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Veterinarian

NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | October 14, 2007
Right brain or left brain? All her life, Dr. Carin Rennings grappled with the question. Was she a right-brain artist or a left-brain scientist? Only now, having just turned 40, has she come to the comfortable conclusion that she can be both. On the science side, Rennings has built a career in Howard County as a veterinarian who makes house calls. And as an artist, she has nurtured a talent for singing and is looking forward to releasing her first CD, Love and Miracles, by the end of the year.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | May 31, 2007
After years of wishing for more basic information about on-track injuries to thoroughbreds, veterinarians will at last begin putting together a database tomorrow using an equine injury reporting system developed by Dr. Mary Scollay, veterinarian at Calder Race Course and Gulfstream Park. Scollay's pilot project will be implemented by more than 30 racetracks across the country, including Pimlico Race Course, Laurel Park and Timonium. "Most tracks have been keeping much, if not all, of this information already," Scollay said in a news release.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | April 22, 2007
The eerie sounds of a theremin filled the air. As you made your way through a crowd of creatures, you came across sexy space maidens in metallic bikinis, strange space creatures in sports jackets and bobbing antennae, and several beings who were clearly not from this Earth. Were we on some sort of forbidden planet? As a matter of fact, yes. For this was Creative Alliance's annual Marquee Ball. This year's theme was the 1956 science fiction cult film, Forbidden Planet. The "planet" in this case was, in fact, Creative Alliance's headquarters in the old Patterson Theatre.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | March 2, 2007
When veterinarian Carl E. Rogge takes his March vacation, he goes north. Far, far north, to where the temperatures might climb to 10 degrees, glaciers loom over the landscape and the dogs look nothing like the suburban canines he leaves behind. He likes to golf, fly-fish and sail, but this is his other hobby: He is part of an army of volunteers at the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, the grueling 1,200-mile race through the Arctic wilderness, checking the physical condition of the 45-pound racers.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green | December 3, 2006
The Maryland Republican Party selected an Anne Arundel County veterinarian as its new chairman yesterday as members work to rebuild after a poor showing in November's election. Jim Pelura, a longtime Republican activist, was the state chairman for President Bush's re-election campaign and the Anne Arundel chairman for Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s campaign this year. He replaces Montgomery County businessman John Kane, who led the GOP for the past four years. Pelura was selected at an annual convention in Annapolis.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | July 5, 2006
Dr. Morris Meyer Himmelstein, a veterinarian who ran a practice in Baltimore for 50 years, died Sunday at Sinai Hospital after suffering cardiac arrest. A resident of the Mount Washington section of Baltimore, he was 88. Dr. Himmelstein maintained a veterinary practice on York Road for five decades, providing care mostly for house pets and other small animals. "When I was a kid, he used to do house calls at the zoo, too," said his son Dr. Jay Himmelstein of Worcester, Mass. "He took care of the occasional wolf, too. Some people have unusual house pets."
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | June 2, 2006
Dr. E. Andrew Whittington, a veterinarian and triathlete who had been a longtime Sykesville resident, died of cardiac arrest Monday at his home in Sarasota, Fla. He was 58. Tomorrow was to have been Dr. Whittington's last day practicing veterinary medicine at University Animal Clinic in Sarasota, where he had worked since moving from Sykesville in 1999. Dr. Whittington changed careers to become a personal trainer and had recently established FIT Inc. - Focused Individual Training - and planned to work with people older than 50. An accomplished and nationally ranked amateur athlete, Dr. Whittington was a veteran of more than 20 marathons, including Boston's and New York City's, and competed in the Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN REPORTER | May 25, 2006
When a racehorse breaks through the starting gate prematurely, as Barbaro did in the Preakness Stakes, it's often an indication that bad things will follow. "I've never had a horse win when it has gone through the gate," said retired jockey Jerry Bailey. "It's kind of a track superstition," said John Veitch, a former trainer. "If it happened to a horse I was training, my heart would come right out of me. I knew the horse had been compromised." Still, no one could have expected the Kentucky Derby winner to sustain a devastating injury minutes after he bolted through the Preakness gate on Saturday.
SPORTS
May 21, 2006
"He has a fracture above and below the ankle. The way that fracture happens is they break the one above the ankle first and they have so much energy and adrenaline that they try to keep running. It's very much analogous to someone twisting their ankle badly and fracturing their ankle. He tried to keep running and he broke the bone just below the ankle because of the instability. The problems that brings up are twofold. One, there's significant danger to the blood supply to the lower limb and that's the one you worry about the most as far as this being a life-threatening injury.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE | March 11, 2006
The New York Racing Association confirmed yesterday evening it will allow horses from Laurel Park, Pimlico Race Course and the Bowie Training Center to ship to New York racetracks beginning next Saturday. "It's one step in the right direction," said Georganne Hale, the Maryland Jockey Club racing secretary. "I think this begins to put the virus issues all behind us. It just takes one state to make the move and the others will begin to drop their restrictions too. I've already heard [a rumor]
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