctors of human medicine receive, veterinary researchers are using much of the same science to understand, prevent and treat animal injuries, and to fight diseases that affect agriculture and the food supply. Veterinarians are also working on such illnesses as avian flu, West Nile virus, Lyme disease and mad cow disease in a joint effort with public health officials to safeguard human health.
NEWS
July 15, 2007
Water for Elephants By Sara Gruen When 23-year-old Jacob Jankowski learns that his parents have been killed in a car crash, leaving him penniless, he drops out of Cornell veterinary school and parlays his expertise with animals into a job with the circus, where he cares for a menagerie of exotic creatures. He also falls in love with Marlena, one of the show's star performers - a romance complicated by Marlena's husband, the unbalanced, sadistic circus boss who beats both his wife and the animals Jankowski cares for. Gruen skillfully humanizes the midgets, drunks, rubes and freaks who populate her book.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2002
In the final hours of her life, Ellen Roche lay unconscious in a bed at the Bayview Medical Center's intensive care unit, her shallow breathing forced by a mechanical respirator. Around her gathered her family, her doctors and an anxious professor wearing black wire rim glasses. The professor, Dr. Alkis Togias, was not there to treat the patient. He was seeing the horrific conclusion of an experiment he had begun a month earlier, when he offered the healthy 24-year-old woman $365 to inhale chemicals to provoke an asthma-like reaction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | April 16, 2000
As sleek as any thoroughbreds, models paraded down a runway in Pimlico's clubhouse, decked out in clothes from Octavia for the Luck Be a Lady Fashion Show and Casino Night. Though all of the outfits were declared winners, the major "oohs" and "aahs" came at the end of the show, when models donned slinky evening gowns designed by Anne Bowen. The New York designer took a bow, along with her favorite model, Oksana Babiy, who now plays Tony's mistress on HBO's "The Sopranos." The glitzy evening, sponsored by the Maryland Jockey Club of Baltimore Inc., garnered about $45,000, benefiting the Johns Hopkins Breast Center.
NEWS
September 30, 2007
The marriage of Miss Caroline Davidson Cutchins, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Witherspoon Cutchins of Richmond, to David Alexander Koerber Boyd, son of Geoffrey and Linda Boyd, of Baltimore, took place July 14, 2007 at Saint Mary's Episcopal Church. Miss Elizabeth Matthews Cutchins of Richmond was her sister's maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Dr. Alexis Caroline Ahlfors Cutchins of Charlottesville, Virginia, Miss Ann Woods Cutchins of Charlottesville, Virginia, Miss Sangeeta Kirit Patel of Greenville, South Carolina, Miss Emily Hudson Brown of Atlanta, Georgia and Miss Elizabeth Ann Barnett of Washington, DC. Flower girl was Miss Calliope Ann Cutchins, niece of the bride.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | May 23, 2006
KENNETT SQUARE, Pa. -- Among zookeepers, farmers and the horse set, the University of Pennsylvania's George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals is renowned. But it took Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro to make the institution - and the veterinary surgeon chiefly overseeing the horse's recovery from a devastating Preakness Stakes leg injury - the center of attention. "Horses elicit a pretty deep, visceral response for a whole lot of people because of their strength, elegance and power," says Dr. Dean Richardson, the talkative and personable surgeon who - if all continues to go well - might become known as the vet who saved Barbaro.
FEATURES
By Atlanta Journal-Constitution | April 8, 1999
What we're missing is Air Fidos, expensive sneakers to allow your dog to reach its full athletic potential. Instead, there's a new sports beverage -- for dogs. Rebound, developed and marketed by Atlanta-based National Pet Supply, comes in two flavors -- Original (lemon-lime) and Ice Cool -- and retails for $1.99-$2.50 per 1.5-liter bottle. The marketers of this Gatorade for dogs promise it will replenish your canine's fluids lost in the heat of play and invigorate older dogs -- all without a smidgen of caffeine.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Evening Sun Staff | December 5, 1990
CHRIS JACKSON and her husband, Mike, have raised dalmatians for 20 years.''The first one was purchased as a pet for all the wrong reasons. We wanted a dog that was large and easy to groom, and we saw a dalmatian's picture in a book and said 'That's the one we want, it has spots.'''No breed is right for everyone. In choosing the way we did, we were lucky to have picked a good breed for us. However, prospective pet owners should study their own needs, then research breeds,'' she says.''I entered my first dalmatian in a show, and when I won, I was instantly hooked on showing,'' says Jackson, who owns the Long Last Kennels in Owings Mills where she boards ''no more than 20 dogs and gives them very personal attention.
NEWS
July 31, 2003
Dr. David Lippincott Booth, a Carroll County veterinarian who worked for the state Department of Agriculture, died of glio-blastoma multiforme, an aggressive brain tumor, Sunday at his Westminster farm. He was 65. Born in Winchester, Va., the son of a veterinarian, he was raised on his family's farm near Middleburg, Va. After graduation in 1956 from the Quaker-founded George School in Newtown, Pa., he began his college studies at Dickinson College. After a year, he left college and worked as a technician at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and as a truck driver.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.